Jump to content
JohnMcMahon

The Fantastic Four

Recommended Posts

Well, no see, McMahon is an actor, so he didn't actually scar his face for the role..... :lol:

Kidding!

Actually, in the comic, (I think it was during Byrne's run on the book? I forget.) they decided that Doom's disfigurement would actually be like one scar on his face, but because he's so obssessed with perfection and so vain, it drove him insane to have even that tiny flaw. But, I think, other times in the comic, they're totally ignored this and gone the original route that Doom's face was mangled. Or, maybe there was a story-line where Doom's face started out with one scar, but then it got totally disfigured? Not positive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, in the comic, (I think it was during Byrne's run on the book? I forget.) they decided that Doom's disfigurement would actually be like one scar on his face, but because he's so obssessed with perfection and so vain, it drove him insane to have even that tiny flaw.

 

I remember that but I think something happened to Doom during a fight with the FF in hell that gave him more scars. But I'm not sure of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, during that run it was shown that the initial accident only caused a single scar...but he ended up at a temple somewhere in the far east, trying to expand his mystical knowledge to free his mother's soul. While at this temple, he made the monks forge his first suit of armor. Inexplicably he demanded they put the mask on before it had fully cooled, and it burned into his skin, thusly disfiguring him far worse than before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And this is the egotistical super-genius who claims that Reed's genius is a pale shadow of himself?!

I mean, even a really fucking stupid 10 year old kid knows enough not to eat a pizza as soon as it comes out of the oven!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The monks even warned him about it! And his reponse was something absurd like, "DOOM waits for nothing!" I'd hate to be the delivery boy that has to bring the pizza by his palace...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If someone is interested here

you can find 11 fantastic four clips. seems not really good to me, altough there are SOME good moments.

 

Oh, and here's a new pic from ghostrider, if someone's interested, i hope i don't show anything you know already :)

grlicensing2005.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm with Christian on most of that (although I have no strong feelings one way or the other about the casting of the Four themselves, the reworked origin for Doctor Doom just sounds naff).

 

The Thing looks fucking awful in all the footage I've seen so far, and I can't for the life of me figure out what possessed them to make the film this way. Given two characters, one of whom is made of rocks (a surface texture which can be convincingly and easily rendered in CGI) and the other of whom wears a metal mask (an appearance which, one would imagine, would look wicked as a physical costume), what do they do? That's right - they computer-generate the metal 'skin', and create a shitty rubbery-looking costume for the rock-man. Gah.

 

yes, the thing looks awful. really really awful. the whole film seems weak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh look ! It´s fantastic! Did I say fantastic? I meant full nasty! One of the superincrediblecoollookinpimpedbyspacecrew looks like my diner from yesterday today morning!Fantastic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh look ! It´s fantastic! Did I say fantastic? I meant full nasty! One of the superincrediblecoollookinpimpedbyspacecrew looks like my diner from yesterday today morning!Fantastic!

Can you back this up with photographic evidence? Otherwise I think you're just talking a load of shite!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a brillant thinker you are!Y ou brought it to the point! But why the hell you get so personal? BEhave!Don´t get angry except you look like the thing! :biggrin:

It can only get better...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What a brillant thinker you are!Y ou brought it to the point! But why the hell you get so personal? BEhave!Don´t get angry except you look like the thing! :biggrin:

It can only get better...

You know the Thing, she's you're girlfriend she is :tongue:

 

 

...not before it gets worse...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so far some pretty horrible reviews that I read last night for this film. One review even stated that there's never been such a bad movie since Batman & Robin. I have no hope to see FF any longer, lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, in the comic, (I think it was during Byrne's run on the book? I forget.) they decided that Doom's disfigurement would actually be like one scar on his face, but because he's so obssessed with perfection and so vain, it drove him insane to have even that tiny flaw.

 

That's such a brilliant idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Victor Von Doom will DESTROY YOU PUNY MORTALS LIKE THE ANTS YOU ARE! So says Doom....Victor Von Doom!"

He's just so horribly cast. Every time I hear his voice, all I can think is that Dr. Doom is being played by someone from "Friends".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Victor Von Doom will DESTROY YOU PUNY MORTALS LIKE THE ANTS YOU ARE! So says Doom....Victor Von Doom!"

He's just so horribly cast. Every time I hear his voice, all I can think is that Dr. Doom is being played by someone from "Friends".

 

Dr Doom played by Matthew Perry. "Could I Be any more evilier. You will be destroyed F4.."*falls over doing a bunhc of whacky antics.*

 

Or played by the guy who used to Joey.

 

*Dr. Doom sees Sue Storm* "So..How you doin? 8-) "

 

Dr. Doom basically has the same role he had in charmed. Evil guy obsessed with his looks tries to kill a group of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the best review I've read of the movie so far.

