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Christian

Help Me Make a Birthday List

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Less than one month....Feb. 22nd....31 years old....

I have a list of G.N.s I'm ordering for my birthday, but I'm thinking I'm missing a few I need to own after looking through a Diamond Catalogue.

 

I'm going to give a brief lists of books I am considering, if you have read them tell me what you think of them and if I should order them.

 

1.Breakfast Afternoon by Andi Watson

 

2.I Never Liked You by Chester Brown

 

3.I know it's a crime, but I have not read any Adrian Tomine yet. I am ordering "Sleepwalk". Are there other Tomine books that I need to own?

 

OK, if you have any other recommendations, I would love to hear them.

 

SPECIAL NOTE:I am only interested in sad, lonely stories; ones dealing with loss and alienation. I want to immerse myself in depression right now.

Also note I am looking for non-genre and non-mainstream. I have probably read any Marvel or DC book of note that I care to read. I also don't want to read sci-fi or fantasy books, as good as they might be.

Thank you for your help.

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I am only interested in sad, lonely stories; ones dealing with loss and alienation. I want to immerse myself in depression right now.

Also note I am looking for non-genre and non-mainstream. I have probably read any Marvel or DC book of note that I care to read. I also don't want to read sci-fi or fantasy books, as good as they might be.

Thank you for your help.

 

loss and alienation...

 

well, you are probably gonna love Adrian Tomine. besides Sleepwalk, I'd definitely recommend his second Optic Nerve collection, 'Summer Blonde'. Tomine gets better and better as he goes further along.

 

I'd recommend Black Hole as well, based on the alienation thing. it's amazing. it's horror mix with teen angst. probably one of my top 3 graphic novels/series of all time.

 

if you want to read something beautiful on loss, I recommend Epileptic. it's a 500 page autobiographical story on how a little boy slowly loses his brother to epilepsy. it's truly heartbreaking.

 

Craig Thompson's Carnet De Voyage is also good: it's a travelogue on Thompson's journey through Europe and Morocco. it can be very selfpitying, but the wonderful saves it in those moments.

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Definitely Epileptic, although I'm thinking that's the one you ordered by "accident" from Amazon, yes?

 

Perhaps Teenagers from Mars or The Waiting Place?

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Is "The Bell Jar" a comic now? :blink: I'm thinking that would be hard to illustrate.

 

Sethos-I've read "Black Hole" and "Epileptic". Well, I haven't read "Epileptic" yet, it's on my pile of "to read", but I do own it.

I'm going to order "Summer Blonde" now.

Is "Good-bye Chunky Rice" any good? I've heard such wildly varied opinion about that story that I have no idea what to think of it!

 

Selkie-What are "Teenagers from Mars" and "The Waiting Place" about and who are the writers?

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Words can not express the depth of my loathing for Goodbye, Chunky Rice, but that puts me in a minority of one, as far as I can tell. It is a very depressing comic, though, and might fill the bill on that score.

 

Teenagers from Mars (I'll admit, I never got through this one, but based on what I did manage to choke down, it certainly had the alienation vibe going on)

 

The Waiting Place (I have book one that I'd be happy to send you - if it looks like your cuppa, drop me a note via e-mail and it'll go out tomorrow with the other.)

 

I absolutely, positively can not believe it didn't occur to me to mention Blankets. In your current situation, you need to read this book if you haven't already.

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Why did you hate Chunky Rice, Selkie? Was it the anthropomorphism or something more?

 

Yes, I have read Blankets. It ended too happily for me. :biggrin:

 

I always think of "Invaders from Home" whenever someone mentions "Teenagers from Mars".... :unsure:

Does anyone have any idea what the comic "Mars on Earth" is about? I came across it while looking for "Teenagers from Mars". It was published by Piranha Press.

