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Nicolas Cage is Jor-El?

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The newest trend in baby names seems to be giving your newborn the name of a city, usually where it was conceived. There's Bek and Posh's kid, Brooklyn and I've also heard of kids named Cairo and supposedly Brittney Spears considered named her kid London. Some cities work well as names such as Paris, Sydney, and even Boston though I've always dug the name Quito for a kid.

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There's a beautiful baby contest in the local paper and the two stupidest names are Rio Xander Crisp and Tuscany Pidgeon-Davies.

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While I agree John is a nice name, John, I also remember the history lessons drummed in my head in high school. Prince John you know... King Richard and the whole Crusades bit.

 

Not that it matters anytime soon.

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While I agree John is a nice name, John, I also remember the history lessons drummed in my head in high school. Prince John you know... King Richard and the whole Crusades bit.

 

Not that it matters anytime soon.

 

 

High school? Pshaw. That's what movies and cartoons are for -- teaching history to kids who haven't hit the double digits yet.

 

Come now, lets all sing together:

 

Oh the world will sing of an English King

A thousand years from now

And not because he passed some laws

Or had that lofty brow

 

While bonny good King Richard leads

The great crusade he's on

We'll all have to slave away

For that good-for-nothin' John

 

Incredible as he is inept

Whenever the history books are kept

They'll call him the phony king of England

A pox on the phony king of England!

 

He sits alone on a giant throne

Pretendin' he's the king

A little tyke who's rather like

A puppet on a string

And he throws an angry tantrum

if he cannot have his way

 

And then he calls for Mum while he's suckin' his thumb

You see, he doesn't want to play

 

Too late to be known as John the First

He's sure to be known as John the worst

A pox on that phony king of England!

 

While he taxes us to pieces

And he robs us of our bread

King Richard's crown keeps slippin' down

Around that pointed head

 

Ah! But while there is a merry man

in Robin's wily pack

We'll find a way to make him pay

And steal our money back

 

The minute before he knows we're there

Ol' Rob'll snatch his underwear

 

The breezy and uneasy king of England

The snivellin' grovellin'

Measly weasely

Blabberin' jabberin'

Gibberin' jabberin'

Blunderin'

Wheelin' dealin'

Prince John, that phony king of England

Yeah!

 

 

Yes I'll admit that I cut and pasted that in, but that's just because I can't be arsed to type it all out. I still know the lyrics by heart. Actually I think I still know pretty much the whole movie by heart, as sad as that is.

 

Of course I saw the Errol Flynn version before I saw the Disney version, but the Disney one has better songs.

 

Now to get this back on track, does anybody care to start a baby naming pool? Gwenyth is pregnant again. Care to guess what she'll pick to top "Apple"?

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Jillette Names Daughter Moxie CrimeFighter

Jun 4, 10:57 AM EST

 

Comedian/magician Penn Jillette's latest stunt did not involve his usual sidekick, Teller: He became the father of a baby girl.

 

Jillette, 50, and his wife Emily, 39, welcomed Moxie CrimeFighter Jillette on Friday, according to publicist Glenn Schwartz. It was the first child for the couple, who married last year.

 

"We chose her middle name because when she's pulled over for speeding she can say, `But officer, we're on the same side,'" Jillette explained. "`My middle name is CrimeFighter.'"

 

The typically mute Teller had no comment on the new arrival.

 

Penn & Teller currently star in their own series on Showtime, and headline nightly in Las Vegas at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino.

Jillette Names Daughter Moxie CrimeFighter

Jun 4, 10:57 AM EST

 

Comedian/magician Penn Jillette's latest stunt did not involve his usual sidekick, Teller: He became the father of a baby girl.

 

Jillette, 50, and his wife Emily, 39, welcomed Moxie CrimeFighter Jillette on Friday, according to publicist Glenn Schwartz. It was the first child for the couple, who married last year.

 

"We chose her middle name because when she's pulled over for speeding she can say, `But officer, we're on the same side,'" Jillette explained. "`My middle name is CrimeFighter.'"

 

The typically mute Teller had no comment on the new arrival.

 

Penn & Teller currently star in their own series on Showtime, and headline nightly in Las Vegas at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino.

 

 

Actually I heard an interview with Penn and the reasoning he gave for the middle name was that his wife didn't have a middle name and thought that middle names were unnecessary. He said if that was the case, he could give her whatever middle name he wanted, and apparently CrimeFigher was it. He also did the speeding pull-over joke.

 

BTW does anybody else recall the episode of Miami Vice that guest starred a very chatty and verbal Teller? ;)

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Yes I'll admit that I cut and pasted that in, but that's just because I can't be arsed to type it all out.  I still know the lyrics by heart. Actually I think I still know pretty much the whole movie by heart, as sad as that is.

 

Oh no, that is not sad. Brilliant movie!

 

Now to get this back on track, does anybody care to start a baby naming pool? Gwenyth is pregnant again. Care to guess what she'll pick to top "Apple"?

 

But I wanted to name my kid Banana!

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...never mind the fact that Richard lionheart was an utter bastard...

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and that he could hardly speak English and preferred French and that his brother John was by all accounts a far better King.

