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Garth Ennis Loves Superheroes


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#21 wolvy

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 03:51 AM

QUOTE (Lou K @ Mar 21 2006, 03:17 PM)
QUOTE (James @ Mar 21 2006, 02:15 PM)
How many were there?


4. All of which, I think, have extra sick variant covers. Then there's a holdiay special or two.

I think The Boys sounds like mad fun. Glad to see it at Wildstorm instead of DC because it will alow them to cross the line a bit, if not just piss all over it.

If it was on DC, lots of people would call it "Hitman v 2.0" and Garth would have to tend to well known established characters, much like he did with Hitman(which don't get me wrong, was and still is a wonderful series), just that sense he said this new series is going to be on its own. Means I don't have to worry about him treading on my favorite characters.

This is one of the many comics I am really looking forward to. I wonder how far Ennis will go tho?
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Posted 23 March 2006 - 03:04 PM

QUOTE (Lou K @ Mar 21 2006, 06:17 PM)
Glad to see it at Wildstorm instead of DC because it will alow them to cross the line a bit, if not just piss all over it.


I totally agree! Darick left Marvel to be a creator with Ennis. It's really what he wanted all along, I think. Nightcrawler was cool because of the team of Darick and Aguirre-Sacasa, but there's only so much you can do with that character, IMO. Darick's at his best when he's drawing something he created ( like...oh, I dunno...Transmet!).

QUOTE
Garth Ennis Talks The Boys

If you always thought that writer Garth Ennis had a healthy, albeit semi-serious disdain for super heroes, his and (newly DC exclusive) artist Darick Robertson’s new project coming from Wildstorm isn’t about to change your mind.

In The Boys, a new ongoing series launching in October, Ennis and Robertson breathe life into the five people you absolutely do not want to know if you’ve ever considered yourself a hero.

As Robertson explained on his website: “The Boys are a team of five super-powered operatives who work for a secret department within the U.S. government. It's their job to monitor and investigate superhero behavior, they gather intelligence- i.e. dirt- on them, and occasionally to use it against them. Just as the C.I.A. has had a use for the Mafia, Sadaam Hussein, and Columbia's FARC terrorists (to name a few), so they also need superheros. Sometimes they need them on a leash. Sometimes they have to put them down. The Boys are the people who do the job.”

In speaking with Newsarama, Ennis handled the introductions:

“The Boys are Billy Butcher, Wee Hughie, The Frenchman, The Female (Of The Species) and Mother’s Milk,” Ennis said. “They’re very, very good at kicking seven colors of shit out of anyone they meet. Butcher, the boss man, is also just about the sneakiest and most dangerous man on the planet.”

Fanboys and fanmen who may already be getting a stirring in their heart, worried that Ennis and Robertson might (horror!) wade this team into an established universe where even the least hero is the object of someone’s unhealthy fan obsession can rest easy – they’re making their own heroes to take down.

That is, instead of being set in the Wildstorm Universe, and shoehorning the new characters into an existing and (as of this summer) rebooting-ish world, The Boys will take place in an all new, completely self-contained world, with no connection to any established universe, Ennis said.

If the above description of the methods and operations of the Boys has you thinking they sound like a dirty tricks squad, well…you’re pretty close to being dead-on, Ennis said. “They handle blackmail, occasional beatings, very occasional termination – all for reminding superheroes who’s boss. Their number one priority is information gathering, which is where the fun comes in: seeing all the filthy things these super-people get up to.”

As the series begins, Ennis explained, the Boys are just getting back into their groove.

“After the two-parter that introduces the characters, the first storyline sees the Boys re-establish themselves after a long absence from the scene: they pick out a teen super-group called Teenage Kix and effectively use them to fire a warning shot at the super-community - dismantling the team, laying bear all their nasty secrets,” Ennis said. “We can do this to any of you, they’re saying. So watch your step.”

The goal for the two creators with the series is to tell their story in five years – roughly sixty issues. It’s an approach Ennis took for Preacher and Hitman – both of which were done with one artist on each series, and in his view, he’s got the right artist for the job.

