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Christian

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Everything posted by Christian

  1. Christian

    Carlos Ezquerra

    It looks like he did the third issue, with Pugh on the rest, based on cover credits.
  2. Christian

    Carlos Ezquerra

    You had to hunt down the Quality Comics reprints from the 1980s to get good Judge Dredd over here. It took me a while to find out about the Quality Comics books. They weren't something that everyone just knew existed. The Quality Comics were pretty easy to find and not a lot of money though, once you knew for what to look.
  3. Christian

    Image Comics

    Cool. Hope you enjoy Kot as much as I do.
  4. Christian

    Flashpoint/New 52 and Beyond

    Damn, you are impressive, Rich! I gave up trying to be a JC completest after the finish of the original Hellblazer series, only buying books that interest me now. If you don't know every JC appearance, I don't know who ever would, as I got all my information for the complete list of JC appearances off of your site. I give you all the credit in the world for keeping up with this. It's obviously not the Vertigo days, when JC only appeared in a select few titles, and it was easy to hunt down every JC appearance. Now, he's like Wolverine.
  5. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    William Gibson's script for Aliens 3 is going to be adapted in to comic form and published by Dark Horse. Personally, I'm glad we got the version of Aliens 3 we did, instead of the Gibson plot. I am a fan of Aliens 3, and rank it the second best of the entire Aliens franchise, after the original (I'm not sure if I'm counting Prometheus or not, because I'm still frankly not sure how much I love Prometheus, if that makes any sense). I don't understand why a lot of people don't enjoy Aliens 3, as it works very well. It was a dark and claustrophobic movie. I've noticed that there are quite a number of fans who love Aliens 3 too, so I guess the hatred of it is overblown. It's funny that science fiction writers are expected to be predicting the future, yet I don't think one science fiction writer was able to predict that the USSR would no longer exist in the future. Not that I give the "science fiction writers are trying to predict the future" idea a lot of merit. Most of them are really writing about the present, with an occasional very prescient look at how the future of society will take shape. Yet, it's especially funny that Gibson wrote his script based around explaining what happened to the "Eastern bloc" countries as his Aliens 3 premise during the late-1980s. It wouldn't be very long after that point when the USSR collapsed. Looking back, it looks a lot better for the Alien franchise that they didn't end up having one of their movies being an outdated "Cold War" narrative. The franchise looks a lot more farseeing. Plus, the Aliens 3 we got served as a fitting ending for Ripley*, which is what the trilogy should have revolved around, whereby Gibson's script wouldn't have given us a finale for Ripley's story. *Yes, I realize what Aliens Resurrection foisted upon the world. That was just plain a horrible movie, and why most people think of it as the "Aliens trilogy".
  6. Christian

    Image Comics

    Oh, I don't think I even realized it was canceled. I thought that Kot intended it as a mini-series. I wasn't really enjoying it. I don't think I was really paying attention after the first issue. I thought it was meant to have the four different plots converge and make some sort of whole statement, and it never really came together. I could see people enjoying Material a lot, it just left me feeling alienated from most of the plots. Not because they didn't all work together, like I thought, but because most of the plots didn't interest me, and I didn't get enough of the one plot which I did find worth following.
  7. Christian

    Image Comics

    It's been a long time. I think I did enjoy it at the time, but I also believe it was Kot's first comic book work (or at least anything worth noting). I think he definitely outgrew some of his tendencies that were found in Change. There's nothing wrong with the series. It was pretty wild. It just had the marks of a writer starting out and trying really hard to put as much as he could in to his first project. He'd channel that manic insanity and turn in a lot better work later, but Change is definitely a fun romp, although I found it somewhat inconsequential also. I wouldn't judge Kot by that series though. If you hate it, don't hesitate to give something else by him a chance. If you absolutely love it, imagine a writer taking all those ideas he's throwing at the page, and crafting it down to a comprehensive quality.
  8. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    Lou, you'll be interested to know that I read that Lemire has a Cthu-Lou one-shot coming up in December. It's the story of Cthu-Lou's daughter, Cthu-Louise, being a high school student.
  9. Christian

