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lyra

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Mark recently lent me Batman: Year one by Frank Miller. Now, I have to say I'm definitely not a Batman fan, but this story was very well-written. I liked the emphasis on making Batman a realistic character, not really a superhero. (Well, as realistic as a cape-wearing superhero can be, anyway...)

Frank Miller is actually very good when he writes about believable characters, with real emotions. He's way worse when he goes over-the-top testosterone-driven. (Sin City being a case in point)

 

I still say they should have given Frank Miller a writing credit for Batman Begins, seeing how much it lifts from Batman Year One...

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I watched a biography of Frank Miller that was on some cable station the other night.

Nothing really interesting. It was only half an hour, so it was quite rushed.

It started talking about his original run on D.D., then moved on to "Batman:Year One" and "DKR", his "Robo Cop" movie, and then covered "Sin City".

It did have lots of interview segments with Miller about his career.

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I still say they should have given Frank Miller a writing credit for Batman Begins, seeing how much it lifts from Batman Year One...

 

He got some money for it, apparently, as a courtesy gesture by DC/Time Warners. So did Denny O'Neill and Jeph Loeb, both of whom had elements from their Batman work used in the film. It was surprisingly decent of them, actually - or at least, good publicity - since, given that the work was produced under work-for-hire contracts, they were under no legal obligation to do so.

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They did the same thing with Delano, Ennis, Moore, Bisette and Totleben for Constantine, too. The money for Delano was especially surprising, given that there are maybe three or four tiny moments in the film that kind of vaguely resemble something from his Hellblazer run.

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I've been making my way through several Hellboy trades as of late and thoroughly enjoying them. Wake the Devil, Chained Coffin and Conqueror Worm have some of the most beautiful artwork Ive ever seen, very easy on the eyes and then of course there's the central character, a compelling figure even if the stories he's featured in dont all rock my socks. Would it be worth my time tracking down some of the BPRD trades, or do they change the tone too much?

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Yeah, but at the same time, they gave him $10 and a coupon for a free Medium Latte at Starbucks.

That's a damn fine cup of coffee :lol:

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Just finished Conqueror Worm from Mignola. Great I loved it! I read it in the english edition. There are translated here on the market but they are printed in b/w, but I like the colours of the orginal american issue.

 

Also read Seed of Destruction. Next one I´ll pick up is"Wake the devil"!

 

RA RA RASPUTIN...It´s a favourite song here from the 70´s!(You know what I mean)

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Just finished reading Pyongyang.

This is just a fantastic book the artwork is top notch and the story is amazing. The comic centers on a animation director who is in north korea for two months overseeing a cartoon. Soon, he finds his animation team slowly disappearing and being replaced by others. The city is presented in all its concrete glory while Kim Jong Il and his father are always watching his every move. I liked it when he gave the book 1984 to his translator who hastily returned it saying he didn't "like science fiction."

1896597890.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

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I'm about halfway through the second Lucifer trade, Children and Monsters. It's quite an excellent read, and Carey is definitely in top form here. I quite like the throwbacks to Sandman, and the covers are simply excellent.

 

I am greatly enjoying this series.

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I recently picked up JLA: American Dreams and am wondering why Superman is all blue and white?

Basically Twilight, Supes powers went haywire for a bit. He became all super charged up with energy due his obsorbing too many sun rays or something and thus became an energy being with electromagnetic type powers. It became so bad that Superman had STARlabs build him a containment suit. Think Capt. Atom, but not radioactive.

It was a sad time. :icon_cry:

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It's just one of a couple of instances of wider-DCU continuity infringing weirdly on Morrison's (fucking ACE) JLA run. Something weird appears to have happened to the Flash at some point, while Wonder Woman spends several issues being dead, during which time she's apparently been replaced by her own mother. None of this ever gets explained within the title, but very little really has much impact on the stories themselves.

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Saga of the Swamp Thing: Volume 1

 

Never ever looked at the title before, got payed, decided I need to buy something random. Best. Choice. Ever.

 

Although I'm sure you all already know that.

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It gets a lot better and little worse before the end of Moore's run. Well worth going through them all, though.

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If you can't wait for more, give me a call and you're welcome to borrow volumes 2-6 any time. You're going to end up buying them all anyway, though, because I reckon they're some of the best comics ever written, and I'm totally confident that you'll agree.

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Im considering getting Crisis on Infinite Earths unless it requires substantial background reading of a whole array of other TPB's first...

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It can be read pretty easily on it's own, but unless you have a specific reason for wanting to read it, I'd say that there are many, many other books which are more worthy of your time. Crisis has a decent enough overall concept, and a few fun scenes, but as a whole, it drags on for far too long, and the writing style has aged very badly.

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Well Ive spent time and money on various other notable comics collected in trade form i.e. Watchmen, Dark Knight Returns etc etc Although unlike their notable reputations, this one catches my attention due to more recent developments however...

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I'm not sure if this has been traded yet, but I recently was able to collect all of 303, by Garth Ennis. I had scans of issues 1-3 for the longest damn time, but had been unable to find 4-6. Anywhere.

 

It's not a very complicated story, but the suspense is very well built up over each issue, and it shifts gears from a straight military story to a much more surreal, allegorical tale seamlessly. Some of its implications are very haunting, and I think they'll be staying with me for awhile.

 

It's probably Garth Ennis' darkest story yet (with the possible exception of Unknown Soldier), and he's on top form here. While his "Punisher" arcs have been much gritter over the past year or so, they're still way too over the top to take too seriously. I'm not surprised that Ennis had to publish this through Avatar; some of the stuff it pulls in the final issues is very shocking, especially considering the current political climate.

 

I only have two minor criticisms: Jacen Burrows' art, while generally very good, is a bit too straightforward for this sort of story. The characters seem a bit too square-jawed, and the colors are a little too bright. Actually, the art gets much better in issues 4-6, but I can't help but wonder how much more effective this sort of story would have been with, say, Killian Plunkett (Unknown Soldier, again) illustrating.

 

The other complaint is that it was too damn short. I think there was a lot of wasted potential in the story's hook. Another six issues--at least--could have been spent on the main character's journey from Afghanistan to America (on foot, no less), and it would have been interesting to see him interact with more people in the states.

 

But all in all, it was top notch. I'd encourage everybody to check it out.

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RE:"Crisis"

It should be about #150 on your list of Must Read TPBs/G.N.s.

I think it's a really fun superhero story, but unless you have a ton of knowledge of the DCU and a real love for the DC characters, there's not much point in reading it, as it'll be a bunch of pointless characters involved in a pointless battle for something you won't even care about.

It can be read completely on its own, but it features about every DC character up to 1985, and isn't much of a classic story.

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