“Darick’s greatest strengths are his storytelling, his sense of character design, and the expert timing- comedic and otherwise- he brings to the narrative,” Ennis said of his collaborator. “He’s also more than capable of producing a monthly book, which is vital. When you’re telling a sixty issue story you don’t want to have to wait around for people.”

While the premise of The Boys – that is, a team getting the dirt on enemies and using it to discredit and defraud them – may sound like it has clear analogues in the real world, especially in politics, Ennis said that’s not what he’s aiming for with the series. In fact, the writer said he’s always wary when comics start to comment on the real world.

“Regarding any parallels to the real world, superheroes have existed in this one for sixty or seventy years- pretty standard in most superhero universes, really,” Ennis said. “It’s only when there’s a direct attempt to involve them in political and social events, ‘round about 2001, that serious problems begin.”

So where did the germ of the idea of The Boys come from?

“I guess you could say it comes from 17 years working in an industry dominated by one genre,” Ennis said. “I’ve never been a big fan of superheroes, but I can’t pretend I’m not aware of them. You look at that stuff and you go, “No, no, that’s not what would happen, this is what would really happen…” and you carry on from there. On top of that, I wanted to get my teeth into a good, long story again, something that would last for some time, rather than just another miniseries. Preacher and Hitman obviously come to mind. If I get it right, this is the book that will out-Preacher Preacher.”



See, I only kind of liked PUNISHER until Ennis & Robertson got hold of it. BORN was absolute greatness. Same with Nick Fury (it's not great but I enjoyed the Ennis/Robertson take). I think they are an excellent team.

#23 Tony B.

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 03:37 PM

Isn't that cover featuring the same font as Hitman had?
"I think I could turn and live with animals. They are so placid and self-contained. They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins. They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God. Not one of them kneels to another or to his own kind that lived thousands of years ago. Not one of them is respectable or unhappy, all over the earth."

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#24 electricinca

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Posted 23 March 2006 - 10:16 PM

QUOTE (James @ Mar 21 2006, 12:36 PM)
Oh no, an evil Simon Pegg. icon_eek.gif


That's exactly what I thought when i saw the cover.  biggrin.gif
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Posted 24 March 2006 - 10:08 AM

QUOTE
THE BOYS: ROBERTSON & ENNIS ON NEW WILDSTORM SERIES
Jennifer M. Contino
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posted 03-18-2006 04:00 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BY JENNIFER M. CONTINO
After spending a few years at Marvel Comics, Darick Robertson is now exclusive to DC Comics and working with Garth Ennis on a new project for Wildstorm called "The Boys." We've got details from Robertson on the series, his exclusive, and a few more things. Plus Garth Ennis weighs in to provide a few more particulars on this new force which they want to "out-Preacher Preacher" with, making its debut this October.

THE PULSE: I think most people are going to be surprised to hear you signed an exclusive with DC Comics - especially since you've been exclusive to Marvel Comics for a while and working on some of their biggest icons. So, what swayed you to working with DC Comics and signing your x on the dotted line ...?

DARICK ROBERTSON: I needed a change. Creative frustration and corporate policies were burning me out. I really want to just focus on one project that I can enjoy more creative control over. My friend Garth Ennis and Wildstorm have presented me that opportunity with “The Boys”. I was going over to do “The Boys” regardless of the exclusive. DC/Wildstorm wanted to give me incentive to focus solely on this project, and I welcome that and the benefits that an exclusive contract provides for my family.

I have enjoyed the opportunity to work on my favorite Marvel characters, it’s something I had worked to achieve over the last 20 years, all the way back to high school. However, sometimes when you get what you desire, you realize that it’s not what you truly want anymore. You set your eyes on the prize early on and everything else seems secondary.

I started to burn out this last year and I hated feeling that way. I love the Marvel characters but being yanked off this book then that book with little or no warning was demoralizing. I was being asked to draw 2 or 3 books at a time and ink myself on none of them. I felt like I couldn’t bring my “A” game to the books anymore. That’s not fair to Marvel or to the fans of my stuff.

