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Mark    332
doesn't The Last Battle hint that the only reason they've fetched up in Narnia at their age is because they've died before it started?

 

Nope - but only in the sense that it doesn't hint at that, it states as much outright.

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dogpoet    443

Thanks.

It's a long time since I've read any of those...

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dogpoet    443

I remember a point where the two boys are discussing that they've been catapulted between worlds by a train crash. The elder suggests that they might be dead and threatens the younger not to breathe a word to the girls about it, now that Mark's jogged my memory a bit.

I think there was a lot of stuff early in the book about how they're going to get there, and I think they're looking for the magic rings from the "first" book (not the Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe, the one nobody can ever remember) when they get on the train in the first place...

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dogpoet    443

Yep. The Lucasey retconney one that's supposed to take place before the others, despite not looking like it's got all that much to do with them.

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Mercury727    5

Have read all the available Jack Staff trades now, enjoyed them muchly. The non-linear storytelling reads rather well in trade methinks.

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Christian    735

Arkham Asylum:Madness by Sam Kieth-I picked this up because the store had it heavily discounted (66% off).

It was a huge disappointment, except for the art. The art would be what would sell this book.

Some of the art is beautiful. There's a Killer Croc scene near the beginning that is stunning.

The writing is really sub-par, very disappointing from Kieth. It reads like it's trying far too hard to try to be like Morrison's graphic novel, and ends up failing on every level.

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Christian    735

It mainly focuses on the staff at the asylum, rather than the patients (like Morrison's).

The Joker plays a very large role in it, once again.

Basically, it's sort of a day in the life of a woman who works in one of the worst places on Earth. What type of people would work there? What sorts of difficulties would they have working with those types of patients?

That's the basic plot. Another aspect to the plot is that even though Joker is confined as an in-mate, he keeps finding ways to create havoc with the staff.

There's cameo scenes by other Bat-villains who are having sessions with the doctors.

It tries to play to weirdness and mood, like Morrison's, but it doesn't succeed in achieving the same otherworldly and creepy feel of Morrison's. It would be harder to do that in a story about regular people anyway.

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Rogan    176

Thanks. I liked that mini by Dan Slott, Arkham Asylum : Living Hell. Wasn't trying to be Morrisonian otherworldly weirdness, and had some lovely artwork.

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Christian    735

Yeah, that was a good series. Pretty graphic for a non-"mature readers" DC title.

This wasn't as good as the Slott series.

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Trace    0

Anyone know when Richard Stark's Parker: The Score is to be released?

The last page of The Outfit says that "Parker will return in 2012."

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Christian    735

I read the new graphic novel by Daniel Clowes about a week ago, which is called Mr. Wonderful. I was pretty disappointed by it, honestly. Clowes stories are usually always about alienated outsiders trying to deal with a lonely life, but in this story, there was actually a happy ending! I was shocked! Has Clowes gone soft in his old age? It was the story of a middle-aged divorced man going on his first date since his divorce, a woman he met online, and his feelings of social awkwardness.

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Christian    735

I've been reading through the first two books of the Ultimate JMS Amazing Spider Man Collection, and yeah, I just don't get all the raves that JMS received for his work on Amazing Spider Man.

I'm so glad I chose to read the Jenkins' Spider Man run instead.

The smattering of character moments are really good, but otherwise, you get stories about Spider Man having magical totemic powers (talk about something that doesn't belong in a book like Spider Man!), and story-arcs that last way beyond what they sensibly should, such as four issues given over a story-arc about dead radioactive mob bosses.

A character like Digger is a throw-away filler villain from a 1980s Marvel comics. One that the writer would come up with just to fill the quota for that month. It'd be over in one issue and you'd never hear about the character again. JMS spends four months on something like that.

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dogpoet    443

So it's even worse than his godawful Squadron Supreme revamp stuff, then?

