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Luís

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About Luís

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    Portugal
  1. Luís

    Big books of comics

    The living sperm is stupid indeed, and the dolphins really went nowhere. But I've also changed my mind about the series over time. The Max Thunderstorm issue was a brilliant way of bringing back thought balloons to comics! (Un)fortunately I've never read The Invisibles, so no comparisons here. But it ties nicely with Grant's comics meta-narrative found in Doom Patrol and Animal Man. Grant has said he has more plans for Seaguy, but I wish he'd leave that annoying little comic in criogenic sleep and go back to the world of The Filth instead.
  2. Luís

    Big books of comics

    Adolf is a 5-part manga by Osamu Tezuka, one of the pioneers of manga in post-war Japan. Check them out on Amazon.com. It's supposed to be a very good work of sequential art.
  3. But did the doctors know Superman's powers come from the sun? How much do humans know about him? I almost avoided this movie, until a friend assured me that it was really good. Some minor criticisms aside, it delivered a damn good superhero story; the Messiah subtext everyone was complaining about, I didn't even see it. And Brandon Routh wasn't as wooden as in the trailers: I was afraid he'd act too seriously, but nope, this was far from grim and gritty. And kudos to James Marsden for jumping from one successful franchise to another. He must have felt exhilarated that his character was for once useful and integral to the plot. I'm eager for a Bryan-Singer-directed sequel, but please keep Lex out of it; I feel bad saying this because Kevin Spacey rocked and didn't make the character act like a clown, a la Gene Hackham; but just let the man stay on his island with his coconuts, Kitty and the little dog, and get some new villain for variety's sake!
  4. Luís

    Big books of comics

    Lee and Kirby brought Him back in a 1969 Thor story. Him tries to mess around with Sif, Thor goes berserk and beats the crap out of him, then launches him into space. That's how the High Evolutionary finds him years later and names him Adam Warlock. Christian, is the AS you're talking about The Life and Times of Harvey Pekar? The Half-Aryan is the 3rd volume in the series; are you collecting it, Josh? How's the inside art? The covers always looked beautiful.
  5. Luís

    Big books of comics

    Oh yes it is :happy: just whisper it, Christian... The Ultimate Nullifier! What's sad is that over-exposure and treating Galactus as a villain and not an amoral Force of Nature hasn't done him any good over the years. I always liked those Silver Surfer issues when the ex-herald would visit his former master for some good advice. Adam Warlock, although Lee/Kirby created him, surely owes more to Jim Starlin's cosmic psychedelic madness of the '70's. And I don't know why, but I have some fondness for Roy Thomas and Gil Kane's Counter-Earth saga.
  6. Luís

    Geniuses

    Ah Josh, it can be fun sometimes. Christian mentioned Gore Vidal a while ago; some of his book articles are more interesting than the books themselves. And speaking of Warren Ellis now, although I have zero patience for his comics output nowadays, I'm always ready to read his commentaries on the medium. 'Come In Alone' was a fun read. Ditto for Steven Grant.
  7. There was a link to this in Steven Grant's column last week. I hope this guy spends the rest of his life on this!
  8. Luís

    Geniuses

    Piss off, Mark, that happened 4 pages ago! Alas, I admit my error and I hereby capitulate. Luís :icon_twosgun:
  9. Luís

    Geniuses

    Uh, Mark, I was actually answering to dogpoet's: I thought my last qip about CP being Simon and Kirby's baby had clarified who I was adressing. Notice that he said 'chosen medium', and superheroes last I checked aren't a medium in themselves, much to the chagrin of John Byrne, I guess. So, yes, the matter of international influence plays a lot of importance here. As a matter of fact, you didn't specificy anything about superheroes: your only comment about Kirby after my post, unless something was deleted while I slept, was this: And the word 'superhero' is... where? Specified where? What, Western comics are now superhero comics? Europe and South America migrated to Asia? You should perhaps rephrase it as 'history of North American comics', you might speak the truth that way :wink:
  10. Luís

    Geniuses

    I was being tongue-in-cheek about Mr. Barks, that shouldn't have been difficult to understand. But I won't deny my affection for this wonderful wonderful man: I've surely read more Uncle Scrooge stories than Spiderman's in my early childhood And don't dodge the main point: what about art in other continents? What influence did Kirby have there? As for the 'newspaper strips', you'd only wish modern comics had the size and the artistic quality of Mr McCay's newspaper strips. A newspaper strip is a three-panel gag running along the width of a newspaper page, and usually printed on the last page. The Little Nemo I read is an album-sized hardcover book with an ongoing narrative running over a 100 pages. If that's not a comic, my friend, then it's what comics should be! Incidently, it up until recently it wasn't uncommon for European comics to be published one page at the time in periodicals and collected afterwards, just like LN. So there's that precedent too.
  11. Luís