I just wanted a gig like John Cassaday has with Astonishing X-men and Mark Bagley enjoy on Ultimate Spider-man: getting teamed with a dedicated, prolific writer on one good book, that I could nurture into a main stay. Unfortunately, I’ve had to leave Marvel to find that kind of respect for my work and the opportunity to grow as an artist.

THE PULSE: What do you think were the biggest pros to being exclusive to Marvel these past few years?

ROBERTSON: The assurance of regular work post-Transmet was great, especially with a baby boy and a desire to move from New York back home to my native California.

Joe Quesada’s enthusiasm and vision for what Marvel could be was really great to be a part of when he and Bill Jemas were driving things in a bold new direction. That first year when they dropped the code, I was living in New York and I was excited to be working with Axel Alonso and being a part of things that were changing.

I was happy to be earning a great page rate and feeling like I was part of something bigger than myself. I saw great potential for what could be done at Marvel and how I fit in. I had the chance to draw my dream books and get myself out of debt and into a home. For that, I am grateful beyond words.

I was also assured that being on top books that got a lot of promotion, like Wolverine, would be a regular benefit to being exclusive, as well as inking my own work and I believed them at first.

THE PULSE: What were the biggest cons?

ROBERTSON: I don’t want to say anything bad against the great people who employed me for four years, they are all hard working folks just doing their jobs and playing by some of the rules that I had to play by. I don’t think I was treated maliciously, just apathetically.

The rules and attitudes about the content in comics slowly started changing back to corporate safety after I went exclusive. I had come over to bring a MAX edge to Wolverine, following my success with Fury and Punisher and revamp other Marvel characters with that edge, and after the movies Spider-Man, X-Men and X2 hit huge, I found myself being told to mainstream the characters again. As a result I found my work less and less enjoyable, as Marvel seemed to not know where to put me. My enthusiasm was waning, my morale was decaying.

I simply wasn’t having fun anymore and I got the sense that I wasn’t the only one. People I really enjoyed working with and brought a lot of enthusiasm to Marvel have quit over the last few years.

I don’t work so well when I’m not having fun and feel like I need to be looking over my shoulder all the time. If I wanted a high pressure, time consuming job that I’m doing solely for the paychecks, I would have gone into advertising or something.

THE PULSE: So how long have you and Garth Ennis been working together on The Boys?

ROBERTSON: Garth approached me about doing the Boys in 2001 right after I had finished Transmetropolitan. We had enjoyed working together on Fury, and that Punisher arc and
we were developing ‘Born’. He told me the pitch and that it was a book that he really wanted to do. He said “It’s going to ‘out-Preacher’ Preacher.”

I was wild about the idea of doing a five year series with Garth. I was his fan before we got to be good friends. I had a great time doing that MAX Fury series.

I had a dilemma when Garth first offered me the book though, because that was also when Marvel had stepped up and offered me the exclusive and Wolverine. I had to choose and at the time, with a new baby and a lot of uncertainty, I couldn’t see how saying no was even possible. I went to Garth and he agreed, it was too good of an opportunity to pass up. He said supportively “No worries, mate. If not this project, we’ll do something else. I hope you’ll understand if I find another artist though.” And of course I said I would. But as the year at Marvel was met with many frustrations and set backs, I really regretted having said no.

But as I was winding down my run on Wolverine, Garth had come back to me and said “I’ve been thinking about it, and when you’re done at Marvel, would you want to do’ the Boys’ then?”

I immediately said yes. Garth told me that for whatever reasons he imagined, I specifically had to be the artist for this title. So, since then, it’s been in my mind to make this book everything I can bring to it.

THE PULSE: Who are ‘the Boys’? How did they come to work for this "secret government organization"?

GARTH ENNIS: The Boys are a CIA team assigned to watch, investigate, occasionally blackmail, now and again kick the shit out of, and when necessary kill superheroes. The whole idea is to keep super-people in line. Their leader is Billy Butcher, their newest recruit is Wee Hughie, and the other three are Mother's Milk, The Frenchman and The Female (of the Species).