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I wondered if Blanket's ending might be a problem in your quest for relentless depression :biggrin:

 

Beyond the drowned puppies with the little "x"s over their eyes, I'm not sure to this day what specificallys et me off about Chunky Rice. I wish I did. The cartooning is excellent, and I'm all for anthropomorphism when it serves the author's message. There's just something about it the evokes a visceral negative reaction that must be seen to be believed. I know I'm not the only one who feels that way about it, but apparently I'm pretty darn close.

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Like I said, I've heard nothing but mixed reactions from it.

 

I should clarify that there are 3 types of depressing for me:

 

1.Sadness, loneliness and alienation-examples,Daniel Clowes, much of Neil Gaiman's work, and Chris Ware (I worship you!). People who are on the fringe of life. Seperated from Type #3 by the fact that they aren't hanging out at the bar, getting drunk at parties to get over work, or whatever. They're messed up people who can't deal with life and don't seem to belong.

 

2.Hateful depressing-Where the author seems to go out of his way to fuck up everyone just for the sake of saying, "see? There's no happy endings!" This just leaves me cold.

 

3.Everyday depressed-Peter Bagge's "HATE" falls into this catergory, anything that takes place in bleak suburbia, or the story of an everyday marriage where the love seems far removed; and it just unnerves me. It's not the type of depression I'm looking for. It's hard to explain this. It's like "man, people's lives are so barren and desolate. I wish they'd just kill themselves, because it's hard to read this."

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Is "The Bell Jar" a comic now? :blink: I'm thinking that would be hard to illustrate.

 

Sethos-I've read "Black Hole" and "Epileptic". Well, I haven't read "Epileptic" yet, it's on my pile of "to read", but I do own it.

I'm going to order "Summer Blonde" now.

Is "Good-bye Chunky Rice" any good? I've heard such wildly varied opinion about that story that I have no idea what to think of it!

 

Selkie-What are "Teenagers from Mars" and "The Waiting Place" about and who are the writers?

 

Oh, you only want to read comics then.... Fair enough.

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Like I said, I've heard nothing but mixed reactions from it.

 

I love Chunky Rice. it's very simple, but very well done, I thought. possibly my favourite Craig Thompson book. can't believe I forgot to suggest it...

 

I should clarify that there are 3 types of depressing for me:

 

1.Sadness, loneliness and alienation-examples,Daniel Clowes, much of Neil Gaiman's work, and Chris Ware (I worship you!). People who are on the fringe of life. Seperated from Type #3 by the fact that they aren't hanging out at the bar, getting drunk at parties to get over work, or whatever. They're messed up people who can't deal with life and don't seem to belong.

 

2.Hateful depressing-Where the author seems to go out of his way to fuck up everyone just for the sake of saying, "see? There's no happy endings!" This just leaves me cold.

 

3.Everyday depressed-Peter Bagge's "HATE" falls into this catergory, anything that takes place in bleak suburbia, or the story of an everyday marriage where the love seems far removed; and it just unnerves me. It's not the type of depression I'm looking for. It's hard to explain this. It's like "man, people's lives are so barren and desolate. I wish they'd just kill themselves, because it's hard to read this."

 

and if you take all three of this, mix them up with some okay but not excellent artwork, you get the rather good "A Complete Lowlife" by Ed Brubaker. it's supposedly autobiographical, in which case Brubaker really was a complete lowlife before he went and did mainstream comics.

 

I'd also recommend Jar of Fools by Jason Lutes.

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Checking Amazon:

"Jar of Fools"=Bought!

 

What about "Clyde Fans" by Seth? "Tales of Ordinary Madness"?

 

never really read anything by Seth, unfortunately. he's still on my list to read. Wimbledon Green is supposed to be very good.

 

dunno Tales of Ordinary Madness...

 

oh, oh, another recommendation: 676 Apparitions of Killoffer by Killoffer. it's an expensive book (it's only 48 pages) but it's pretty awesome. you can read more about it HERE.

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Blood Song contains lots of depressing material about alienation and the loss of simpler, happier times, but the ending might be a trifle too uplifting for you.