    Geniuses

    James' post upthread led me to assume he considered Garth a genius, but he actually includes him in the 'above average' which is a categorisation I can live with. That takes care of one fan, James is critical; excellent, comics surely need more critical fans. Now I dare you to tell me you haven't read somewhere else on the net, on other message boards, countless fans considering the most mediocre comics writers geniuses, Garth included :huh: And I disagree that Kirby is the most influential comics artist ever. I've said it twice, I'll say it again: without Winsor McCay, there probably wouldn't be Eisner and Kirby; if he's not a direct influence, he's at least important for being a pioneer and predating them for 30 years. You surely underestimate the importance of Little Nemo. Kirby's art influenced American comics, but art in South America and Europe evolved from different sources. Also, bringing up once more the greatest cartoonist in History, the one and only Carl Barks, what visible influence did The King have on him? And yes, Captain America was created by Joe Simon and Mr. Kirby, dogpoet ;)
  12. Luís

    Geniuses

    In any case, trying to claim that your opinion is superior to everyone else's because a bunch of self-declared literary experts agree with you is rubbish. Your opinions stand alone. Everyone's opinions stand alone. ...fuck, I took him seriously. Ah, you always do, poor poor James But I actually meant that my opinion is meaningless, not superior; that's the thing: we're just a bunch of fanboys in a message board talking about who's a genius and who's not, but in the end we're just talking about favourites. Well, I got a lot of favourite writers who aren't considered literature, and I can't do anything about it because I'm not one of the people who gets to decide that; I'm not part of Academia. My point about Marquéz and Roth is that they're not good because I say so; they're good because of the arbitrers of art in our society say so, independently of my insignifcant opinion, and because society respects those mysterious people. From what I can tell, Garth Ennis is only a genius because a couple of fans say so. Surely other comics creators think so too, but society in general couldn't give a fuck about what Peter Milligan thinks of Garth Ennis because society doesn't give a fuck about Peter Milligan's existence either. People these days talk a lot how comics are mainstream, but it's really just because they're sprinboards for occasionaly successful movies. Deep down, it's still a ghetto medium. And for the record even if Alan Moore said that Garth Ennis is the greatest writer in the world, I'd still only see an immature one-trick pony with a knack for toilet humor and violence, which is great to to read, but no moe than that
  13. Luís

    Geniuses

    Mediocre, average most of them. Exception due to Alan Moore, and I might agree on Neil Gaiman on a good, but I wouldn't put anyone else, no Peter Milligan, no Grant Morrison, no Warren Ellis, no John Wagner definitely no Jack Kirby on the same sentence as Gabriel García Márquez, Philip Roth, whatever literary figure you care to think about, who are not just considered good by me but by a body of people who actually know a thing or two about art in general. I'll keep saying it: they're mediocre, higher than bad, but hardly close to good. They're like the writers of 'Lost' and 'The Shield' (my favourite TV show at the moment) and '24': good at plot twists, gripping suspense, cool dialogue and cliffhangers, but can't produce anything worth calling art. Honestly, Jack Kirby? Fantastic Four? Captain America? Are you seriously? What, the New Gods?
  14. Luís

    Geniuses

    I'll give Mr Spiegelman the benefit of the doubt, not having read Maus yet. But if he's a genius, he's the I'll-spend-a-decade-producing-another-masterpiece type of genius a la James Joyce or Thomas Pynchon. What else has he done since the rat story? As delightful as it is to browse his cartoon about the WTC in the bookstore, it's really just an album-sized cartoon, isn't it The more I think about it, the more I see it like this: actual literary comics genius (writers), based on what I know of comics, only Alan Moore meets my standards, and he's not the type to rest on his laurels; he's been putting out good stuff regularly for 20+ years now. Someone said upthread that we focused more on writers here than artists, but I can actually think of more art genius: Winsor McCay, Will Eisner, Moebius, Alberto Breccia. They've all pushed the envelope, art-wise, and they're all mediocre writers. McCay can't do characterisation, you've only got to (try to) read Little Nemo to see that; he can't do dialogue either. I gave up quickly and just paid attention to the pretty colors and layouts. But I don't doubt that he's historically important and an influence. Will Eisner, perhaps he got better with age, but The Spirit is just worth it for the art, isn't it? Good Artists are naturally attracted to comics, but we're stuck with pretty average writers.
  15. Luís

    Big books of comics

    Seaguy is such a piece of rubbish, Mark I can't blame Morrison for having wild ideas, because they are usually pretty good; but I can blame him for lack of discernment. And I can surely blame Karen Berger for not telling him to get off his high horse and go edit some more... a lot more, like starting from scratch.
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