Their talents and powers are simple: they excel at beating people to a pulp. Butcher, additionally, is the sneakiest and most dangerous bastard in the world.

Each member came to the team by their own path, which we'll see more of as the series progresses.

THE PULSE: Since this is a Wildstorm series are the Boys keeping track of heroes from this universe like the Authority, Wild C.A.T.s, and others in this world?

ROBERTSON: Garth and I are creating a self contained world in which ‘the Boys’ exist. Like ‘The Watchmen’, they’ll have their own continuity and rules to their universe.

THE PULSE: Why do the Boys want to do a job like this? It doesn't sound like a great thing to be "big brother" to a bunch of powerful people who, if they banded together against you, could possibly end your existence.

ENNIS: They each have their own reasons, but essentially they share an abiding dislike for and distrust of superheroes and superpower. They're more than capable of handling most superheroes; they wouldn't last long up against them otherwise.

THE PULSE: What's happening with these Boys in the first arc?

ENNIS: The first two-parter, "The Name of the Game", introduces the characters and explores their motivation. Then we move into the four part "Cherry", in which Wee Hughie learns the ropes as The Boys take down a teen superhero group called Teenage Kix. Essentially they're letting the super-community know they're back in business after an extended absence, using Teenage Kix to fire a warning shot that all superheroes will hear and heed. Simultaneously, we meet a young superheroine called Annie January AKA ‘Starlight‘ as she joins The Seven, the world's premier super team. She's got a lot to learn, too.

THE PULSE: How is working with Garth on something like this different than the collaboration you did with Warren Ellis on Transmetropolitan?

ROBERTSON: I haven’t worked with Warren in a long time. When we were starting Transmet, Warren was really open to suggestion, letting me run with ideas. I find at this early stage Garth is more engaging and specific. Garth has specific ideas about how things should be and why he wants them that way. They’re both great writers to work with, but the method behind the madness is different.

I’ve gone back and forth with Garth just getting the look on a lead character’s face just right. I kept thinking I had it and Garth was “not quite, …” and I finally sat down and sketched it nearly 10 times until I felt that I had something that fit the description Garth had given. Then I showed him and he said “That’s it. That’s Butcher.”

My philosophy with comics has always been to please three people above all. The writer, the editor and myself. I figure if those three people are happy with the work, I’ve done my job.

THE PULSE: How much freedom do you have with this series? What kind of constraints were put on you both with ‘The Boys’?

ROBERTSON: It’s a mature readers book, so Garth and I are going to be pushing things as far as they’ll let us. Garth said he’s going “Out-Preacher Preacher” and since I have more creative control and can ink my own work, I intend to top my work on Transmet. This will be the first time I can look forward to regularly inking my own work, on my characters and doing my own covers, and really setting the tone and mood for the book.

The only constraints I’ve been informed of is to be careful with the nudity.


THE PULSE: How has working on The Boys increased your creative side? Has this kind of been a real refreshing, invigorating, assignment for you to undertake?

ROBERTSON: Absolutely. I feel like I’ve been a tiger in a cage for the last few years. I believe I can finally get back on track doing the kind of work that I am passionate about. Already I can see my work flourishing with the support and enthusiasm from my editor, Ben Abernathy, who has been absolutely great to work with, Editor In Chief Scott Dunbier and my old friend, VP Hank Kanalz at Wildstorm. The kind of encouragement and freedom they’ve given me really reflects in my artwork.

Creatively, Transmetropolitan was such a great experience, and constantly under the gun at Marvel I found myself longing for the days of creator owned, creator controlled comics with a real bite. I missed having input in decisions and being listened to when I had ideas.

You know the old saying about too many cooks in the kitchen ruining the soup? When the direction changed at Marvel, I found myself longing to do something original again with fewer cooks in my kitchen.

That’s what I’m known for, what I’m good at and that’s what I am enthusiastically returning to.

THE PULSE: When is the first issue of The Boys coming out?

ROBERTSON: October of 2006!

