Jump to content
A. Heathen

DC Comics

Recommended Posts

Yeah, but this isn't a pure relaunch of the character, is it? Isn't it still taking place in the established continuity?

The idea of challenging the readers' perception of Hal Jordan, as compared to other Green Lanterns, who were meant to be more creative and imaginative, was done by J.M. DeMatteis and Seth Fisher in the excellent and must-read Green Lantern: Will World.

Going back to those original John Broome Green Lantern stories (which I love), they were written in the typical DC Silver Age style, where characterization was almost totally absent and ideas were the sole focus. Hal Jordan was a very boring character, but the stories Broome was writing were all about Imagination. It was more a product of its time, than Broome really making any comment about Jordan, as a person.

There's room for challenging expectations that readers have of Hal being cut out for a job as an insurance salesman or the Denny O'Neil interpretation, sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You miss my point: there's few things squarer than an old fart trying to sound like a hipster by using slang that doesn't work for him.

:wink2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were talking about Hal Jordan, but point taken: Morrison does like to draw on his own history in his fiction, does he not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/28/2018 at 5:19 AM, Christian said:

Did anyone see the preview pages for Grant Morrison's Green Lantern that have been posted? I don't want to be negative and hold my judgment until I see the final comic, because I can't bear to disparage Morrison yet. ...

I hope the preview pages just lack context, and the mind-expanding ideas start coming fast and furious right after the preview ends. What I saw on the page wasn't even able to really stand up to the less than stellar standards of most current superhero comics.

Yeah, same. Maybe the first few pages weren't the best pages for a preview. But between the writing ("THEN USE MINE, GREEN LANTERN!!!!!1!!1!") and the stiff art, that book's off my list.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I didn't want to mention it, but the artwork didn't look right for Liam Sharpe either. His artwork usually looks a lot better than this. It must be the inker is hurting the quality. Either that, or he was rushing to meet a deadline.

I still don't see how Morrison and Shape could ever go wrong on a comic....

I'll definitely give the first issue a chance....because, could a Morrison book really be as bad as the preview pages make it appear? That would be a shame if DC published the worst couple of pages from the entire issue for their preview, and the book gets "wicked shredded!!!" (see what I did there?*) on the next page.

*Yeah, I'm not even really sure what that means.

Otherwise, if DC published that preview, and I didn't know Morrison was writing the book, I would think, "Another poorly written DC superhero book. Skip!".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heroes in Crisis 1 - not sure what to think of this. It's not poorly written, but I follow so little DC stuff that I am not sure what's really going on. And, the powers that be certainly over-value Harley Quinn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they're promoting her to appease people who like to cosplay at conventions happy, Lou.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She's become DC"s answer to Deadpool. No one is sure why they got so popular, a lot of readers are annoyed by the characters, but yet both companies continue to push both characters very heavily.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope.

And her initial set up that made for some good stories about abusive boyfriends treating women like shit and then expecting them to be grateful to be getting any attention at  all was pretty much exhausted by Paul Dini in the early '90s. Why the character still lingers like a fart in a lift now that the whole point of her has been dumped is puzzling.

[ETA] Maybe there's a metaphor there about how DC sees the comics fans who keep clamouring for more Harley?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, she was a pretty interesting character in her initial appearances under Dini, but the character today bears pretty much zero resemblance to the original interpretation.

I do wonder, since I didn't follow DC as closely as Marvel, how Harley went from "former psychiatric nurse who falls in love with the Joker" to "bad-ass chick hanging out with superteams". It's an evolution that doesn't make any sense for the character.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely. What's interesting about her in those early stories is that the whole manic badass persona comes across as a front and she's obviously a very fragile, needy personality under all the bluster. That doesn't seem to even get mentioned anymore, does it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems to me that the Dini/Animated Series Harley Quinn was replaced by the Suicide Squad/Margo Robbie version a while back.  The Injustice games and comics play into that a lot as well, since she's one of the main characters there.  I don't get her appeal at all, she grates on my nerves whenever she appears (much like Deadpool, in fact).  I flipped through Heroes in Crisis and wasn't too impressed, it was a bloodbath with the barest attempts of resonance other than "look at all these characters we can kill off, guess who's next!".  Easily the least engaging comic I've read from Tom King by a mile.  

Nice artwork, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.newsarama.com/42168-young-justice-wonder-twin-dial-h-for-hero-more-part-of-bendis-led-dc-teen-imprint.html

Bendis is launching and overseeing a new teen character imprint at DC called "Wonder Comics."

The main attraction DC's trying to sell is Young Justice by Bendis, but the title that will probably be most of note to posters here is Mark Russell's Wonder Twins (Stephen Bryne on art duties).

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Green Lantern & Huckleberry Hound Special #1 (by Mark Russell)-Unfortunately, this was the weakest comic by Russell I have read so far. I am of two minds about it. It's not a horrible comic book. It's just not handled very well. For the first time, Russell failed to blend together the absurdity of his subject matter with the seriousness of the topics he is addressing.

This would have worked a lot better had it not been shoehorned in to a superhero comic universe. The first half of the comic was very good, dealing with real-world historical material. The second half of the comic really falls apart.

Huckleberry Hound served no purpose in the comic after the first half. I think he worked well for the first half, and I wouldn't say that he was totally unnecessary to the story, but Russell pretty well just dropped him by the second half of the story. That didn't really work.

Then, the ending, where the teacher wants the student to rebel, and that's the big lesson for the student to learn.....very cliché. If Family Guy mocks it in an episode, it's best not to try to use it for serious effect in literature again.

So, there's one-half of a very good story in here, it just doesn't all hold together. Maybe had Russell stuck closer to writing an homage to the O'Neil/Adams Green Arrow & Green Lantern comics, it could have congealed in to something complete.

As it is, I can't help but, regretfully, mark this comic down as a failure. A very promising failure (due to that first half), but still a failure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sideways Annual #1-Morrison wasn't writing the back-up strip in this comic, after all. It's hard to tell how much of the writing is Morrison's versus how much is Dan DiDio, as not a lot of Morrison's voice comes forth in the comic.

On the plus side, the story uses the Seven Soldiers of Victory and the New 52 version of Superman.

On the negative side, while Morrison's story does incorporate red-ant head Superman, it's the Dark Multiverse counterpart of these really fun Silver Age characters, meaning they are not fun at all. They are very early-90s and angsty. There's probably nothing worse than seeing porcupine lad Jimmy Olsen bemoaning his transformation as a curse. Or, a stupider name for said character than...."Spiner"....Ugh.

Why, oh why, couldn't they allow Morrison just to have fun with these ideas (also big brain Lois Lane), without making them all dark and twisted? That just makes me sad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Green Lantern #1-OK, that was actually really, really good.

It turns out that DC really was stupid enough to pick the worst couple of pages out of the entire comic to publish as a preview. That seems....defeating.

It makes me wonder if DC editorial requested that Morrison write a really stupid sequence in the middle of the comic, just so people would think the comic was going to be bad.

The rest of the issue read fine, then suddenly, right in the middle, it's like Morrison turned the writing over to, oh, I don't know, let's say Dan DiDio, while he took a lunch break. Then, he came back and finished writing the issue.

I'm looking forward to seeing where this series goes.

It makes me want to dig out my Showcase Presents: Green Lantern volumns.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×