    Image Comics

    I'm not the biggest fan of action sequences carrying a story, myself, but that's ok. Kot's New World (Image) may soon join this list, after it's completed. It's a five-issue min-series, which is still on-going though, and unlike my first recommendation, I'd like to see where it goes before I give it my nod. Right now though, it is looking like it'll make the list. It's another dystopian future science fiction comic, but not as dark and despairing as his Days of Hate. OK, Ales Kot recommended reads..... I think Days of Hate (Image) may be his best work, but that's still on-going, so you'll probably want to wait until the series finishes before picking it up. It's pretty obviously meant to be a critique of the current Trump America, but it's not topical. It's more of a dystopian science fiction story, about a future America that is always possible and just around the corner, rather than some ham-fisted whining about how bad Trump is. Probably after Days of Hate, I'd recommend Wolf (Image), with some reservations. If you love John Constantine, if you love political Hellblazer stories, and if you feel that JC stories have been bland and ill-fitting for about a decade now, you'll love Wolf. So, what are the reservations? Well, Kot never finished the book. However, if you like Ellis, once again, there are a lot of similarities between Ellis and Kot! Going back further....one of Kot's earliest series (and the first one that caught reader's attention) was Zero (Image). It's a meditation on human violence, filled with an increasing psychedelic plot-line. On the same wavelength is Winter Solder (Marvel). Now, I know what you may be thinking about a Marvel comic, but this is not a superhero comic. It's a far future science fiction story that is just plain weird, and it serves as Kot's appeal to peace. It's truly a beautiful piece of work. You don't really need to know anything about the Winter Soldier as a character either, other than it's Bucky Barnes. Your mileage may vary, but James Bond: The Body (Dynamite) is pretty much the best Bond story I've ever read. I'm not really a fan of Bond, and once again, I thought Ellis' work on James Bond was pretty much the high-point of the character in comics....until I read Kot's mini-series. It's very political. OK, moving back to Marvel for one more series is Kot's run on Secret Avengers. OK, I know. This may be a hard sell, but trust me. It's insane! The entire story ends up being one big homage to a Jorge Luis Borges story. I am not kidding. It's about as far from typical Avengers fare as you can get, while still being nominally a superhero comic book. Generation Gone (Image) is another unfinished Kot series, but he plans to return for a second story-arc to wrap up the book next year. I didn't think I'd really enjoy this one, but it's quite good. It takes place in an economically depressed dystopian future, and deals with the rage and frustration of younger people facing an uncertain future. It also mixes science fiction and superhero comics. It's something of a deconstruction of the superhero genre, ala Alan Moore. Now, these next two are Kot comics I did not enjoy, but that you may want to check out, if you like Warren Ellis and hard science fiction. These two series are science fiction comics done right, but I'm not the biggest fan of these types of plots, myself. The Surface and Material, both from Image. So, if you like hard science fiction stories, with lots of future tech, that will remind you of Warren Ellis, I would not hesitate to recommend these two series, even though I did not find them really my cuppa.
  10. Christian

    Marvel's One World Order

    Sorry, this is going to get political. I see that in the new issue of Captain America, Ta-Nehishi Coates joins the choir. It's become a truism among Democrats and liberals here in 2018 that the United States was a great land until the coming of Donald Trump. As if America really was everything that it promised on the tin until that evil "third positionist" Trump took power. Now, that wonderful, mythic America is being lost. In the newest issue of Captain America, Coates sings a paean of a quainter, better, more innocent time in America after the end of World War II. When everything that America did was good and positive. I am especially incensed with a man like Coates taking up their refrain, considering his father. Ta-Nehishi should definitely know better, if anyone should. Everything his father was fighting against that was wrong in America, and everything that his father was fighting for to try to help America become. The funniest (or most sickening) aspect of this whole revisionist history is that Donald Trump is saying the exact same things. That America used to be so much better in the 1950s and 1960s, and all that was lost. Trump wants to bring back those mythical halcyon days. Hey, just like the Democrats and liberals like to daydream about those "good old days" back in the 1950s and 1960s, when everything was better, and Donald Trump wasn't president. One should be careful of what ones wishes. It wasn't long ago, during the bad old George W. Bush days (and they were incredibly bad days, indeed), when patriotism was the most fashionable to wear it had been in years, and liberals spent their time speaking out against this type of "blind patriotism", pointing out that "true patriotism" (your mileage may vary here) was based around the knowledge that no country is ever perfect and every country can improve. It's sad to see Coates join this same tired bandwagon, forgetting everything for which his father once stood. No, America was never perfect. Those glorious days after World War II when all Americans lived in a virtual utopia, segregation still existed. The government supported blood-thirsty dictators around the world. Sodomy was still punishable by the death sentence in most states. Something like the Tuskegee experiments was considered an acceptable federal policy. It was only a short few years before we'd see the Vietnam War. The far Right in Charlottesville accused "Leftist radicals" of wanting to erase America's past when the government decided to tear down those Confederate war memorial statues. Let's not allow this falsehood to become the truth. Let's never forget the past. If you want a truism, then let's remember George Santayana.
  11. Christian