THE PULSE: What, if anything, else are you working on? You seem to have your creative hand in a few pools sometimes.

ROBERTSON: For the first time in my career, I am devoted to only one thing: This book. When I have the first arc completed and the book well on track, I may start pitching some more creator owned ideas with writers I have wanted to work with that aren’t mainstream names yet, like Adam Mortimer and Gary Whitta.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Boys makes its debut this October from Wildstorm.

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#26 JasonT

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 12:01 AM

Thanks for the interviews, Spiderlegs.

QUOTE (Darick Robertson)
My philosophy with comics has always been to please three people above all. The writer, the editor and myself.


Do editors actually care anymore?

#27 James

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 12:28 AM

QUOTE
ROBERTSON: It’s a mature readers book, so Garth and I are going to be pushing things as far as they’ll let us. Garth said he’s going “Out-Preacher Preacher” ....

The only constraints I’ve been informed of is to be careful with the nudity.


What the...?

#28 Abhimanyu

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 12:36 AM

QUOTE (James @ Mar 24 2006, 07:28 PM)
QUOTE
ROBERTSON: It’s a mature readers book, so Garth and I are going to be pushing things as far as they’ll let us. Garth said he’s going “Out-Preacher Preacher” ....

The only constraints I’ve been informed of is to be careful with the nudity.


What the...?


My sentiments exactly. THe first two sentences don't quite jibe with the third. And if its a mature readers book, what exactly is wrong with nudity??
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#29 Lou K

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 12:38 AM

This is sounding better and better as we go.
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#30 wolvy

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 01:11 AM

QUOTE (Abhimanyu @ Mar 24 2006, 04:36 PM)
QUOTE (James @ Mar 24 2006, 07:28 PM)
QUOTE
ROBERTSON: It’s a mature readers book, so Garth and I are going to be pushing things as far as they’ll let us. Garth said he’s going “Out-Preacher Preacher” ....

The only constraints I’ve been informed of is to be careful with the nudity.


What the...?


My sentiments exactly. THe first two sentences don't quite jibe with the third. And if its a mature readers book, what exactly is wrong with nudity??


Probably means that he can't make it X-rated nudity. Tone it down a bit too the R rated type of stuff. Tho he can run wild with the violence and everything else.
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#31 Abhimanyu

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 04:54 AM

Well, that seems redundant because obviously the nudity isnt going to be X rated. I'm yet to see a Wildstorm/DC comic with X rated levels of sexual content. This seems to say that even too much of the R level stuff is unacceptable.

All this echoes the moronic tendency in movies to demonize nudity when over the top violence (which im a huge fan of, granted) is considered quite acceptable.
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#32 Christian

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 05:19 AM

he he....I like that tendency too!
It popped up again in comics recently.

Cover art for an issue of "Conan" depicted a nude woman on the cover (not sure what all it showed or anything). There was a decree that putting pictures like that in Conan are just unacceptable because of the children reading the book.
Dave (friend who owns comic store) and I were joking, "Holy hell! They've gone and done it! They've ruined the good wholesome fun of guys with swords chopping each other's heads off for my son!"
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#33 wolvy

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 05:23 AM

Guys, this Garth "Look at that dudes brains splattered on the ground" Ennis we're talking about. He does not need reasoning or logic. Not to mention he's a crazy, hard drinking, hard fighting, hard farting Irish man. So that should be enough for you.
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#34 St. Finn Parish

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 06:43 AM

icon_2gun.gif fuck yeah icon_2gun.gif fuck yeah oh and  icon_mgun.gif FUCK YEAH!!!!
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Posted 25 March 2006 - 04:18 PM

Abhi, I'm pretty sure Darick's tongue was firmly in his cheek--he most likely winked when he said it, too. The thought behind it being that the two of them will be pushing the envelope damn near out of the mail bag, so to speak. Expect alot of "fucking fuck fuckers" dialogue, brain spatters accompanying testicles ripped out by fish hooks simultaneously experiencing an orgasm and the death of a close friend seconds apart.

