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Christian

Marvel's One World Order

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If the writers they have aren’t bringing in more profit, then it’s not a big loss. Marvel is just keeping around a roster of mediocre talents.

I mean, if Marvel’s sales figures were at record levels, I could agree that relying on tenured talent is an acceptable business model. Marvel’s sales have been terrible for years, so it might be time to attempt more competitive ideas.

Sometimes it can be a good thing to lose a creator who a company has milked as much as possible. Losing Bendis should be seen as a positive for Marvel. Even if a person is a fan of Bendis, they could still probably agree, as Bendis hogging the top slot at Marvel for so many years opened the door for new names to step up. Bendis was just stagnating at Marvel.

Unforunately, those new names reaching the next level include names like Slott.

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They try to push names they can get on exclusive contracts even if the names aren't any good. It's not a healthy situation, but they'll keep it up until it stops working. I'd suspect Marvel are making a lot more from cross marketing their intellectual property than they are from publishing comics at the moment anyway, and just see those as a marketing tool for the films.

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I know. That's exactly true. It shows how big business stifles creativity. They aren't doing the best job in the market, far from it, and they're actually struggling a great deal as far as actual readership sales figures. However, they have the money to publish more books than anyone else in the business, plus they have the outside marketing which is worth far more than their actual original business model (publishing comic books). It allows them to coast, and take the easiest path, and not worry about trying to truly compete in the marketplace. If they had better people running the actual company, interested in publishing good comics with creativity, they could be doing far better with their actual original business model (again, publishing comic books). It simply doesn't matter. They truly could get robots to turn in a comic book story every month, and as long as Disney is able to profit off of blockbuster movies and merchandising deals, it wouldn't matter in the slightest. Unless Marvel Comics itself is bleeding money (rather than just seeing regularly declining sales year-on-year), the company has no incentive for change. Once again, this will never happen, because of the percentage of the market that Marvel has cornered by flooding the market with comic series. They can keep pumping out ten new series every month, and some readers are going to buy those books, which adds up in the long-term. Not to mention that their bottom-line is padded by "special events", which fuel the speculator market, and help offset the fact that Marvel's core of monthly titles can barely crack the top ten monthly sales chart. Marvel Comics is hardly selling anywhere close to the amount of comic books they were selling in the 1980s, but it simply doesn't matter. I believe the statistics show that the highest selling Marvel Comic (not counting special issues, that drive speculators to inflate the sales) today is selling below what the lowest selling Marvel Comic was selling in the mid-1980s.

Let me add that I do understand why Marvel Comics is more interested in the far more lucrative world of movies. Comics are just priced outside of the ability of most young people to be able to collect today. The comic book audience is an aging one, with people aged mid-30s through 50 being the average demographic for regularly reading monthly comic books. I understand that an aging market is the worst thing in the world for this type of business. Eventually, we'll die off, and there aren't new fans coming along who are replacing us aging readers. Plus, that age group isn't truly even the prime demographic for having expendable income, as 30s are usually the age where people are having children and buying houses. Not to mention, most of us started out reading comic books as children and haven't been able to let go, but how many people are there our age who didn't just stop reading comics in their 20s? It's a very niche market now. So, it makes sense. Parents and young adults will spend money to see a movie at the cinema once a month, or whenever. People who have no interest in bothering to follow a superhero comic will have no problem spending some free time watching the movies. It's just a sad statement about the comic book industry, because the comic book medium, as it currently exists now, will eventually die off.

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Oh. is everyone ready for the next X-Men relaunch? It's coming at the end of this year. Apparently, Marvel has run out of colours for naming their X-line, and so has decided to get rid of all of those books, and replace them with a weekly new Uncanny X-Men title, much like Marvel did to many yawns with the Avengers last year.

First up though, there will be X-Men: Black spinning out of the pages of Extermination, featuring a team of X-villains. The big news about X-Men: Black is that Chris Claremont will return to Marvel once again, just before the next relaunch. What's that? Once you name a title black, there's no going back? Ah, so that's why Marvel is forced to give up their dreams of a rainbow of X-Men titles.

The creative team Marvel has picked for the relaunch isn't exactly inspiring either, if they want this to seem like a big deal. Matthew Rosenberg might be a decent writer, but he's a pretty new name to comics, and doesn't have a huge hit to encourage fans that he's going to bring something special to this book. 

