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Hellblazer: All His Engines OGN

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Imagine having Bermejo and Jock as alternating fill-in artists for Manco? sweeeeeeeeeeeet!

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"Nor aught availed him now to have built in heaven high towers; nor did he scrape by all his engines, but was headlong sent with his industrious crew to build in hell. "

 

John Milton  PARADISE LOST

 

 

Interesting to note that some quotes have "scrape" and others have "scape" as in escape.

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I've always encountered it as 'scape' - I'll check my glossed edition asap to see if there's anything there.

 

Tim B - Paradise Lost is eminently worth reading, but to 'get' the bits which always get referenced, you only really need to get through the first 4 books of it. After that, Lucifer takes a back seat and the poem does become considerably less interesting. Milton, as a Christian, became well aware of the fact that he'd made the Adversary far and away the most compelling character in the work, and clearly felt a need to counter this. It wasn't entirely successful, although the later books are far from without merit. Paradise Regained is worth avoiding, though, unless you're seriously bitten by the bug. Check out a few of Milton's shorter poems instead - Lycidas in particular is highly recommended.

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I know, Mark! Fucking Protestant ethics ruined what could've been the masterpiece of literature! As it is, the book pretty much falls apart and becomes dry after Milton figured out that he made Lucifer a "tragic hero" type character, and sets about attempting to make Lucifer seem "evil". Real shame, as I love "Paradise Lost", and feel that the original presentation of Lucifer is the ultimate picture of the "Adversary" as he stands in modern culture.

Wasn't it Joyce who said something to the affect of, "Too bad John Milton figured out what he was accomplishing before he finished 'Paradise Lost'. Otherwise, we'd have a true masterpiece." Something like that....

 

NOTE:It might not've been Joyce. I'm horrid at figuring out who said quotes....

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the original presentation of Lucifer is the ultimate picture of the "Adversary" as he stands in modern culture.

 

True, but to be fair, that's mainly because everyone and his dog has ripped it off shamelessly...(Mr. Gaiman, I'm looking at you here...)

 

I vaguely recognize the quote, but can't remember who said it. It sounds plausibly reminiscent of Joyce in sentiment, so you could be right...I'll see if I can look it up, but it's tricky without my books here in London.

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Yeah, but I've always enjoyed Lucifer as a "tragic figure" vs. the incarnation of EVIL. Anytime I use Lucifer in my writing, he is always an anti-hero type figure. I've always thought of Lucifer as a personification of the "rebel".

So, yeah, most modern writers have nicked Milton's original idea; but that's the only Lucifer I see worth working with anymore.

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Oh, I don't disagree there. I always preferred the smart, urbane rebel Lucifer to Ennis' pretty-boring-when-you-get-right-down-to-it 'Eeeevil' First of the Fallen, who is much more representative of the other school of devil-representation. He's just not as interesting a character played that way.

 

Most of my favourite devil portrayals slot neatly into the Miltonic school, too, most notably the one in The Master And Margarita (highly recommended to anyone who enjoys the use of the Devil in popular fiction).

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Most of my favourite devil portrayals slot neatly into the Miltonic school, too, most notably the one in The Master And Margarita (highly recommended to anyone who enjoys the use of the Devil in popular fiction).

 

 

That is a TRULY great book... (the movie based on it was done by Serbs, of all people!!!)

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Round here we get this free rag called Comic Shop News, it's a great little read full of reviews and interviews and such. Back cover this week is an add for the 'All His Engines' OGN (along with shameless obligatory movie tie in 'read that which inspeired the motion picture' bollocks).

 

So, I saw talk of this in the movie thread, but I figured this to be a better place for it.

 

You in or out?

 

I'm in.

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Our new friends at Titan should be furnishing me with copies to give of All His Engines to give away, in the process of sorting out details at the moment.

 

You can all rest easy though, they'll be giving me a review copy for myself.

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Right, I'll be entering that compo for sure.

 

Make sure you get some for the Keanu fans, too! Keep preaching the word of Hellblazer.

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Damn! This is one of the best Hellblazer stories I think I've ever read.

 

Leo Manco draws some mean beasties.

 

Not very continuity heavy so people can jump right in on this with no problems. Any Keanu fans that want to read a Hellblazer tale to get in step with the flick will want to pick this up. I even thought about posting about it in the movie thread.

 

Well worth the money (I paid less than $20).

 

What are you waiting for? Go get it!

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It's nice to have DC give some attention to Hellblazer. All His Engines is basically the movie version with the real Constantine we would have gotten in a perfect world. It's a good stand alone story and despite what Carey has previously said, I don't see any continunity problems except that Constantine is now a good brawler. The story is heavy on the magic and the only problem I have is that the conclusion seemed a bit sudden and too much of a case of Carey making up his own rules. Still it's cool for me to have Constantine hanging out in my part of the world and as far as I can tell it looks like the real Los Angeles. The friendship between John and Chas has never seemed stronger. I recommend it highly and the book costs about as much as a tank of gas so don't make excuses that it's too expensive.

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yeah, I just finished reading it and it's lovely!

 

the art is a lot stronger than Manco's work on the regular title, I thought. sometimes his faces get very much like Bradstreet's covers. colouring is also better, but that might be down to the better paperstock used here. Anyway, it's a great story, with some very nice character stuff on Chas. really cool stuff.

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