Darick's really excited about it because this is the same type situation as when he did TRANSMET, under which he thrived big time! His mood is better recently than it has been since last spring or to about when his youngest was born. He's not as bitchy, in other words...and his enthusiasm is very evident.

#36 JohnMcMahon

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 06:23 PM

QUOTE (James @ Mar 25 2006, 12:28 AM)
QUOTE
ROBERTSON: It’s a mature readers book, so Garth and I are going to be pushing things as far as they’ll let us. Garth said he’s going “Out-Preacher Preacher” ....

The only constraints I’ve been informed of is to be careful with the nudity.


What the...?


That's typical Americana though, isn't it ?  

Violence and swearing's a-ok, long as you keep them sinful cocks and cunts under wraps (titties are ok, no more than five an issue though).
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Posted 30 March 2006 - 05:12 AM

QUOTE
WIZARD WORLD L.A., DAY TWO: DARICK ROBERTSON IS BRINGING “THE BOYS” TO TOWN
by Stephen J Stanis, Guest Writer

Dead babies, virgins, racial tensions, covert operatives, blood, sex, violence and a different take on the superhero genre are all parts of the Vertigo and Wildstorm universes. Saturday, at Wizard World Los Angeles, DC Comics VP of Sales Bob Wayne, along with a slew of Wildstorm and Vertigo writers, editors and artists, including Jim Lee, discussed the events ahead.

The biggest news was the announcement of a new Wildstorm series written by Garth Ennis and drawn by Darick Robertson, “The Boys.” Starting in October the monthly series will focus on a world where the government monitors the superhero community and sometimes sends in a team to take them down.

“I’m really excited about this project with Garth. … This is a great opportunity because Garth and I are really good friends. I think when you read a book that is a collaboration of friends you get their sense of humor and that kind of stuff comes through,” Robertson said.

Robertson said the 60 issue, 5 year-series will follow a character named Huey who joins the world of “The Boys,” a team of government operatives charged with monitoring and if need be dealing with the superheroes of the world. Robertson and Wildstorm executive editor Dunbier said that while the superheroes in the world may reflect some established characters, they are not the ones you know.

“’The Boys’ on the team, each in their own way has suffered some sort of tragedy at the hands of superheroes,” Robertson said. “(The superheroes) in our world move through the world like celebrities and politicians combined. They don’t really notice who they step-on on the way during the course of their super battles. This is what happens to the people who end up as collateral damage.”

Robertson said the leader of “The Boys” is Billy Butcher, “the meanest, hardest son of a bitch you can ever imagine.” Starting with issue #1, however, readers will see this world through the eyes of Huey.

“Throughout this series you are going to see Huey get initiated into this dark world,” he said. “The CIA needs the boys to be on our side to get information on superheroes and sometimes they need to take down superheroes who get out of line. They don’t necessarily always do this with violence sometimes they do it with blackmail, sometimes they do it by knowing their deep dark secret.”

Robertson said Ennis has said, “The Boys” will “Out ‘Preacher’ ‘Preacher.’”


#38 Josh

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 11:16 AM

QUOTE (JohnMcMahon @ Mar 25 2006, 12:23 PM)
QUOTE (James @ Mar 25 2006, 12:28 AM)
QUOTE
ROBERTSON: It’s a mature readers book, so Garth and I are going to be pushing things as far as they’ll let us. Garth said he’s going “Out-Preacher Preacher” ....

The only constraints I’ve been informed of is to be careful with the nudity.
What the...?
That's typical Americana though, isn't it ?  

Violence and swearing's a-ok, long as you keep them sinful cocks and cunts under wraps (titties are ok, no more than five an issue though).

Unfortunately yes, that's it.

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 11:41 AM

QUOTE (DarickRobertson.com)
Issue one will all drawn by April 10th, and Garth has already written through issue 4 so You'll be getting a steady reliable dose of our best stuff every month (Twice the first month, as we're double shipping 1 & 2 in October)


#40 James

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 11:51 AM

Ace. Here's hoping it's another Hitman - although I suspect that the characters won't be as likeable as Tommy and Natt.




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