Rosenberg has been currently writing the Astonishing X-Men series (Marvel must not realize there is a colour green, even though they publish a comic book about the Hulk....), so he's getting promoted to the lead writer of the X-line now, I guess.

Marc Guggenheim seems to be on his way out of Marvel now. Unfortunately, Guggenheim was the best name they could find to helm the flagship of the X-line for the last relaunch.

Ed Brisson and Kelly Thompson are the other two creators who will be helping handle the weekly schedule. Again, Thompson is fine, but not a name that's going to bring in fans. Brisson I have usually found to be a pretty minor writer.

At least the Avengers book had Mark Waid and Al Ewing, and it still failed to garner any acclaim, before the "Brand New Start" relaunch.

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I've been on the outs with Marvel again, I know. However, I see that they are bringing back the Defenders in December, in a series written by Al Ewing. I don't see how anything could go wrong with that. I do mean The Defenders too, yes....Dr. Strange, Hulk, Sub-Mariner, and Silver Surfer. Not whatever Marvel was trying to pass off as "Defenders", due to some TV show.

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It's very wrong of me, Christian, but I'm increasingly visualising Marvel as your abusive boyfriend. :wink2:

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They won’t do it again. It was only for sales. They didn’t really mean it. Things will get better. 

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I wonder what is going on at Marvel behind the scenes right now.

That Typhoid Mary one-shot came out this week. It was scheduled to be written by Max Bemis, but at the last minute, Marvel changed the writer to Clay Chapman (whoever he is? A playwright I guess, looking online).

Also, I paged through the issue, and since when is Typhoid Mary a former soap opera actress? Her back-story was that she was sexually abused as a child and became a prostitute in order to lure men to her to get revenge for what was done to her as a child. She was never a soap opera actress.

Plus, since Anne Nocenti is back writing comics at the moment, it would have been nice to get Nocenti to write the Typhoid Mary comic. Maybe Nocenti wasn't interested, of course. I definitely would have bought that book.

Next, I read that the Chelsea Cain Vision mini-series (featuring Viv Vision, the daughter of the Vision from the Tom King series) was canceled out of nowhere. Cain said it wasn't due to any delays, as she and the artist were both completely on schedule. Marvel just dropped the book suddenly. I wonder why?

I'm not that concerned about either comic (didn't plan to buy either), but it makes me wonder what is happening at Marvel now.

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X-Men: Black #1 (by Chris Claremont)-Hey, what do you know? A Marvel comic I didn't end up regretting. This was the best work I've seen from Claremont in ages. He seemed motivated by current political concerns. He still has a tendency to be very verbose, while lacking the poetic prose which made it so much more tolerable in his classic period. However, this came the closest to reading like prime Claremont since the early-1990s.

It was very much a political allegory story, but featured that humanism given to Magneto that no other writer is able to capture.

There was strong characterization, emotion, a point to the story....it worked very well. I wouldn't mind adding this to my Claremont Uncanny X-Men collection as a coda.

It opens with a tired Magneto, feeling he's lived too long. It ends with a Magneto who has gained a new perspective and feels that there is hope....yet, it ends with a warning note from Homo Sapiens which seems to take things back to the beginning of the story, that it's all very tiring, to see how little progress has truly been made in all these years.

It makes me wish that Claremont was writing this entire series, but perhaps it's best to see this return to form from Claremont one last time, and not have to worry about seeing him failing to relive his glory days again.

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On 10/3/2018 at 6:56 PM, Christian said:

I wonder what is going on at Marvel behind the scenes right now.

That Typhoid Mary one-shot came out this week. It was scheduled to be written by Max Bemis, but at the last minute, Marvel changed the writer to Clay Chapman (whoever he is? A playwright I guess, looking online).

Also, I paged through the issue, and since when is Typhoid Mary a former soap opera actress? Her back-story was that she was sexually abused as a child and became a prostitute in order to lure men to her to get revenge for what was done to her as a child. She was never a soap opera actress.

Plus, since Anne Nocenti is back writing comics at the moment, it would have been nice to get Nocenti to write the Typhoid Mary comic. Maybe Nocenti wasn't interested, of course. I definitely would have bought that book.

Next, I read that the Chelsea Cain Vision mini-series (featuring Viv Vision, the daughter of the Vision from the Tom King series) was canceled out of nowhere. Cain said it wasn't due to any delays, as she and the artist were both completely on schedule. Marvel just dropped the book suddenly. I wonder why?