    Marvel's One World Order

    You know that mega-event known as Secret Wars that Marvel has been promoting for months now? How it was the biggest event in Marvel's history? Well, it's two months away from being over. So, it's time for Marvel to go in to hype mode about the All-New, All-Different Marvel Universe that comes after Secret Wars! Are you burnt out yet? I wonder why.... Starting in September, Marvel has announced the first batch of new releases for the new Marvel Universe post-Secret Wars. Iron Man by Brian Bendis.... All New, All Different Avengers by Mark Waid A-Force by G. Willow Wilson Uncanny Avengers by Gerry Duggan New Avengers by Al Ewing-I'll be checking this out. Dr. Strange by Jason Aaron-This is the big hit for the new launches! This should be amazing! Captain Marvel returns, but with a new creative team.... Captain America is still Sam Wilson, now written by Nick Spencer Totally Awesome Hulk....Seriously, that's the title...by Greg Pak Aaron's Thor is back. Scarlet Witch by James Robinson-Might be worth buying, or it might be awful. Illuminati...No. Vision Contest of Champions by Al Ewing-Not sure if this is an ongoing or what Slott is still writing Amazing Spider Man...Yawn! Carnage by Gerry Conway....Seriously. Spider Man-This is the Ultimate version of Spider Man. So, two Spider-Men in the Marvel Universe now. Spider Man 2099 is still around. Whoops! Three Spider-Men, I stand corrected. Oh, OK. Here's why. Web Warriors...a team made up of all the different Spider characters. Yawn. Charles Soule is the new writer on Daredevil. It doesn't look good. Back to dark 'n' gritty DD, it appears. Drax by C.M. Punk...I'm not making this up! Honest! Nova Venom:Spaceknight....Again. Seriously. I'm not lying! Howling Commandos....OK, this looks like fun. I'll check this out. SHIELD Uncanny Inhumans-Already announced. Karnak by Warren Ellis....Weird! This will definitely be worth a look. But...weird. Squadron Supreme by James Robinson-Definitely worth a look. X-Traordinary X-Men by Jeff Lemire-I'll have to buy this, because it's Lemire. But, I don't want to just based on the name alone. Old Man Logan, also by Lemire. Ugh. I don't think I can even do this for Lemire. Also, All-New Wolverine, which is X-23 as Wolverine. Ugh! There was also supposed to be a Red Wolf series, but I don't see it announced yet. I hope it has a good writer.. Basically, sounds like the same old shite, with a few good books thrown in.
  12. Christian

    Carlos Ezquerra

    I'm sure it will merit a mention in the different comic news outlets. It'll probably gain the same attention as most of the recent deaths from the comic book world, like poor Gary Friedrich, at the very least. Judge Dredd was a pretty popular character over here too. Dredd had a crappy movie, and there were the Batman/Dredd team-ups., and a number of reprints of the British stories. Plus, he also did artwork with Garth Ennis on a few projects, and Ennis is a pretty big name. I don't think Strontium Dog is as well know over here, sadly. I really enjoyed those 1980s Alan Grant stories. I think that series and Nemesis were my two favourite on-going series from 2000 AD.
  13. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    No, we didn't have to read Shane in school. Yeah, the story in Russell's Lone Ranger is about the conflict between free rangers and ranchers wanting strict property rights. With Russell, and the Ranger of course, coming down firmly on the side of leaving the land open. It's similar to the conflict in The Octopus, where ranchers and small farmers are given common cause to resist the encroachment of monopolies against individuals. I hadn't seen any fiction writers touch on the creation of barbed wire and how that had an effect on social organization, the way Russell is doing. I thought that made Russell's political commentary stand out.
  14. Christian

