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Christian

Marvel's One World Order

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If the writers they have aren’t bringing in more profit, then it’s not a big loss. Marvel is just keeping around a roster of mediocre talents.

I mean, if Marvel’s sales figures were at record levels, I could agree that relying on tenured talent is an acceptable business model. Marvel’s sales have been terrible for years, so it might be time to attempt more competitive ideas.

Sometimes it can be a good thing to lose a creator who a company has milked as much as possible. Losing Bendis should be seen as a positive for Marvel. Even if a person is a fan of Bendis, they could still probably agree, as Bendis hogging the top slot at Marvel for so many years opened the door for new names to step up. Bendis was just stagnating at Marvel.

Unforunately, those new names reaching the next level include names like Slott.

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They try to push names they can get on exclusive contracts even if the names aren't any good. It's not a healthy situation, but they'll keep it up until it stops working. I'd suspect Marvel are making a lot more from cross marketing their intellectual property than they are from publishing comics at the moment anyway, and just see those as a marketing tool for the films.

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I know. That's exactly true. It shows how big business stifles creativity. They aren't doing the best job in the market, far from it, and they're actually struggling a great deal as far as actual readership sales figures. However, they have the money to publish more books than anyone else in the business, plus they have the outside marketing which is worth far more than their actual original business model (publishing comic books). It allows them to coast, and take the easiest path, and not worry about trying to truly compete in the marketplace. If they had better people running the actual company, interested in publishing good comics with creativity, they could be doing far better with their actual original business model (again, publishing comic books). It simply doesn't matter. They truly could get robots to turn in a comic book story every month, and as long as Disney is able to profit off of blockbuster movies and merchandising deals, it wouldn't matter in the slightest. Unless Marvel Comics itself is bleeding money (rather than just seeing regularly declining sales year-on-year), the company has no incentive for change. Once again, this will never happen, because of the percentage of the market that Marvel has cornered by flooding the market with comic series. They can keep pumping out ten new series every month, and some readers are going to buy those books, which adds up in the long-term. Not to mention that their bottom-line is padded by "special events", which fuel the speculator market, and help offset the fact that Marvel's core of monthly titles can barely crack the top ten monthly sales chart. Marvel Comics is hardly selling anywhere close to the amount of comic books they were selling in the 1980s, but it simply doesn't matter. I believe the statistics show that the highest selling Marvel Comic (not counting special issues, that drive speculators to inflate the sales) today is selling below what the lowest selling Marvel Comic was selling in the mid-1980s.

Let me add that I do understand why Marvel Comics is more interested in the far more lucrative world of movies. Comics are just priced outside of the ability of most young people to be able to collect today. The comic book audience is an aging one, with people aged mid-30s through 50 being the average demographic for regularly reading monthly comic books. I understand that an aging market is the worst thing in the world for this type of business. Eventually, we'll die off, and there aren't new fans coming along who are replacing us aging readers. Plus, that age group isn't truly even the prime demographic for having expendable income, as 30s are usually the age where people are having children and buying houses. Not to mention, most of us started out reading comic books as children and haven't been able to let go, but how many people are there our age who didn't just stop reading comics in their 20s? It's a very niche market now. So, it makes sense. Parents and young adults will spend money to see a movie at the cinema once a month, or whenever. People who have no interest in bothering to follow a superhero comic will have no problem spending some free time watching the movies. It's just a sad statement about the comic book industry, because the comic book medium, as it currently exists now, will eventually die off.

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Oh. is everyone ready for the next X-Men relaunch? It's coming at the end of this year. Apparently, Marvel has run out of colours for naming their X-line, and so has decided to get rid of all of those books, and replace them with a weekly new Uncanny X-Men title, much like Marvel did to many yawns with the Avengers last year.

First up though, there will be X-Men: Black spinning out of the pages of Extermination, featuring a team of X-villains. The big news about X-Men: Black is that Chris Claremont will return to Marvel once again, just before the next relaunch. What's that? Once you name a title black, there's no going back? Ah, so that's why Marvel is forced to give up their dreams of a rainbow of X-Men titles.

The creative team Marvel has picked for the relaunch isn't exactly inspiring either, if they want this to seem like a big deal. Matthew Rosenberg might be a decent writer, but he's a pretty new name to comics, and doesn't have a huge hit to encourage fans that he's going to bring something special to this book. 

Rosenberg has been currently writing the Astonishing X-Men series (Marvel must not realize there is a colour green, even though they publish a comic book about the Hulk....), so he's getting promoted to the lead writer of the X-line now, I guess.

Marc Guggenheim seems to be on his way out of Marvel now. Unfortunately, Guggenheim was the best name they could find to helm the flagship of the X-line for the last relaunch.

Ed Brisson and Kelly Thompson are the other two creators who will be helping handle the weekly schedule. Again, Thompson is fine, but not a name that's going to bring in fans. Brisson I have usually found to be a pretty minor writer.

At least the Avengers book had Mark Waid and Al Ewing, and it still failed to garner any acclaim, before the "Brand New Start" relaunch.

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I've been on the outs with Marvel again, I know. However, I see that they are bringing back the Defenders in December, in a series written by Al Ewing. I don't see how anything could go wrong with that. I do mean The Defenders too, yes....Dr. Strange, Hulk, Sub-Mariner, and Silver Surfer. Not whatever Marvel was trying to pass off as "Defenders", due to some TV show.

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It's very wrong of me, Christian, but I'm increasingly visualising Marvel as your abusive boyfriend. :wink2:

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They won’t do it again. It was only for sales. They didn’t really mean it. Things will get better. 

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I wonder what is going on at Marvel behind the scenes right now.