I'm not that concerned about either comic (didn't plan to buy either), but it makes me wonder what is happening at Marvel now.

Brian Bendis made Typhoid Mary a soap opera actress during his run on Daredevil, it's where she was when the Kingpin "reactivated" her Typhoid personality.  Why he went with "soap actress" as a natural professional progression for Mary, who was so shy and passive it bordered on catatonia, I have no idea.

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Oh, OK. I did read that Bendis story, but have no memory of it, obviously. I just remember all the Nocenti stories using Typhoid Mary. At least this writer didn't just mess up continuity.

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Bendis assimilates continuity rather than destroying it: he's a borg not a klingon.

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Sorry, this is going to get political.

I see that in the new issue of Captain America, Ta-Nehishi Coates joins the choir.

It's become a truism among Democrats and liberals here in 2018 that the United States was a great land until the coming of Donald Trump. As if America really was everything that it promised on the tin until that evil "third positionist" Trump took power. Now, that wonderful, mythic America is being lost.

In the newest issue of Captain America, Coates sings a paean of a quainter, better, more innocent time in America after the end of World War II. When everything that America did was good and positive.

I am especially incensed with a man like Coates taking up their refrain, considering his father. Ta-Nehishi should definitely know better, if anyone should. Everything his father was fighting against that was wrong in America, and everything that his father was fighting for to try to help America become.

The funniest (or most sickening) aspect of this whole revisionist history is that Donald Trump is saying the exact same things. That America used to be so much better in the 1950s and 1960s, and all that was lost. Trump wants to bring back those mythical halcyon days. Hey, just like the Democrats and liberals like to daydream about those "good old days" back in the 1950s and 1960s, when everything was better, and Donald Trump wasn't president.

One should be careful of what ones wishes. It wasn't long ago, during the bad old George W. Bush days (and they were incredibly bad days, indeed), when patriotism was the most fashionable to wear it had been in years, and liberals spent their time speaking out against this type of "blind patriotism", pointing out that "true patriotism" (your mileage may vary here) was based around the knowledge that no country is ever perfect and every country can improve.

It's sad to see Coates join this same tired bandwagon, forgetting everything for which his father once stood.

No, America was never perfect. Those glorious days after World War II when all Americans lived in a virtual utopia, segregation still existed. The government supported blood-thirsty dictators around the world. Sodomy was still punishable by the death sentence in most states. Something like the Tuskegee experiments was considered an acceptable federal policy. It was only a short few years before we'd see the Vietnam War.

The far Right in Charlottesville accused "Leftist radicals" of wanting to erase America's past when the government decided to tear down those Confederate war memorial statues. Let's not allow this falsehood to become the truth. Let's never forget the past. If you want a truism, then let's remember George Santayana.

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With Marvel's 80th Anniversary coming in 2019, Marvel is bringing back some of their genre anthology titles from the 1970s.

There is going to be a horror anthology book titled Crypt of Shadows, with Al Ewing writing it.

A sci-fi anthology titled Journey into Unknown Worlds, with Cullen Bunn writing it.

Plus, a war story anthology titled War is Hell, with Howard Chaykin on writing and artwork for the lead story.

All three sound like they're very much worth a look.

And, Marvel is bringing back Marvel Comics Presents, and Anne Nocenti is one of the writers. She may be writing a Captain America serial.

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Haven't been reading much new Marvel books, aside from checking up on what Al Ewing is doing in Immortal Hulk.

The most Marvel I've read lately was the Marvel Epic Collection version of Kraven's Last Hunt. As these Epic Collections collect more than just the title story, fulfilling the role that the Essentials used to, Kraven's Last Hunt is placed at the very end of the book. The story that precede it are:

1. An annual featuring Spider-Man taking on a time-traveling Iron Man 2020 - this is my first time encountering the IM of the "far-future" of 2020 and I'm assuming that the writers intended him to be a "sympathetic but ultimately unlikable" anti-hero at best. The grimness of the Iron Man 2020 bits don't mesh too well with comedic misfortunes of Peter Parker, but I can't say that I completely disliked this romp and it did have a rather hard-hitting ending. Wonder if they'll have to change him to Iron Man 2040 if someone ever wants to use this character again?

