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lyra

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I picked up the MADMAN'S DRum by Lynd Ward. This amazing precursor to the graphic novel was last published in 1931 and has just been kindly released by dover books for just 8 dollars as opposed to the regular 100 dollars it goes for on E-Bay.

I think most casual Hellblazer readers would quite enjoy the heavy occult undertones of the Madmans drum. The story centers around a slave trader who kills a african native and takes his magically potent drum. The drum slowly destroys his entire family driving them mad. My personal favorite is when the son turns his back on god and drops his crucifix down the stairs shortly later his mother trips on the cross and dies.

my avatar is a collage of some of the images from the graphic novel.

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lyra, words can not convey how appreciative I am of your post. I dutifully trotted over to Amazon to order Mad Man's Drum, because one look at the cover convinced me I need to own it. That alone would make my happy, but it wouldn't be enough to make me cry like a baby.

 

When I was a child, one of THE seminal events of my childhood was reading a wordless illustrated book about a child and a flying horse. I loved that book. No, more than that - I treasured it. I couldn't even explain why, exactly. I felt this weird and powerful connection to it, and carried it around with me. I had to have been a little thing at the time - old enough that I was reading regular prose books, but not so old that carrying around an illustrated one felt odd, even though it felt a little strange - and somehow more magical - that it contained no words at all. As so often happens to childhood totems, it disappeared some time along my path to adulthood.

 

Over the years I've tried everyone, and every place, I could think of to identify it. Even a close friend who possesses a startling knowledge of children's books featuring animals, hadn't the foggiest clue. Absolutely no dice. No one I contacted had even heard of such a thing, let alone had the first clue about where to start looking.

 

Lo and behold, under "Customers Who Bought This Book" there it was - "The Silver Pony: A Story in Pictures", by the same author. That's the book. I can feel it in my bones, just from looking at the cover image. I was even able to buy a used copy of the old hardcover, just like I had when I was a child. Shipped, it's under $6.

 

A thousand thanks.

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Wow, that is just amazing. What are the chances. My favorite children's book without words is the Red Balloon. If you like the Madman's drum you should pick up God's man.

His first book was God's man which deals with a faustian deal an artist makes for fame and fortune. The book did so well he made a follow up the madman's drum. His style began to evolve from the german expressionism to a more traditional style which he used for several award winning childrens books. Toward the end of his life he was diagnosed with alzheimer's and created some startling detailed carvings. What is unique about him is all of his carving are against the grain.

I really had been unable to find out much about Lynd Ward but i bought a few issues of Comic Journal and they had a few articles on him. LAst week, I borrowed several printmaking book from my university library on printmaking. One of the books had a seven page section of how Lynd ward composed and printed his work it was just amazing that something like that exisited.

I'd imagine Amazon UK would carry the book.

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"In the Shadow of No Towers"-God, this is a HUGE book. I have no idea where I'm going to put it!

I'm undecided about this book. It's a great read, but at the same time, I don't think I can recommend it to anyone, as it's a $20 book (which is quite flimsy, I felt it might fall apart at any moment while I read it) that takes the same amount of time to read as a monthly comic book.

I got it for half off, so I'm not very miffed.

If you want a good story about one man's reaction to Sept. 11th, 2001 in New York, in a unique format, that looks very classy, then you should buy this book. Otherwise, I'd highly suggest renting it.

 

There is a neat little essay in back discussing some of Spiegelman's favourite comic strips while growing up. It meant something to me, because my grandfather has talked about reading some of the strips discussed.

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Anyone plan on picking up the Walking Dead Omnibus collecting the first 24 issues? I already own all of them but it is hard to pass up on such a nice collected edition. It isn't badly priced for 63 dollars on Amazon retails for 100 dollars.

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Bought the Showcase presents Jonah Hex, at £9 for 526 pages, it was a bargain, and I was surprised by the grittyness of the stories and mature attitude.

 

Its shame its black and white and the quality of paper etc is low, BUT its a bargain and a great read.

 

Also picked up Vimanarama, by Grant Morrison and Phillip bond, how I like Bonds artwork. This sia ctually a xmas present for my non comic reading brother, who heard about this comic through mainstream media.

 

Jamesb

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Last week i bought "I am Legend" by Richard matheson adapted by Stephen Niles and Elman brown

Bloody brilliant it was gripping story ina totally realistic setting. Where the main character is the last man alive in a world over run by Vampires. Surviving simply because that is all he knows. I really enjoyed this and found myself empathising with the character at all points in the story.

 

 

Also bought "Ocean" by Warren Ellis

It was good and almost a total return to form from the glory days but still i found it a little short and Unfulfilling. Like a drunken orgasm, promises so much but then for no reason fails to deliver. Don't get me wrong spot on art, great dialogue good plotline. Just not enough for me. I still thing Ellis suffers from having done his greatest work (Transmetropolitan) too early in his career.

 

Thats my week anyway.

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Just picked up The Losers, Close Quarters. Diggle proving yet again that Hundred Bullets doesn't have a monopoly on title puns. And Jock gets to play with some lovely settings... And a nice rip on Sealand too. One big FUCK NO moment and a lot of smooth action. A nice tri-annual treat for me these books.

 

But the guy who chose the text for the front cover needs to be shot. Jocks art aint "craggy" it's smooooooooooooth.