That Typhoid Mary one-shot came out this week. It was scheduled to be written by Max Bemis, but at the last minute, Marvel changed the writer to Clay Chapman (whoever he is? A playwright I guess, looking online).

Also, I paged through the issue, and since when is Typhoid Mary a former soap opera actress? Her back-story was that she was sexually abused as a child and became a prostitute in order to lure men to her to get revenge for what was done to her as a child. She was never a soap opera actress.

Plus, since Anne Nocenti is back writing comics at the moment, it would have been nice to get Nocenti to write the Typhoid Mary comic. Maybe Nocenti wasn't interested, of course. I definitely would have bought that book.

Next, I read that the Chelsea Cain Vision mini-series (featuring Viv Vision, the daughter of the Vision from the Tom King series) was canceled out of nowhere. Cain said it wasn't due to any delays, as she and the artist were both completely on schedule. Marvel just dropped the book suddenly. I wonder why?

I'm not that concerned about either comic (didn't plan to buy either), but it makes me wonder what is happening at Marvel now.

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X-Men: Black #1 (by Chris Claremont)-Hey, what do you know? A Marvel comic I didn't end up regretting. This was the best work I've seen from Claremont in ages. He seemed motivated by current political concerns. He still has a tendency to be very verbose, while lacking the poetic prose which made it so much more tolerable in his classic period. However, this came the closest to reading like prime Claremont since the early-1990s.

It was very much a political allegory story, but featured that humanism given to Magneto that no other writer is able to capture.

There was strong characterization, emotion, a point to the story....it worked very well. I wouldn't mind adding this to my Claremont Uncanny X-Men collection as a coda.

It opens with a tired Magneto, feeling he's lived too long. It ends with a Magneto who has gained a new perspective and feels that there is hope....yet, it ends with a warning note from Homo Sapiens which seems to take things back to the beginning of the story, that it's all very tiring, to see how little progress has truly been made in all these years.

It makes me wish that Claremont was writing this entire series, but perhaps it's best to see this return to form from Claremont one last time, and not have to worry about seeing him failing to relive his glory days again.

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On 10/3/2018 at 6:56 PM, Christian said:

I wonder what is going on at Marvel behind the scenes right now.

That Typhoid Mary one-shot came out this week. It was scheduled to be written by Max Bemis, but at the last minute, Marvel changed the writer to Clay Chapman (whoever he is? A playwright I guess, looking online).

Also, I paged through the issue, and since when is Typhoid Mary a former soap opera actress? Her back-story was that she was sexually abused as a child and became a prostitute in order to lure men to her to get revenge for what was done to her as a child. She was never a soap opera actress.

Plus, since Anne Nocenti is back writing comics at the moment, it would have been nice to get Nocenti to write the Typhoid Mary comic. Maybe Nocenti wasn't interested, of course. I definitely would have bought that book.

Next, I read that the Chelsea Cain Vision mini-series (featuring Viv Vision, the daughter of the Vision from the Tom King series) was canceled out of nowhere. Cain said it wasn't due to any delays, as she and the artist were both completely on schedule. Marvel just dropped the book suddenly. I wonder why?

I'm not that concerned about either comic (didn't plan to buy either), but it makes me wonder what is happening at Marvel now.

Brian Bendis made Typhoid Mary a soap opera actress during his run on Daredevil, it's where she was when the Kingpin "reactivated" her Typhoid personality.  Why he went with "soap actress" as a natural professional progression for Mary, who was so shy and passive it bordered on catatonia, I have no idea.

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Oh, OK. I did read that Bendis story, but have no memory of it, obviously. I just remember all the Nocenti stories using Typhoid Mary. At least this writer didn't just mess up continuity.

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Bendis assimilates continuity rather than destroying it: he's a borg not a klingon.

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Sorry, this is going to get political.

I see that in the new issue of Captain America, Ta-Nehishi Coates joins the choir.

It's become a truism among Democrats and liberals here in 2018 that the United States was a great land until the coming of Donald Trump. As if America really was everything that it promised on the tin until that evil "third positionist" Trump took power. Now, that wonderful, mythic America is being lost.

In the newest issue of Captain America, Coates sings a paean of a quainter, better, more innocent time in America after the end of World War II. When everything that America did was good and positive.

I am especially incensed with a man like Coates taking up their refrain, considering his father. Ta-Nehishi should definitely know better, if anyone should. Everything his father was fighting against that was wrong in America, and everything that his father was fighting for to try to help America become.

The funniest (or most sickening) aspect of this whole revisionist history is that Donald Trump is saying the exact same things. That America used to be so much better in the 1950s and 1960s, and all that was lost. Trump wants to bring back those mythical halcyon days. Hey, just like the Democrats and liberals like to daydream about those "good old days" back in the 1950s and 1960s, when everything was better, and Donald Trump wasn't president.

One should be careful of what ones wishes. It wasn't long ago, during the bad old George W. Bush days (and they were incredibly bad days, indeed), when patriotism was the most fashionable to wear it had been in years, and liberals spent their time speaking out against this type of "blind patriotism", pointing out that "true patriotism" (your mileage may vary here) was based around the knowledge that no country is ever perfect and every country can improve.

It's sad to see Coates join this same tired bandwagon, forgetting everything for which his father once stood.

No, America was never perfect. Those glorious days after World War II when all Americans lived in a virtual utopia, segregation still existed. The government supported blood-thirsty dictators around the world. Sodomy was still punishable by the death sentence in most states. Something like the Tuskegee experiments was considered an acceptable federal policy. It was only a short few years before we'd see the Vietnam War.

The far Right in Charlottesville accused "Leftist radicals" of wanting to erase America's past when the government decided to tear down those Confederate war memorial statues. Let's not allow this falsehood to become the truth. Let's never forget the past. If you want a truism, then let's remember George Santayana.

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