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JohnMcMahon

Hellblazer #216

Your marks out of 10 for #216  

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  1. 1. Your marks out of 10 for #216

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No, Jenkins was one of the non-English creators I immediately remembered. I'd forgotten, however, about Morrison, and about the two single issues produced by John Smith and Dick Foreman, both of whom I believe are English. The post you quoted was the one I originally made - the one you actually see above your post is the corrected version.

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No, Jenkins was one of the non-English creators I immediately remembered. I'd forgotten, however, about Morrison, and about the two single issues produced by John Smith and Dick Foreman, both of whom I believe are English. The post you quoted was the one I originally made - the one you actually see above your post is the corrected version.

 

 

Ah. So I am pwned. I know nothing. :icon_cry:

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No, Jenkins was one of the non-English creators I immediately remembered. I'd forgotten, however, about Morrison, and about the two single issues produced by John Smith and Dick Foreman, both of whom I believe are English. The post you quoted was the one I originally made - the one you actually see above your post is the corrected version.

 

 

Ah. So I am pwned. I know nothing. :icon_cry:

 

 

Then again, for all I know, Wales is a city in Iraq.....I'm shit with geography...

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If she'd just said "British", instead of English, she'd have been more or less correct (Campbell's Australian, but he only wrote 4 relatively obscure issues of the series, so forgetting about him and Macan would be easily forgivable). It's a pretty common mistake, but still one worth correcting. Wales is not in England, but they're both in Britain, as is Northern Ireland.

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If she'd just said "British", instead of English, she'd have been more or less correct (Campbell's Australian, but he only wrote 4 relatively obscure issues of the series, so forgetting about him and Macan would be easily forgivable). It's a pretty common mistake, but still one worth correcting. Wales is not in England, but they're both in Britain, as is Northern Ireland.

 

Ah ha! So my confusion was in the terminology and not in the actual geography! I feel better now!

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If she'd just said "British", instead of English, she'd have been more or less correct (Campbell's Australian, but he only wrote 4 relatively obscure issues of the series, so forgetting about him and Macan would be easily forgivable). It's a pretty common mistake, but still one worth correcting. Wales is not in England, but they're both in Britain, as is Northern Ireland.

 

Ah ha! So my confusion was in the terminology and not in the actual geography! I feel better now!

 

 

That would mean...and I'm being serious here, making sure I understand because it's not taught like this in schools...England is a country in Great Britain...or is it a country in the United Kingdom....damn, I'm confused again!

 

In high school (grades 10-12) we were taught England=GB=UK.

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In high school (grades 10-12) we were taught England=GB=UK.

 

Yes, but that's because the American edu-ma-cation system fucking stinks when it comes to teaching about anything concerned with the world outside of America.

 

It's really very simple. Listen...

 

The British Isles are a geographical location, encompassing two large islands (plus a load of tiny ones, like the Hebrides, Anglesey, and the Isle of Man) - Ireland and Great Britain.

 

Great Britain is a large island, on which are situated three distinct (but united) countries - England, Scotland, and Wales.

 

Ireland is a smaller island, on which are situated two distinct, non-united countries - Northern Ireland, and the Republic Of Ireland (or Eire).

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (the United Kingdom, or UK for short) is one large country made up of a union between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

 

The problem most non-British people have in understanding all of this is that while, historically and culturally, Scotland, England, Wales (the status of Northern Ireland's slightly more complicated, so just forget about that for now) are separate countries, and are viewed as such on a local scale, in terms of international politics, they're just parts of a single larger country, namely the United Kingdom (which, just to really confuse things, is often referred to simply as Britain). The British Government, which is in charge of the whole of the UK (although Scotland and Wales both now have their own Assemblies, or Parliaments, which determine a lot of local policies - Scotland even has its own legal system, which differs considerably from the one for England and Wales), is located in England. This leads to confusion, not helped by the fact that lots of English people tend to just refer to England when they actually mean the UK.

 

 

I think that's just about everything you really need to know to understand it. See? Simple as you like.

 

;)

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In high school (grades 10-12) we were taught England=GB=UK.

 

Yes, but that's because the American edu-ma-cation system fucking stinks when it comes to teaching about anything concerned with the world outside of America.

 

It's really very simple. Listen...

 

The British Isles are a geographical location, encompassing two large islands (plus a load of tiny ones, like the Hebrides, Anglesey, and the Isle of Man) - Ireland and Great Britain.

 

Great Britain is a large island, on which are situated three distinct (but united) countries - England, Scotland, and Wales.

 

Ireland is a smaller island, on which are situated two distinct, non-united countries - Northern Ireland, and the Republic Of Ireland (or Eire).