Almost all the reviews I've read say it wasn't bad, but it just wasn't very good.

 

"I thought the Fantastic Four were superheroes who combined to fight evil as a team. Much to my surprise, there are four of them because they spend most of the plot beating the crap out of each other and taking out half of Manhattan in the process. Dr. Doom actually has to take drastic measures like killing every person in like three boroughs of New York and crushing half the Fantastic Four before he can even get their attention in the first place. When they finally decide to fight Dr. Doom, they set themselves apart from other superheroes by killing about 50,000 innocent bystanders in the process, as they throw cars, blow up Staten Island barges and toss him into crowds and buses.

 

Dr. Doom is actually about half as vain and evil as he is on the FX show Nip/Tuck, and it turns out that his mask was a charity gift from a bunch of children, which I thought was sweet. Anyway, I just found it a surprising film because it wasn't bad; it certainly was different in its bloodthirsty themes."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was never really a fan of the FF, so there is no overly compelling reason for me to see a movie about the team.

 

Add the mediocre casting (in my eyes there's not enough physical difference between Victor, Reed and Johnny, and Alba seems a bit too tarty for Sue -- and how anybody could miss casting Richard Dean Anderson as Mr. Fantastic is beyond me, even if he's a bit on the mature side for this movie) and the corny looking previews, this is on my list of superhero movies to skip this year. Plus the reviews aren't wonderful.

 

Both of the following reviews are by reviewers whose taste and opinion I mostly respect and who have at least some clue about comic book movies. I've posted them here rather than forcing everybody to register for access to the websites.

 

 

 

Superheroes less than fantastic

Flatter on screen than newsprint

But 11-year-old boys will approve

 

 

GEOFF PEVERE

MOVIE CRITIC

The Toronto Star

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Fantastic Four

 

Starring Ioan Gruffudd, Jessica Alba, Chris Evans, Michael Chiklis, and Julian McMahon. Directed by Tim Story. 105 minutes. At major theatres. PG

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Because `The So-So Four' would never do for a quartet of weirdly gifted comic-legend superheroes, The Fantastic Four is somewhat misnamed. Fantastic it ain't, but not bad it sort of is.

 

The Kennedy-era comic that ushered in the so-called "Silver Age" of Marvel, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby's Fantastic Four introduced the template of the conflicted wise-guy superhero that would reach its most popular expression in Spider-Man and become the company's most influential innovation.

 

When the scientific research team led by the paternalistic do-gooder Dr. Reed Richards found itself irradiated into superheroic status by a cloud of spooky space stuff, it also found itself prone to such profoundly non-heroic traits as bickering, jealousy, self-doubt and — in the case of the red rock-skinned behemoth called the The Thing — a bad case of the terminal crankies.

 

The inevitable (post Spider- and X-Men) movie version of FF, which has been just serviceably directed by Barbershop's Tim Story and adequately cast with a quartet of action-figure-ready actors — Ioan Gruffudd as the stretchy Mr. Fantastic, Jessica Alba as the pointlessly dishy Invisible Girl, Chris Evans as a dude-ified Human Torch and Michael Chiklis as the misunderstood pile of red rocks — manages to preserve the snappy just-folks tone of Kirby and Lee's graphic collaboration while losing just about everything else.

 

Foremost among the things lost, of course, is Kirby's awesomely energetic art.

 

If ever a comic was made for the particular expressive properties of a dynamic line arranged in panels on a brightly coloured page, Fantastic Four was it.

 

The Torch's arcing fire-flights, Mr. Fantastic's prophylactic flexibility, The Thing's brute force — these are the things for which comics are made (and Kirby made marvellous) but movies make ridiculous, so Four is ultimately a movie about three people in form-fitting blue suits and their rock-skinned unhappy buddy who do things computers make possible with none of the bold-stroke panache that Jack Kirby summoned.

 

The movie gets some of the comic's sense of human amazement at becoming suddenly superpowered, but after the Spider-Man and X-Men movies, even the awkward transformational rituals feel stale. Plus, as Spider-Man demonstrated, their impact on a person's character is only interesting insofar as there's a character to be impacted upon. If anything, this Four's even flatter on screen than newsprint.

 

The Thing, while nicely Brooklynized by Michael Chiklis, is inescapably diminished when offered as a guy in a lumpy red suit, and Julian McMahon's Dr. Von Doom (a hooded, helmet-wearing Darth Vader precursor if there ever was one), also has none of Kirby's heavy-metal menace. He seems slight and small even when in full raging Doomsday mode, and about as frightening as a fan dressed up for a comic convention.

 

But the movie will probably work fine for the 11-year-old boys it's clearly aimed at — who will enjoy Mr. Fantastic's long reach for toilet paper and the Invisible Girl's stripteases to transparency — and 11-year-olds were always the FF's most passionately approving audience anyway. (When you got older, you graduated to the more nuanced Marvel-made intricacies of Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk.)