 

Although I've never read it, perhaps The Tale of One Bad Rat?

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Although I've never read it, perhaps The Tale of One Bad Rat?

 

YES.

 

Also, When The Wind Blows, by Raymond Briggs. One of the best comics ever produced - and depressing as hell with it.

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Like I said, I've heard nothing but mixed reactions from it.

 

I should clarify that there are 3 types of depressing for me:

 

1.Sadness, loneliness and alienation-examples,Daniel Clowes, much of Neil Gaiman's work, and Chris Ware (I worship you!). People who are on the fringe of life. Seperated from Type #3 by the fact that they aren't hanging out at the bar, getting drunk at parties to get over work, or whatever. They're messed up people who can't deal with life and don't seem to belong.

That describes a fair number of Adrian Tomine's characters, especially in certain issues of Optic Nerve. The issue with the two highschool friends might be to your liking, but you might like the issue with Hillary Chan in it even better. If possible, glance through back issues at your comic store. (I think I have all the Optic Nerves, but unfortunately my "collection" is always in disarray. If I unearthy any of them and think they are ones you'd especially like, I"ll post the issue numbers.)

 

I like Tomine better than Clowes because his stories are less outrageous and more subdued, reading better as short fiction and successfully carrying more of a depressive sensibility.

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Here are a few (that you're probably already well aware of):

 

Pyongyang

A Journey in North Korea

by Guy Delisle

 

Safe Area

Gorazde

The War in Eastern Bosnia 1992-95

by Joe Sacco

 

Palestine

by Sacco

 

The Fixer

A Story from Sarajevo

by Sacco

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Here are a few (that you're probably already well aware of):

 

Pyongyang

A Journey in North Korea

by Guy Delisle

 

Safe Area

Gorazde

The War in Eastern Bosnia 1992-95

by Joe Sacco

 

Palestine

by Sacco

 

The Fixer

A Story from Sarajevo

by Sacco

 

 

Fixer was good!

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I can't call "Tale of One Bad Rat" depressing. I love the book, but I found it to be very life-affirming.

No, I'm not knocking it because of that! :lol:

You should read it, Selkie. I think you would really enjoy it.

 

I'm going to check out Blood Song and When the Wind Blows.

But, what else did Raymond Briggs write? I know I have read one of his books before, but can't place him.

 

Nevermind. I found it. I've read "Ethel and Ernest", the delightful biography of Briggs' parents. I thought he has only written children's book before that.

Edited by Christian

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OK, just what is McKean's "Cages" about? I've wanted to read this book since "Sandman", but can't spend $50 on one book, especially since I don't even know the plot.

I mean, if it's really about a cat who plays the piano, then yeah, I can see paying $50..... :D

 

Has anyone read "Lost At Sea"?

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OK, just what is McKean's "Cages" about? I've wanted to read this book since "Sandman", but can't spend $50 on one book, especially since I don't even know the plot.

I mean, if it's really about a cat who plays the piano, then yeah, I can see paying $50..... :D

 

Has anyone read "Lost At Sea"?

 

haven't read Lost at Sea, it's hard as nails to get over here :icon_evil:

 

Cages is about.. well.. lots of things. mostly it's about creating things. whether it's God creating the universe (the book starts with 5 different creation myths), an artist trying to create a painting and not having any inspiration, a woman creating a forest inside her house, a novelist whose writings are considered dangerous and is protected/controlled by shady characters.. the list goes on and on. Cages is FANTASTIC. my number one graphic novel of all time, in fact. 50 bucks is a lot of money, but this book is worth every penny.

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Also, When The Wind Blows, by Raymond Briggs. One of the best comics ever produced - and depressing as hell with it.

 

I'll second that emotion. The first serious comic I ever read, before the term "graphic novel" was even coined. Very moving.

 

I heard there was an animated version? IMDB confirms it, Does anyone know more about that? I'd like to see it.

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