    Marvel's One World Order

    Oh, OK. I did read that Bendis story, but have no memory of it, obviously. I just remember all the Nocenti stories using Typhoid Mary. At least this writer didn't just mess up continuity.
  15. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    Are they tropes of the western genre? As I said, I'm not particularly a fan of westerns. I read some of the old Marvel Westerns, and I've read a few books by A.B. Guthrie and did read Treasure of the Sierra Madre (as the author was an anarchist), but it's not my thing. I took Guthrie and B. Traven's novels to be more an exception, due to Traven's politics and Guthrie's concern for preserving the ecology of a wild west, as opposed to seeing the west becoming commercialized. I thought that usually, based on some of the TV shows and movies I have caught over the years, it seemed like good lawmen trying to preserve law and order in town against outlaws with no respect for the law or property, and sometimes fights with unruly Injuns, who can't understand the white man's civilized ways, seemed to be the main tropes of the genre. It seemed like ranchers were usually portrayed as positive figures too. Even in The Octopus by Left-Wing Frank Norris, which I grant wasn't really a western (coming along a bit late in 1901, but dealt with western US political concerns), the ranchers were portrayed as some of the protagonists against the evil, corrupt railroad trusts. It also seems that a lot of the westerns tend to glorify the confederacy as a better way of life, and I thought that Russell's comments from the aspiring senator were meant to be something of a meta-commentary on that motif....especially with the "the only thing that's changed is do we buy them or just rent?".
  16. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    Jason-I don't disagree with your assessment of the comic, at all. It's just that I'm not all that big a fan of westerns, and the Lone Ranger as a character is pretty boring. He's a Captain America type, always do the right thing, be stoic and keep your chin up figure. There just really isn't anything interesting to do with the character, himself. He's a cardboard cut-out serving the interests of the plot. That's not anything against Russell or this comic book, it's just a statement in general about the Lone Ranger, himself. I do disagree with you about the politics. They were pretty apparent and in-your-face. I doubt anyone would miss the politics of the story. I'm not sure how you can read the scenes with the aspiring senator, and claim that the politics were subtle. Especially, when he described his vision of the cotton plantation as the ideal America. There's nothing wrong with that, as that was what the plot was about. It wasn't pandering or preachy. The plot is just overtly political, and that aspect was interesting. I like that Russell dealt with an area of political history that isn't so well known today. It was a lot better than another story about racism against former-slaves or the genocide of Native Americans. Not that there's anything wrong with those topics, as they are important issues, of course. However, those parts of history have been covered to death in fiction and are so obvious. There isn't much new to be done with that aspect of that period of American history.
  17. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    Lone Ranger #1 (by Mark Russell)-I'm of two minds on this one. On the one half, it's still a well-written Russell comic book. On the other half, I'm not sure how interested I am in a comic which is, at the end of the days, still a "western" story, even with the strong politics. I will give Russell a lot of credit for digging up an interesting bit of history, involving the creation of barbed wire. The politics were done very well. I just don't know if I care about the Lone Ranger enough to continue reading this story. It's going to be an odd one, in that I give it a good review, and find it worthy, yet I don't see myself continuing to read it.
  18. Christian

    Marvel's One World Order

    X-Men: Black #1 (by Chris Claremont)-Hey, what do you know? A Marvel comic I didn't end up regretting. This was the best work I've seen from Claremont in ages. He seemed motivated by current political concerns. He still has a tendency to be very verbose, while lacking the poetic prose which made it so much more tolerable in his classic period. However, this came the closest to reading like prime Claremont since the early-1990s. It was very much a political allegory story, but featured that humanism given to Magneto that no other writer is able to capture. There was strong characterization, emotion, a point to the story....it worked very well. I wouldn't mind adding this to my Claremont Uncanny X-Men collection as a coda. It opens with a tired Magneto, feeling he's lived too long. It ends with a Magneto who has gained a new perspective and feels that there is hope....yet, it ends with a warning note from Homo Sapiens which seems to take things back to the beginning of the story, that it's all very tiring, to see how little progress has truly been made in all these years. It makes me wish that Claremont was writing this entire series, but perhaps it's best to see this return to form from Claremont one last time, and not have to worry about seeing him failing to relive his glory days again.
  19. Christian