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (the United Kingdom, or UK for short) is one large country made up of a union between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

 

The problem most non-British people have in understanding all of this is that while, historically and culturally, Scotland, England, Wales (the status of Northern Ireland's slightly more complicated, so just forget about that for now) are separate countries, and are viewed as such on a local scale, in terms of international politics, they're just parts of a single larger country, namely the United Kingdom (which, just to really confuse things, is often referred to simply as Britain). The British Government, which is in charge of the whole of the UK (although Scotland and Wales both now have their own Assemblies, or Parliaments, which determine a lot of local policies - Scotland even has its own legal system, which differs considerably from the one for England and Wales), is located in England. This leads to confusion, not helped by the fact that lots of English people tend to just refer to England when they actually mean the UK.

 

 

I think that's just about everything you really need to know to understand it. See? Simple as you like.

 

;)

 

 

So....Great Britain is a geographic term, while United Kingdom is a political union.

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'It's a pretty common mistake, but still one worth correcting. Wales is not in England, but they're both in Britain, as is Northern Ireland.'

 

I do not believe that Northern Ireland is part of Britain.

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the offical term, and as you can see it seperates Northern Ireland.

 

This is a historical thing, as Great Britain is much older than when Ireland (all of it) became part of the Union.

 

People in Northern Ireland can indeed be British Citizens, and cars will have GB on their international identification plate, BUT Northern Ireland is not Britain.

 

It is Northern Ireland. On the island of Ireland.

 

anyone can make an error, I supposse, but does it matter?

 

the point is that all these reviews achieve much more than the whinging about inacuracies about what reviewers say, SURE I would like beter reveiws, but if it gets a reader to try hellblazer, then I have to say, I dont mind so much, if the reader likes hellblazer, they will stick with it.

 

The reviews generally read positively, they are OK, and in actual fact I am grateful that they are not leaden and boring full of facts that a new reader can find themselves at a later stage, but which might turn them off at the initial introduction point.

 

Jamesb

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'It's a pretty common mistake, but still one worth correcting. Wales is not in England, but they're both in Britain, as is Northern Ireland.'

 

I do not believe that Northern Ireland is part of Britain.

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the offical term, and as you can see it seperates Northern Ireland.

 

I meant "Britain" in the colloquial sense, which I mentioned in the subsequent explanatory post - "Britain" is sometimes misleadingly used to refer to the whole United Kingdom. I should have made that clearer, though - sorry.

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I meant "Britain" in the colloquial sense, which I mentioned in the subsequent explanatory post - "Britain" is sometimes misleadingly used to refer to the whole United Kingdom. I should have made that clearer, though - sorry.

 

Thats fair enough, its a bloody confusing thing though to be honest.

 

Of course it has reminded me of the US post boxes and yellow taxi cabs, in issue 49? or was it 48?

 

Jamesb

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For future references, John Smith is indeed English.

 

Wait a second! I thought Grant Morrison was English....I know he lives in Scotland now and has a Scottish surname, but I was sure he was born and raised in England.....Or, what are we considering here? Where the writer was born or where he currently resides or where he spent the most consecutive years of his life?

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For future references, John Smith is indeed English.

 

Wait a second! I thought Grant Morrison was English....I know he lives in Scotland now and has a Scottish surname, but I was sure he was born and raised in England.....Or, what are we considering here? Where the writer was born or where he currently resides or where he spent the most consecutive years of his life?

 

He was born in Glasgow. I'm not sure where he was raised but I know for sure he was born in Glasgow.

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I was going to say he sounds Scottish to me but then I can't recall if I have really heard him speak or if I've imagined it. But I'm pretty sure that Grant is a Scot through and through.

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I couldn't understand Grant Morrison speak, when i downloaded a video appearance of his from some convention. I think that means he's Scottish.

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Grant Morrison is, in his own drug-addled way, one of the most Scottish people you could ever hope to encounter. Really.

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But back when he did take them, he took a lot of them. Hence, "addled".

 

It wasn't a serious comment, anyway. I'd have thought that was fairly obvious.

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It wasn't supposed to sound as nasty as it might have, I just get kind of irritated by the way Morrison's name gets lumped in with drug abuse all the time on the internet, as if that's the only important part of his personality.

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For what it's worth, I think the far-more-popular-than-it-really-should-be idea that all of Morrison's "wacky ideas" must be a result of drug use is absolutely facile nonsense. Doesn't mean I'm not willing to use it for a cheap joke, though.

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Just to make things more needlessly complicated, English people like Shakespeare who were born before 1707 shouldn't be referred to as 'British'.

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I couldn't understand Grant Morrison speak, when i downloaded a video appearance of his from some convention. I think that means he's Scottish.

 

Yeah, I have a video of him from a con and I can't understand a word he says.

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