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Finished "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" (by:Kim Deitch) last night. Really good read. It was haunting and funny at the same time. The ending just kind of came and went though, that's the only complaint.

It's about Waldo the Talking Cat, a cartoon cat from the 1930s who was alive and could be seen by the creators who worked on his cartoon. They described him as an "evil cat". After they smoked from a certain pipe, they'd be able to see into Waldo's cartoon world, which gave them inspiration for their cartoons.

Bad things happen to those who mess with Waldo's cartoon, but maybe Waldo isn't really evil after all.....

The story follows the people who were involved in the creation of Waldo's cartoons.

It also talks about the way Disney changed the face and creativity of those early cartoons.

 

Final Grade: A

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Guest spiderlegs

I now own all the Wazza episodes of STORMWATCH. I picked up the one that introduced Shen, Hawsmoore, and Jetnny Spaerks today, and the next trade, too.

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Just got The Best of the Spirit. WOW. You can do no wrong with this trade. For those of us who can not afford to buy the archive editions of The Spirit, this trade is a great alternative. It is hard to choose which Spirit stories to include, but I think DC did a good job. Oh and there is an intro by some guy named Gaiman. It is amazing that I was reading stories that are about 60 years old and they still hold today.

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IN another thread I had posted that I finally got my missing Sandman volumes.... and Mark or James (one of them, or both of them, I am not quite sure) said that these 2 volumes, 2 and 7 were the best in the lot - titles are ----- Season of Mists (Vol 2) and Brief Lives (Vol 7)... and I agree. Reads like it. But I'll re-read the entire Sandman set this Holiday season and see if I still think so after that....

 

I am beginning to like Destruction quite as much as I like Dream. Except Dream wears Black and Blue - 2 colors I like on a man.

Well Destruction aint built bad though. Built like a lumberjack, affects clothes of same, too.... but i like the way he thinks (well, so it's really Gaiman, but let's not quibble)

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"Seasons of Mist" is actually vol. 4, and is quite easily the best of the "Sandman" series.

 

"Brief Lives" was good, but I enjoy the "Kindly Ones" a lot more.

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Boulevard of Broken Dreams is fantastic. The artwork is just jawdropping.

 

I purchased two Sandman bookends on e-bay for my Vertigo graphic novel collection. They are so gorgious. I already have one set but for 65 dollars i couldn't pass them up. They retailed for 350 dollars when they came out and were sold out.

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I'm thinking of picking up these following graphic novels

PErsepolis and its sequel. I believe it is about an IRanian girl growing up in Iran and her brief stay in Austria.

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Epileptic. This graphic novel deals with the artists epileptic brother.

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Pretty well everyone on here has read "Persepolis" and we all love it. Her parents are Socialists and she grows up in Iran at the tail end of the Shah's reign and during the Iranian revolution.

I haven't read the two follow up books (she also released a third book in the series, which is sort of an addendum). The first book doesn't take her into Austria though, so that must be the second one.

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Of yes, Christian. Volumes 4 and 7. The Sandman.

Whatever was I thinking of...

impending crisis, i expect...

oh well, better to get it over with already.

 

I didnt like the Kindly Ones as much as Brief Lives...

at any rate, this Christmas, I shall hopefully be occupied with lots of reading, even if some of them are re-reads.

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I will pick them up them. Thanks. I think the second one is when she visits Austria.

 

lyra, after seeing your fantastic grimoire covers I can safely say that you of all the people on this board need to purchase Epileptic.

 

As for Persepolis, the first volume "The Story of a Childhood" is amazing. The second one, "The Story of a Return", well.... a surly confused teenager ex-pat doesn't make nearly as interesting a protagonist as a little girl growing up during the Cultural Revolution. Just remember, these books are fiction, not non-fiction as many reviewers seem to think, although supposedly many of the events are drawn from the author's life.

 

The third book by Satrapi (not released under the Persepolis banner, IIRC), Embrodieries, contains some little interesting tidbits about members of the author's family and insights into Iranian culture, but at the same time, I found it to be a lightweight little piffle of a book. I'm glad I read it, but even more glad I was able to borrow it from the library rather than having to pay for it.

 

On lyra's recommendation, Ibought Mad Man's Drum, which I'll wax rhapsodic about some time when I have the time and strength. Until then, I'll restrict myself to saying that I greatly enjoyed it, both as art and as an important work from a very early stage in the medium.

 

Oh, and my copy of The Silver Pony can scarcely be ripped from my hand. I can scarcely believe how vividly I remember images in the book I haven't seen for close to thirty years.... and my feeling as a child, that even though this was a book without words it was still an adult's book? I was a smart kid. Wonder what happened subsequently? :biggrin:

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At Borders today, I read Y: The Last Man-Girl on Girl..it wasn't as good as the others, but I liked it.

 

Also, I started reading Alex Robinson's Box Office poison.

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Of yes, Christian.  Volumes 4 and 7.  The Sandman.

Whatever was I thinking of...

impending crisis, i expect...

oh well, better to get it over with already.

 

I didnt like the Kindly Ones as much as Brief Lives...

at any rate, this Christmas, I shall  hopefully be occupied with lots of reading, even if some of them are re-reads.

The Game is You is by far my least favorite Sandman storyline. The Kindly ones was a bit longer than it needed to be.

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