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sethos    5

I read the new graphic novel by Daniel Clowes about a week ago, which is called Mr. Wonderful. I was pretty disappointed by it, honestly. Clowes stories are usually always about alienated outsiders trying to deal with a lonely life, but in this story, there was actually a happy ending! I was shocked! Has Clowes gone soft in his old age? It was the story of a middle-aged divorced man going on his first date since his divorce, a woman he met online, and his feelings of social awkwardness.

 

I actually really enjoyed it, since it wasn't his usual extreme downbeat ending. I liked the "two wounded people hooking up" plot. Shit, Wilson and the upcoming graphic novel version of The Death-Ray are downbeat enough.

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So it's even worse than his godawful Squadron Supreme revamp stuff, then?

What was wrong with the revamp?

Aside from the "creative break" that never finished I enjoyed the first volume.

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Christian    735

So it's even worse than his godawful Squadron Supreme revamp stuff, then?

What was wrong with the revamp?

Aside from the "creative break" that never finished I enjoyed the first volume.

 

I've got to agree with this. I thought his Squadron Supreme was pretty impressive.

I only read the first two Trades, and it might have gone terribly downhill, but I was gripped by what I did read.

 

So, yes, I'd consider his Amazing Spider Man much worse than his Squadron Supreme.

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Fair enough.

Rather than an I-liked-it-you-didn't I'd be interested as to why you didn't.

I throughly enjoyed the first 18 issues of Supreme Power, perhaps a little less guile and brio but it was up there with the Ultimates as a modernised Superhero team.

Franks' art was cracking throughout, was sorely missed on the 5 issue Hyperion follow up, but returned for the short lived Squadron Supreme.

 

What specificaly pissed me off, besides J.Mac lying to my face about the "creative break" :sad:, was that ultimately even though it was a remake of those classic 12 issues, he didn't seem to know where he was going at all.

His engaging The Twelve suffered from the same syndrome, again fizzling out uncompleted.

Additionally I've just finished his Superman Grounded run which started off quite strongly and as with the above appear to disappear with the writers disinterest.

 

I'm a fan of those tight, layered stories that appear upon completion to have been written backwards, this is/was evidently not Straczynki's approach.

 

Next week sees the conclusion of his Wonder Woman Odyssey, I can't say I have high hopes and if it weren't for his enjoyable tales in Brave and the Bold I might not have bothered.

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dogpoet    443

I had an issue with the lack of foresight (and indeed, any point) that you mention as well. I also found the political undercurrents distasteful (if I want a libertarian rant masquerading as a story, I can read Ayn Rand), and several of the characters being even smugger (and more overindulged by their author) than the tenth Doctor at his worst. Bear in mind I didn't much like The Ultimates either.

(The art was definitely good, though.)

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Christian    735

I don't see it as being any more political than the original Squadron Supreme series, and I found the politics to be a bit more developed than the simplistic politics of Gruenwald's story.

I get upset at the trend today to make every comic story "relevant" by putting unnecessary political commentary into the plot. You know, because an escapist story about guys with super-powers fighting each other is just crying out to be made palatable to the reading public by being made "realistic". No room for simple, childish concepts like fun or creativity in this dark and serious world known as "superhero comic books".

At the same time, at the end of the day, that's the type of story this was meant to be, one of those deconstructions of the superhero. In that sense, I found it sticking to the original intent of the creator who wrote the original series*, and there certainly is room for these types of stories in comic books, just not every comic book.

 

*Yes, I realize that the characters were originally created simply as a fun in-joke to be able to write Marvel versus DC stories, but there was always a dystopian element involved, as very early it was revealed that the Squadron's Earth was ruled by Rockefeller and was a corporatist State.

 

I'm not sticking up for JMS as a writer either, as I find him very unprofessional.

"Gee, I don't feel like finishing this maxi-series I started, so I'll just quit and eventually jump to another company and hope everyone forgets that I was ever working on that book...well, unless I decide to get around to finishing that story a few years from now. You never know. Then I hope the company will be sure to market the hell out of me as a big-name creator because I worked on some TV show!"

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