2. Spider-Man vs. Wolverine, written by Christopher Priest before the name change to trick the other Priest's fans into buying his comics. It's not Priest's greatest work, but it's an affable contrast between the traditional superheroics of Spidey vs. the edgy and gritty anti-hero types like Wolverine that were all the rage, and also the token appearance of the classic Red and Blue Spidey outfit as he wears the black suit in the rest of these stories. The fallout of this story segues into the Hobgoblin Identity storyline, as Spidey angsts about and ponders giving up superheroics. Peter David handles the big identity reveal issue (well, before the identity revealed here got retconned) while Priest contributes to a few issues that further flesh things out.

3. And aside from Kraven's Last Hunt, Marvel clearly intended this to be the attraction of the collection since it's mentioned on the back: the Spider-Man marriage! And while Peter and MJ together is fine and dandy, David Michelinie takes over the writing for these issues and fails to make much of a case for them. A boring issue of Spider-Man zipping around while contemplating proposing, followed by a boring two-parter of Mary Jane pondering whether to say yes while concurrently dealing with family drama as the Spider-Slayer chases Spidey around. Followed by the marriage annual itself, which consists of Peter and MJ pondering for its entirety if they should go through with the wedding before they do. Now I'm nostalgic for the Spider-Marriage since that was the status quo when I started reading Spider-Man but given the general dullness with which the actual marriage storyline comes across, I can kind of see why Marvel editiorial was bent on splitting them up. Though maybe I'm just missing the historical context/significance reading this years later in a trade.

(funny how J. Jonah tells Peter that there's no turning back from a marriage! I guess J. Jonah didn't factor deals with the Devil into that equation!)

Kraven's Last Hunt definitely overshadowed everything in this trade, writing and art-wise.

Also collected was a bunch of supplementary material from the time talking up the Spider Marriage, most of which I ended up skimming over. Of greatest note is a magazine that collects the entirety of Stan Lee's newspaper strip's version of the marriage.

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Iron Man 2020 was used to much better effect in the Machine Man mini-series from the 1980s, with plotting and artwork from Barry Windsor Smith.

I didn't enjoy that Annual either. I thought Iron Man 2020 was used wrong. He seemed to be more heroic than he was portrayed in the Machine Man mini.

It's an alternate year 2020. It's what would have happened had Mitt Romney been elected president. Then, Baintronics would have risen up to dominate the corporate world by the year 2020.

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In other news - Peter Milligan and Mike Allred are back with new X-Statix! I think it's a big one-shot if i remember correctly, not sure it's been formally announced, but yay!

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Immortal Hulk #11-So, even though my law-suit against Marvel for spousal abuse is still on-going, I thought why should I punish myself by avoiding one of the best comic books currently on the stand, written by one of my favourite writers, just because it requires me to buy a Marvel Universe series every month?

I am so glad I gave in and started reading this comic again. This is the perfect point to start picking up the book again, with Hulk in Hell.

A letter writer published in this issue made me realize something. This really is very similar to Alan Moore coming on Swamp Thing.

No, this direction won't stick as the new status quo, and there was already a definitive Hulk run by Peter David, so it's not the exact same.

However, Ewing is revitalizing the Hulk concept in the same way as Moore did with Swamp Thing. If this run followed on from the original Lee/Kirby Hulk issues, it could be read in the same manner as what Moore accomplished with Swamp Thing. He has distilled the dark elements lurking in the background of those Lee/Kirby issues and unleashed pure horror and madness from the concept.

This is, without a doubt, the best that a Hulk comic has been since somewhere in the middle of the David run, when he started to lose momentum. The whole David run is worth reading, but the high quality of the first chunk of his run is lost at some point. It's a shame that a lot of readers who would enjoy this comic won't ever give it a chance because it's Marvel's Hulk, so it can't ever hold up as a stand-out horror comic book.

 

Conan the Barbarian #1-Jason Aaron was, of course, a good choice to write a Conan book. I can't think of any current comic writers better suited to writing Conan than Aaron, except for Cullen Bunn, who already wrote the character at Dark Horse.

Aaron is writing Conan similar to his Thor, only without the nobility.