    Marvel's One World Order

    I wonder what is going on at Marvel behind the scenes right now. That Typhoid Mary one-shot came out this week. It was scheduled to be written by Max Bemis, but at the last minute, Marvel changed the writer to Clay Chapman (whoever he is? A playwright I guess, looking online). Also, I paged through the issue, and since when is Typhoid Mary a former soap opera actress? Her back-story was that she was sexually abused as a child and became a prostitute in order to lure men to her to get revenge for what was done to her as a child. She was never a soap opera actress. Plus, since Anne Nocenti is back writing comics at the moment, it would have been nice to get Nocenti to write the Typhoid Mary comic. Maybe Nocenti wasn't interested, of course. I definitely would have bought that book. Next, I read that the Chelsea Cain Vision mini-series (featuring Viv Vision, the daughter of the Vision from the Tom King series) was canceled out of nowhere. Cain said it wasn't due to any delays, as she and the artist were both completely on schedule. Marvel just dropped the book suddenly. I wonder why? I'm not that concerned about either comic (didn't plan to buy either), but it makes me wonder what is happening at Marvel now.
  20. Christian

    DC Comics

    Yeah, she was a pretty interesting character in her initial appearances under Dini, but the character today bears pretty much zero resemblance to the original interpretation. I do wonder, since I didn't follow DC as closely as Marvel, how Harley went from "former psychiatric nurse who falls in love with the Joker" to "bad-ass chick hanging out with superteams". It's an evolution that doesn't make any sense for the character.
  21. Christian

    DC Comics

    She's become DC"s answer to Deadpool. No one is sure why they got so popular, a lot of readers are annoyed by the characters, but yet both companies continue to push both characters very heavily.
  22. Christian

    Comics Shipping the Week of October 1st 2018

    I'm going to wait for the softcover edition of the Morrison Wonder Woman. I bought the first book the week it came out, and it wasn't worth that price. I can wait. Lone Ranger #1-This is written by Mark Russell, who is one of my current favourites, so I want to see what he does on a book like this, which I would not ordinarily read. I'll probably check out X-Men: Black-Magneto #1, because it's written by Chris Claremont. Not that I expect anything from Claremont at this point in his career. OK, honestly, he probably hasn't written anything worth reading since 1993. Still, Claremont writing a Magneto story.
  23. Christian

    Other comics we read recently

    Are you reading Anne Nocenti's The Seeds? That's a Berger Books I am enjoying. It's looking to end up on my list of "best comics of 2018". Such a year of highs and lows. There were so many poorly done comics littering the stands in 2018, it seems to be more and more of those every year. However, those few comics which hit the high point in 2018 were just masterfully done. I'd like to see a bit more quite good comics making up a middle ground, or see a lot more comics in that sections of extreme highs, but those few truly stand-out comics save 2018 from being so dismal. Anyway, comparing anything to McKeever's The Waiting Place makes me interested in what I am missing. I might have to check out She Could Fly now.
  24. Christian

    DC Comics

    Yeah, I didn't want to mention it, but the artwork didn't look right for Liam Sharpe either. His artwork usually looks a lot better than this. It must be the inker is hurting the quality. Either that, or he was rushing to meet a deadline. I still don't see how Morrison and Shape could ever go wrong on a comic.... I'll definitely give the first issue a chance....because, could a Morrison book really be as bad as the preview pages make it appear? That would be a shame if DC published the worst couple of pages from the entire issue for their preview, and the book gets "wicked shredded!!!" (see what I did there?*) on the next page. *Yeah, I'm not even really sure what that means. Otherwise, if DC published that preview, and I didn't know Morrison was writing the book, I would think, "Another poorly written DC superhero book. Skip!".
  25. Christian

    Norm Breyfogle

    Comic artist Norm Breyfogle died on September 24th. That came as a huge shock to me, as he wasn't very old. Breyfogle will always be immortalized, in my eyes, as the artist with Alan Grant on his (to my view) definitive take on Batman. If you haven't read that 1980s Detective Comics and Batman run, and you love Batman or just comics in general, then you need to hunt down that period of Bat-history now. Amazing work. Plus, he did artwork on another of Grant's best comic book work, the Anarky mini-series. Breyfogle was the artist who drew Grant's story originally introducing the character. Another absolute must read. Here is J.M. DeMatteis' post on Breyfogle (where I discovered the news): http://www.jmdematteis.com/2018/09/remembering-breyfogle.html
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