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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/21/2017 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/the-creator-of-constantine-reflects-on-his-epic-hellblazer-run-30-years-later "I guess I did want to write a different type of comic: one that gained its impetus from the horror – largely social and political – shared and hopefully understood by both its characters and readers," says Delano.
  2. 5 points
    Juan Ferreyra, who did covers for the New 52 Constantine series, has been periodically posting John drawings he does in his free time to his twitter. Some of them:
  3. 4 points
    C'mon, Ixnay. You're only fakin' that achin' for Chaykin. It's the thought of Nick Necro that's got you shakin' the bacon.
  4. 3 points
    The good news is that DC's Huntress is going to be the guest-star in the next story-arc. That's what the Hellblazer fan-base has been awaiting. I'm glad I've put all this behind me. It's hilarious that John Constantine (one of the greatest characters ever created in comics) is so far below the quality level of a Snagglepuss comic book. Imagine if a time traveler were to go back to 1988 and tell someone this, he would never be believed. Ah, how the mighty have fallen.
  5. 3 points
    Also, what classic stories do today's comic readers have to look back on? Older readers had: "The Galactus Trilogy" "The Dark Phoenix Saga" "Dangerous Habits" Now..... "Iron Man gets written out-of-character in Civil War." "Spider Man gets written out-of-character in One More Day". "Captain America gets written out-of-character in Secret Empire." "John Constantine spends twelve months looking for the Djinn." No wonder less and less people care about comic books (or, mainstream comics, at least) all the time.
  6. 3 points
    John McCrea's recent #inktober tribute to Steve Dillon in the form of John
  7. 3 points
    He could just do the Constantines Past issues.
  8. 3 points
    I've said before that Carey's finale is probably my favorite ending to any Hellblazer run, in spite of the occasionally bumpy road leading up to it. "R.S.V.P." has a sense of finality to it, and I feel that in retrospect, if there was a place to satisfactorily end Hellblazer during its original run - this would be it. Looking forward to seeing what you make of the final three original Hellblazer runs.
  9. 3 points
    That said, I really couldn't have seen Ellis doing a Freezes Over or Hard Time, and it wouldn't have been beyond him (having quit the book in a tantrum over having an ill timed, but far from brilliant story pulled) to produce something over a forty issue run that made all that made all of the dogfucking and sweetly musky balls nonsense look like The Dead Boy's Heart by comparison.
  10. 2 points
    Sean Phillips posted this variant cover on Twitter: I can't get the current version of the forum software to embed Sean's tweet, so what you're looking at is my scaled-down version. The original in all its Phillipsian glory can be seen at https://twitter.com/seanpphillips/status/936642752263147520 He's also tweeted work-in-progress shots of other variant covers.
  11. 2 points
    I can't believe there's never been a "What If...?" story that featured Frank Castle becoming Ghost Rider. It almost writes itself: Castle loses his family, becomes possessed by the Spirit of Vengeance after making a deal with the Devil. That's almost exactly what he did at the end of "Born" actually, it was just another (possible) entity, if not just Frank's own crazed mental state.
  12. 2 points
    I always thought a "What if..." Frank Castle became Deathlok book would have been cool.
  13. 2 points
    I've mentioned here in different threads that I'm a big fan of James Robinson. While not everything he writes is good (or even readable, looking at you "Cry For Justice"), he's a writer that I always make time for even if I'm not a fan of the characters he's writing, like with his current Wonder Woman run. His work on Grendel, Scarlet Witch, Batman, the JSA...all solid to really great work. Starman, though, holds a place in my heart that's unmatched by any other comic series, it's easily my favorite completed comic work. I used to make it a point every 2 or so years to go back and re-read Starman from start to finish, a task that was made a whole lot easier when DC released the six Omnibus volumes. While I was always drawn in by the way Robinson tied everything in the series together during the epic "Grand Guignol", and I certainly recognized the dramatic beats he was hitting as the series wrapped up, it's only been in recent years that I've truly felt and understood the emotional impact of that last year plus of the series. My last read-through of the series was back in 2013, and as I was making my way through the volumes my father was diagnosed with terminal stomach cancer. A prognosis of 6 months turned into death after 6 weeks, and my dad passed away while I was smack-dab in the middle of "Grand Guignol". I wasn't able to finish reading the series, I don't want to spoil anything for people who haven't read it, but it hit me so hard emotionally and the wound of my dad's death was so raw that it colored my opinion on the series. It wasn't just an expertly and intricately plotted superhero series, it was now one of the saddest and most bittersweet conclusions I'd ever read. It was only a few months ago that I decided to read the series through again, for the first time in 4 years. Now, though, the way I'm relating to Starman has changed once again. Instead of looking at it as a son dealing with the death of my father, I'm now a father myself. Starman was ultimately about the relationship between father and son, and while the end of "Grand Guignol" (and the final issue) is still bittersweet and brings up tons of depressing memories it also reminds me that it wasn't long after losing my father that I gained my son. In that way, Jack Knight became my avatar, and the series itself is a testament to how comics as a medium can touch someone deep in their soul. And god damn could Tony Harris draw the hell out of that comic.