However, I can't see myself continuing to read the comic. A lot of discussion has gone on about the current state of comic books and their ever-declining sales. I don't think a reason that is given enough credence is due to overly-long story-arcs. Until the year 2000, for the most part, comic book stories (or superhero ones anyway) were mostly self-contained, usually with building sub-plots and sometimes an over-arching character plot-thread. You would read the story that month and the next month you'd move right along to another exciting story. After all, it's not like the complexity of (99.99% of) these stories is at the level of War and Peace. A month is a nice wait between issues of a comic book. Well, if you have a six-part story-arc, that takes up half of a year worth of the comic. Plus, how excited are you to read each installment of this one complete story-arc? You probably get bored with parts two, three, and four usually. I know I quite often do. "Oh, another issue of Iron Man? And, it's part 3 of this story-arc? And, there are still three more chapters to go? Yawn!". Of course, some stories truly do need the breathing room, and that's perfectly fine too, but it's a rare occasion that the typical mainstream superhero comic book needs five issues to tell its simple story.

Which brings me back to Conan. This issue was going really well, as it seemed like Conan had wrapped up everything in a nice, neat bow at the end of the story. Oh wait, no. The story is still going on. What's this? The story isn't over. It's going to keep going. Yawn.

There was a perfectly fine Conan story contained within this first issue. Conan is not the "great literary novel". Roy Thomas did perfectly fine writing a lot of Conan stories which took up exactly one issue of the comic, before you moved on to Conan's next exciting adventure. There was no reason to drag out the plot for more issues. There were some exceptions, sure, but it wasn't the rule.

Now, every comic has to be five or six parts. I think it just wears the reader out. No one wants to read a six-part story-arc where Iron Man fights Blizzard. It can easily be accomplished in one issue.

On the plus side, it does seem like Aaron is taking a page from his Thor run and is going to be skipping around in Conan's time-line, with some stories featuring King Conan.

I do like that Marvel is playing off of their original Conan comic book with this series too. The best part is that the reader won't have to see the original Robert E. Howard fiction adapted to comic books for a third time (after Dark Horse re-did all those stories again).

So, there are some positives to the new Conan series, but I don't believe it is enough to get me to stay interested in this Conan comic.

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Marvel Comics Presents #1-Geez, that was a complete waste of $4.99. Ugh, that was probably the worst Anne Nocenti story she ever wrote.

A Captain America story by Nocenti, and it's not political? What a waste.

That wasn't the worst of it though, as the story read like a G.I. Joe PSA from the 1980s.

This was just terrible. I can't believe this was Anne Nocenti's return to Marvel, to write this one horrible short story.

There was a Namor story by Greg Pak which was ok. It didn't make up for my paying $4.99 for a terrible comic book, but that story wasn't bad, it just wasn't worth the price.

 

Conan #2-I am glad that I decided to buy this. I take back my complaints from the first issue. Aaron knew what he was doing, and did not let me down. This was an excellent Conan story.

Aaron has an over-arching story running in the book, but it's not as simple as chapter one, to be continued, chapter two (as per my initial complaints). The stories, at this point, can be read as mostly self-contained.

I'd recommend checking out this comic if you want a really well-told Conan story. I was impressed.

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I caught up on the Uncanny X-Men relaunch up through this week's issue # 10, and boy howdy is it a fucking mess.  The Avengers creative teams did a pretty great job with this weekly one-series gimmick during "No Surrender" last year, but the X-Men teams have really struggled to make this anything other than a 3 issue story stretched out waaaaaaay too fucking long.  And at the end of the day, this 10-issue relaunch is nothing but a trailer for another crossover event.  So very disappointing that Marvel just can NOT get the X-Men right, that franchise has been fucked for years now.  

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It looks like Marvel is back to "no more mutants" again.....

Meanwhile, the Return of Wolverine debacle continues to stretch on, with long delays. I've never seen such a botched attempt to bring a once-popular character back. Sadly, the fact that Marvel couldn't allow a property which was once Marvel's most popular to fade for a few years means that Marvel put out about six replacement characters to fill the void of Wolverine being dead, so no one actually ever missed Wolverine in the first place.

Marvel had a chance to put the X-mythos on the shelves for a few years, back when there was all the controversy over the movie rights. It would have been the perfect time, and then let a creative team with a strong vision for returning the X-Men with a real purpose take over when that right creative team came along.

No, because the X-Men books were still strong sellers (not that strong anymore, but hey, it's comic books in the 2010s, so you can't expect much), Marvel decided they couldn't just stop publishing new X-Men comics. Instead, they decided they would publish really bad X-Men comics to make the fans hate the X-Men, and transition to the Inhumans being just as popular as the X-Men.