 

Certainly a striking contrast to the leaden psychodramatic pretensions of Batman Begins and considerably less torturous than Daredevil, Fantastic Four strives to restore comic entertainment to the status of disposable diverting junk Kirby and Lee once delivered it from.

www.thestar.com

 

=======================

=======================

Fantastic Four **½

Fantastical escapist fare

 

By LIAM LACEY

 

Friday, July 8, 2005 Updated at 3:38 AM EDT

 

From Friday's Globe and Mail

Fantastic Four

Directed by Tim Story

Written by Michael France and Mark Frost

Starring Jessica Alba, Ioan Gruffudd, Michael Chiklis, Chris Evans and Julian McMahon

Classification: PG

Rating: **½

 

The advance line on Fantastic Four has not been exceedingly positive. Fans have expressed alarm that the movie, based on the venerable Marvel Comics book (born at the start of the space race in 1961), messes with the story. On a more mundane level, the hottest draw on the marquis is the lissome Jessica Alba (Sin City) and she plays Invisible Girl — so what's the point?

 

For those who read credits, the director is Tim Story, who hit gold with the comedy Barbershop, although his last film, the Queen Latifah-Jimmy Fallon comedy Taxi, raised doubts if he could literally direct traffic. What's he doing running a big action picture? The answer is to refuse to take it seriously, and by doing so, he captures some of the original disreputable fun of comics.

 

In a summer of low movie expectations and worse results, Fantastic Four is a not-so-bad mindless bit of camp escapism that doesn't try to eclipse its dime-store comic book roots.

 

The cast features a trio of similar, square-jawed B-actors with dark wavy hair, who look like they were sketched by the same artist pushing toward deadline. They represent Dr. Reed Richards, a.k.a. Mr. Fantastic (Ioan Gruffudd), a shy scientist nerd who has the not-so-bright idea of flying a spaceship into a cosmic storm, which results in changing the DNA of everyone on board. His financier, and subsequent archrival is the unsubtly named Victor Von Doom (Julian McMahon from TV's Nip/Tuck), and his fellow superhero is the impetuous Human Torch, a.k.a. Johnny Storm (Chris Evans).

 

Rounding out the cast is Susan Storm/Invisible Girl (Alba, wearing her hair in a Kim Novak-style upsweep) and Michael Chiklis as Ben Grimm, aka The Thing, a guy whose skin has been transformed into granite, and whose mood isn't much lighter. Stomping about in a fedora and a trench coat over his boulder-sized shoulders, he looks and growls like Spencer Tracy with a mean hangover.

 

The dialogue is mostly a series of wisecracks between the choppy action sequences; the special effects are retro and cheesy, and none of this has a shred of the mythic trappings that have adhered to superhero movies since Superman. Although fans of the 44-year-old comic book by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby may be disappointed (especially with the innovations to Doom's character), there's a lot of Lee's writing style here.

 

The original comic, full of space race and Cold War topical references, included one of Lee's major innovations. The Fantastic Four broke ground by having no secret identities (instead, they maintained both their real names and their superhero titles simultaneously) and, like most Lee heroes, they had lives in the real world. Writers Mark Frost (Twin Peaks) and Michael France (from two previous failed comic book movies, The Hulk and Punisher) use those traditions to have fun with the characters, showing the quartet's struggle with their celebrity, petty jealousies and odd skills.

 

Mr. Fantastic's elastic arms reach across the hall to secure a toilet-paper roll. Invisible Girl fades, does a ghostly striptease and eludes a group of autograph seekers. A stop-gap between last Christmas's The Incredibles and the next year's newest X-Men instalment, Fantastic Four has this much going for it: The movie is not nearly as painful as a lot of other celluloid comics that aim high and flop.

www.theglobeandmail.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest spiderlegs

Never even read the comic until they rebooted it last year. I used to watch the cartoon all the time when I was a kid, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic Four made 20 million buck in the US on friday. which, seeing as most analysists predicted a 30 million dollar weekend, is a LOT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw FF. Not a bad movie. It was no Spider-man 2 or Batman Begins, but thats ok. It does have a lighter hearted tone than other comic movies, which I found to be a nice change. As for Doom's origin having closer ties to FF's it works within the context of the movie. Just not too sure about his "powers." Acting was good all around. Especially Julian McMahon. But especially Michael Chicklis who was great as the Ben Grimm/Thing. It was probably the best dead-on comic character protrayal in I don't know how long. Perfect! Although when seeing him as Ben Grimm, I kept expecting him to beat the holy hell out of Victor and put a gun in his mouth, Vic Mackey style.

I am hoping that now the setup is out of the way with this first movie, that the next movie will be Doom free, and have the 4 doing what they do best: explore strange worlds and dimensions, like the Negative Zone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...