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JohnMcMahon

John Constantine, Hellblazer #2

Your marks out of 10 for Hellblazer #2, please...  

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  1. 1. Your marks out of 10 for Hellblazer #2, please...

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JOHN CONSTANTINE: HELLBLAZER #2

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  • written by SIMON SPURRIER
  • art by AARON CAMPBELL
  • cover by JOHN PAUL LEON
  • John’s return to London isn’t going as smoothly as he’d hoped...though it’s already been just as bloody as he could have expected! Enormous angels straight from the mind of William Blake are tearing people to ribbons in Peckham Rye Common, and the gang lord who’s pressed John into service is getting increasingly impatient about John’s inability to deal with them.
  • ON SALE 12.18.19
  • $3.99 US | 32 PAGES
  • FC | DC BLACK LABEL
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It amused me a lot that when I realised what Fielding was referencing and I did a search for "Ghost of a Flea" on Google there were more links for the skit than for the painting...

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Another good 'un for me, supporting cast is building nicely though I don't need a reference to the fact every issue.  Guess the

possessed phone is from The Books Of Magic

but Spurrier did a good job of bringing me up to speed without it feeling clumsy.

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That's some reductionist version of Blake's beliefs, that is.

I hope she's not very far along in her English literature course, or she's going to be failing the term paper.

I think Spurrier's point is the misunderstanding of the character in his reading of Blake, but it may be important that people look up Blake's poem "Little Black Boy" in its entirety in order to understand. It's free to be found online, I'm sure.

It's an abolitionist poem. Blake seems to be making the case that the black boy is closer to God than the white boy due to the suffering face by the black man through slavery (allegorically equating it with Jesus' suffering).

He makes the point that the black man's skin is sunburnt from being out in the Sun, equating the Sun with the True God, therefore, the black man is equated as being closer to God than the white man. Blake seems to be saying that the white man isn't as close to God due to his racism.

He also makes the point that all of our souls are the same, regardless of skin colour, and will be the same when we return to the One, True God upon death.

Yeah, it's still keeping my interest, but we're in that doldrums middle section of multi-part story-arcs. Spurrier's writing style and the fact that he is building up a cast helps this stand out better than a lot of multi-part story-arcs. I'd like to see the book move more towards stand-alone stories or two-parters moving forward, with only multi-part story-arcs for the major plots, much like HB used to be in the good old day (Delano, Ennis, Jenkins).  It looks like this is just a three-chapter story though, so that's not bad.

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F*cking loved that.

Spurrier nailed it. While it feels authentic, he has his own voice, just as Paul Jenkins and Garth Ennis wrote right-feeling Hellblazer in their own voices. He even sold me on the haunted phone. :biggrin: 

At first I thought the model Aaron Campbell is using for Constantine was off — I'm a Sting purist, sorry — but after only 2 issues this distinctive iteration of Constantine has really grown on me. The expressive face, the humour, the way he operates. 

That art though. It's reminiscent of 1980s Richard Piers Rayner, but not stilted.

If this is a new era of Hellblazer, I'm excited for it.

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On 9/16/2019 at 3:30 PM, JohnMcMahon said:

You have broadened my horizons as I wasn't familiar with the original painting - Ade's going to have to fire up the annotation machine again!

You may have a point.

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Spurrier seems to remember this book needs its quiet moments - with panels of characters staring into space and letting things settle instead of that constant and annoying exposition (e.g. the panel after "tree full of fuckin' angels").  This issue was a little talky but the moments of silence felt like they were from another age.  

Loving it.

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On 1/8/2020 at 6:01 PM, dvyoung444 said:

Spurrier seems to remember this book needs its quiet moments - with panels of characters staring into space and letting things settle instead of that constant and annoying exposition (e.g. the panel after "tree full of fuckin' angels").  This issue was a little talky but the moments of silence felt like they were from another age.  

Loving it.

It's definitely nice that he's back to saving the exposition for caption boxes rather than constantly blathering out loud, yep.

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So far I'd call it a note-perfect rendition of Hellblazer as it should be. Nothing strikingly new, but not horribly derivative either, possibly paving the way for something quite special, but I won't bet too much on that yet.

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