Then, sales of the mutant titles started to do really bad, while sales of the Inhumans titles were just as bad, and then Disney ended up with the movie rights to the X-franchise in the end, so Marvel had to scramble to try to undo the fact that they had told readers, "You don't care about these characters anymore!".

Yet, Marvel has absolutely no real direction for these characters. It's just sad.

The X-Men properties (outside of some strong spin-off books over the years) have been in a real dire position almost since Claremont left Uncanny X-Men. The Scott Lobdell 1990s era has some fans, I realize. The Grant Morrison run was pretty strong. Otherwise, X-Men has been a book with struggling creative teams, but overall, strong sales figures.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You can't trust Marvel to not mess everything up though. They actually did retire the Fantastic Four for a few years, and then brought back the comic, to wide-publicity. Still, the comic reads as if Marvel is just publishing a Fantastic Four comic for the sake of publishing a Fantastic Four comic. They didn't bother to find a strong, new creative direction to take the book. They just handed it to Dan Slott and let the mediocrity immediately return to the title.

So, even had Marvel decided to let the X-books lie for a few years, it would probably still be a mess.

Every so often, modern-day Marvel lucks upon a good decision, like allowing Al Ewing to fully realize his vision for a Hulk comic book, so the Hulk comic is actually readable again after I don't even know how many years. After Ewing, it'll probably return to more bad creative decisions and end up in the doldrums for years all over again. That's just the way of modern Marvel. They can put out a few titles worth reading, while most of their titles exist solely for the sake of trademarks and movie advertising.

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War is Hell (one-shot)-Howard Chaykin with another World War II era story. I have to be honest, the story didn't do much for me. It was the quote by Goebbels, which opened the story, which was my favourite part of the story. These same old Nazi conspiracy theories are still kept around.

There was a back-up story which was ok. It was set in contemporary times. It stuck with the title of the comic, which is that "war is truly hell". It was written by a writer I have never heard. I actually enjoyed this one more than the Chaykin lead.

 

Crypt of Shadows (one-shot)-Al Ewing writes a nice pastiche of a horror story that you could easily see reading in one of the old Atlas horror comics.

It's not Ewing's writing at its best, due to his purposely writing in the style of that time, but it was fun.

Oh, the vintage variant cover for this one was great.

 

I think I'd have to give a slight edge to the War is Hell comic over Crypt of Shadows, even though I wasn't even that fond of the Chaykin story.

I don't regret buying these two comics. However, you're not missing anything if you don't read these comics. For the Chaykin or Ewing completest only.

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Oh good, the Age of X-Man event avoids ending up as an appeal to the alt-Right. I was worried when I read that X-Man creates an utopian world for mutants where there is no hate, but it comes at the cost of creating a dystopian world where there is no love. I was half expecting to see some ham-fisted antiquated philosophy about how "love cannot exist without hatred", which in the modern-era following such great lovers as the Nazis, is a concept that obviously has no validity. I was thinking, "Gee, this should be cringe inducing for Marvel".

Nope. It's a typical dystopian sci-fi trope, of a world where reproduction must be regulated and controlled. I guess Marvel couldn't just put a world where "sex is banned".

While I don't have any interest in this cross-over event, the idea of Apocalypse as a hippie wanting to spread love does almost tempt me....

I still think they missed the boat by creating a typical sci-fi dystopian world rather than sticking with the premise of the X-Men mythos.

X-Man creates an utopian world where only mutants exist.....except this isn't Xavier's dream. Xavier's dream was for humans and mutants to co-exist. So, it could be rejected on the grounds that a world without the struggle for equality and justice is a meaningless victory. I think that would work better for the core concepts of the X-Men.

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Marvel may have just found a way to save the X-franchise. Jonathan Hickman is returning to Marvel this Summer, and if the rumour is true, he's taking over on the X-Men.

If anyone can help the X-Men books in the same way as Morrison once did, it's Hickman. If you consider what he did for the Fantastic Four and the Avengers. It seems like a more science fictional oriented take on the X-line, ala Morrison, is exactly what Hickman could bring to the series.

https://comicbook.com/marvel/2019/03/19/marvel-jonathan-hickman-return-x-men/

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