 

A friend of a friend called his daughter Gwen Stacy which is both Marvelous and normal in the scheme of things. :D

 

and of course Kevin Smith named his daughter Harley Quinn which I have to say that I'm very tempted to name my daughter also.

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@Keeyah,

 

Why am I not surprised you're a fan? :D Let's see it has archers and Robins and characters wearing short pants. It sounds like it hits a lot of your favourite things. :)

 

@Red and Inca,

 

I never said cartoons taught complete history or even "good" history. ;) Actually even deciding what is good history is a complex lesson in itself. Most of what we consider history is viewed through a subjective lens. A social historian will have a different slant on a topic than say a post modernist/deconstructivist historian. A military historian focuses on different aspects of history and interprets facts differently than a feminist historian does, even if they are writing about the same topic or time period. Anybody who writes a historical thesis or a biography or any other historical review is required to have a point of view, and they are expected to argue their case accordingly.

 

Actually even "facts" aren't always true. Numbers can be fudged and dates can be suspect, or lost in time. Some resources are only comfortable saying, for example, that Xenophon was born sometime during the Peloponnesian War. Others are willing to say, without doubt that he was born in 430 B.C.

 

Not to turn this into an argument about education and child rearing, but personally I think it is good for kids to be exposed, as early as possible, to as much as possible. Let them hear the names King Richard, and Einstein and Picasso, even if the context is simplified and dressed up a bit for their entertainment. Once exposed to a concept or an idea, they are more likely take an interest the next time they hear those names.

 

(Disclaimer. No I don't have kids. Yes I realize that is probably an idealized, romantic approach, and no normally I don't believe in romantic notions. I'll stand by this one however, since I haven't seen proof that locking them in the dark and not exposing them to anything works better. Of course there are a few little buggers that I've run into (actually usually they run into me in the supermarket or the mall) who I think might be improved by locking them in the dark and not letting them out until they learn how to behave. ;) )

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Not to turn this into an argument about education and child rearing, but personally I think it is good for kids to be exposed, as early as possible, to as much as possible. Let them hear the names King Richard, and Einstein and Picasso, even if the context is simplified and dressed up a bit for their entertainment. Once exposed to a concept or an idea, they are more likely take an interest the next time they hear those names. 

 

Absolutley. Kids will either live up to or down to expectations. I know which I prefer.

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My point was that the Robin Hood story about Richard and John and everything is nothing but a myth, it isn't history at all. I think the main reason Richard was elevated in myhts and history was two facts:

1) He stayed out of the country a lot, which made him less responsible for all the foul things other kings routinely did to the peasants of the land.

2) He went on a crusade, which earned him major brownie points with the church.

On that crusade, he was known by the arabs as one of the absolute worst bastards among the crusaders, and that's saying something. I heartily recommend Amin Maalouf's book Crusades through arab eyes for more info on this score. It's a really fascinating read.[/history geek]

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1) He stayed out of the country a lot, which made him less responsible for all the foul things other kings routinely did to the peasants of the land.

 

Be fair - "stayed" makes it sound voluntary. He was actually captured (twice, I believe), and held hostage, the paying-off of which cost the country a not-inconsiderable fortune.

 

Worst. Hero King. Ever.

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Granted. But he ALSO stayed away voluntarily. And yes, he wasn't much of a hero. But then again, the romantic appeal of most kings fade once you study them historically. Most of them were utter bastards.

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I'm not disagreeing with you Red that most of the "Richard the Lionheart" myth is just good PR. The trick is to take that PR and move it forward into history and into a teaching opportunity without the spin.

 

"Daddy was King Richard real?"

"Yes. He was a king."

 

"Did he go on crusade?"

"Yes he did."

 

"What's a crusade?"

"It's when one country goes to war against another country because they disagree about religion."

 

And so on.

 

Even if the slant is wrong and the details are at best fuzzy, the moral is the same. Bad things happen because a king ignored his main job -- his duty to his people and his country -- because he got distracted by needless foreign entanglement. I don't think that's a bad lesson for a five-year-old kid to learn. Pay attention to what you are supposed to do, and ignore the things that really don't concern you. Actually it's not a bad lesson for most world leaders to learn, even today. ;)

 

Besides I'd be thrilled for a five-year-old to be spouting words like pox and crusade and tantrum. It's got to be better than "choo-choo" for their learning development. ;)

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Granted. But he ALSO stayed away voluntarily. And yes, he wasn't much of a hero. But then again, the romantic appeal of most kings fade once you study them historically. Most of them were utter bastards.

 

 

You posted this while I was typing my last response. This is a brilliant post. Of course you get to see the warts of the people you study, but if there is no desire to study them in the first place, no spark, then you never get to that more enlightened state. If a few romantic myths light the fire of curiosity and thought, then the myths have served their purpose. :)

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Right. Sparking interest is a good thing.

Particularly things like this.

 

Personally, I love myths. As for exploring further, sometimes I do, and sometimes I dont. Depends on the myth, and several other reasons.

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For a REAL hero-king, check out the story of Saladin. You know, the guy who whooped the crusaders' collective asses.

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