  14. 2 points
    Bendix is a shouty angry slaphead: of course Ellis enjoys writing him.
  15. 2 points
    ...to Janina Ramirez, about Fairy Feller's Master Stroke and Norse Myths https://www.historyhit.com/podcasts/the-art-detective/
  16. 2 points
    https://www.scribd.com/mobile/document/167293208/Swamp-Thing-Meets-Jesus-by-Rick-Veitch-and-Michael-Zulli-Art
  17. 2 points
    I couldn't remember, nor be bothered to search for, the thread that had us all talking about Rachel Pollack's run on Doom Patrol (and Elizabeth Hand's Anima series), so I figured I'd stick this here. Really interesting interview with Pollack about her Doom Patrol run and the editorial/critical reception of it at the time. No big surprise that Axel Alonso taking over as editor when Lou Stathis died is what ultimately forced her out of Vertigo. https://www.newsarama.com/37024-rachel-pollack-talks-doom-patrol-prose-writing-and-making-a-return-to-comics.html
  18. 2 points
    Nice quote in there from Lou Stathis: "If Vertigo can't publish Rachel Pollack, what's it for?"
  19. 2 points
    Here's an interview I did with DeMatteis many years ago about his Ghost Rider run. I'll say it again, guy was so genuine and appreciative to talk about work he did 20 years ago (at that time). My goal is to get him on the podcast at some point as well, I'll squee like a fangirl in heat if that happens. Vengeance Unbound - J.M. DeMatteis Interview
  20. 2 points
    To be fair, that sort of thing is why we have a superego standing over our id with a blunt implement in its hand and a stern look in its eyes... (I think rather than a buried desire of Constantine's that was supposed to be his ousted shittiest bits exploiting Gemma's fantasies in pursuit of forced sex, though. At least, I hope it was.)
  21. 2 points
    Those are some really good points, Robinson does tend to mine the past of his characters, and that was one of the more damning aspects to Diggle's run. I'd counter, though, with the notion that Diggle's continuity dredging wasn't what made his run so forgettable, it was that he regurgitated past minutia while simultaneously sacrificing character moments for plot mechanics. I don't think Robinson would do that, because in his better works like Scarlet Witch and especially Starman, he grounded the series in heavy character pieces while also laying down all of the plots for his endgame. Robinson would bring the character's heart and humanity back, instead of just sending him on neverending quests. Or he'd write something like Justice League: Cry for Justice and make me look like a fucking idiot for suggesting him in the first place. It's a toss up.
  22. 2 points
    Yes, which shows that it can be hard to predict how well a writer will do writing a John Constantine story. Jason Aaron is a great writer, yet he wrote one of the worst Hellblazer stories.
  23. 2 points
    The Kickstarter is finally live! Be sure to pledge and spread the word through social media of all types, friends and family, etc. Any type of support would be greatly appreciated! And for anyone who missed out on the first volume, given that the book is sold out, you'll also be able to pledge for a copy of the first along with the new one! www.kickstarter.com/projects/1942007293/isnana-the-were-spider-volume-2
  24. 2 points
    That's very true, but in most cases (thinking mainly about Transmet) the ranting was at least in some service to a story. "Shoot" was shoehorned into a series that it didn't belong, even with the hamfisted justification for Constantine being involved at all. "My mate's son was taken to America, got shot in a school, RAAARRGGHH!". Not Ellis or Hellblazer's finest moment. Had it been released as planned, it would have been a mite bit controversial but ultimately a small piece of a much larger run. Banning it from being published built it up into this mythic thing that it doesn't deserve to be.
  25. 2 points
    i mean shitting out of the mouth of his characters is like 45% of whats appealing on ellis' as a writer
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