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JohnMcMahon

What Mike Carey did next

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Christian    752

A long, long time.

Longer than I ever expected.

Through three direction changes, in fact.

 

Did you just notice Carey was on X-Men, or are you just surprised how long he's been writing it?

 

He started...before issue #200.

The book was revamped as X-Men:Legacy soon after issue 200, and was a deep continuity series starring Prof. X.

Now, the book is more of a spotlight title, featuring Rogue most prominently, for the nonce anyway.

 

I really enjoyed the continuity Carey put into the title, although it wasn't for everyone, since you needed to have a grasp of X-Men lore.

I missed the heavy continuity usage, but right now Carey is using Emplate (an old Generation X villain), and he seems to be having a lot of fun with the character.

He made the character interesting.

I especially liked the touch of Emplate having a "peep show" in his extra-dimensional lair, and when Rogue looked through it, it featured an old B&W movie sequence, referencing the earliest films. "Your enemies are plotting against you!". You could just hear the grainy music.

That's in issue #228.

 

Anyway...so, he's been on the book for about 3 years now, I'd say.

Best of all, Carey seems to like Gambit too, so I don't feel so bad for being a fan of Gambit now.

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Spain    66

And whatever happened with James?

 

Gambit was a strange character for me. I don't read Marvel (just read Cable and some of Deadpool, actually one of my favourite Marvel characters) but have some knowledge from most of the mutants, and Gambit was always like a "meh" for me. Only after watching the movie about Wolverine I said, OK, Gambit may be interesting.

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Shawn    297

I had not read much of Carey’s X-Men until this new Nation-X thing. I rather like it with Rogue being portrayed as an interesting character that I didn’t care for previously. Also, I am a huge fan of Daniel Acuna. And wow, Emplate as a seriously, dangerous threat. Well done Carey. I will be buying more of this book.

So I guess X-Men: Legacy now fills the gap of New Mutants/Young X-Men/New X-Men/Gen-X with an X-Man serving as a teacher/mentor to a younger group of mutants.

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dogpoet    463

I keep meaning to investigate this (Generation X was about the only X men title I could be doing with in the mid '90s, and I even gave up on that one when Scott Lobdell stopped writing it), but haven't.

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Christian    752

Generation X actually stayed reasonably decent through most of its run.

James Robinson followed Lobdell.

Skip the Larry Hama horror.

Then, Jay Faerber took over.

There was that Ellis thing, which was disapointing, but Brian Wood took over after Ellis.

 

On a related note, John Francis Moore's run on X-Force, occurring roughly when Faerber was on Gen-X was wonderful.

Both books existed outside the usual X-world. Gen-X being about mutant kids at school, and X-Force being about late-teens/early-20s mutants just out of school trying to figure out what to do in life.

Quite different than what X-Men was doing during that period.

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Rogan    176

Mike wrote an X-men game :

 

The story, by Marvel writer Mike Carey, give you many opportunities to decide where your loyalties lie, deeply customizable characters and powers, and features all your favorite mutants, including Magneto, Cyclops, Wolverine, Quicksilver, Colossus, Surge, Nightcrawler, Wolverine and Gambit.

Each character has passive abilities and upgradable core powers. You can also add special attacks by spending experience points and making choices throughout the game. You control the special attacks by collecting M power, which is represented by the blue meter in the upper left hand corner. As you build up your M power by pulling off successful combinations and collecting orbs, you open up new special attacks, each progressively more powerful. Of course, the special attacks drain your M power. Your critical attack, which is the most powerful will drain you entirely, leaving you vulnerable.

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Christian    752

Sounds good, like X-Men:Legacy, but with more freedom...like those new fangled Star Wars games I never got to play where you could be a Jedi or a Sith depending on your actions during the game.

I'm surprised how much Carey likes X-Men. He's been on X-Men:Legacy longer than any other comics he's worked on except Lucifer now.

 

Speaking of, X-Men:Legacy #250 came out this week and unveils Carey's new team for the book. I'm impressed, as I feel Carey chose a pretty interesting line-up of personalities to craft a team around.

It's also nice to see an actual X-Men team nowadays, since the X-Men titles have been about using every mutant available, rather than having a core roster of characters to focus on.

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A. Heathen    1,131

He was telling us about the folks incensed by the Rogue and Magneto thing.

That amused me.

 

It inspires my work on John Constantine and Epiphany Greaves-Constantine.

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A. Heathen    1,131

How do folks feel about Carey's run on X-men?

I read the most recent six episodes and quite liked it but it does have an unsatisfying link to continuity that I have not followed.

 

Anyway, he is free of that now. Hurrah !

 

I read an ashcan of some stories from the book Steel Seraglio which Mike's written with his wife Lin and daughter Louise.

An arabian nights type setting with the Djinns applying a Monkey's Paw technique to their wish-granting. Nice stuff.

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Christian    752

Carey must have enjoyed writing X-Men, because he stayed on the book for a very long time. Far longer than I expected him to.

His run is broken up into different chunks, based on what editorial wanted from the title at the time.

It started out as Carey writing X-Men stories he wanted to tell, then it turned into a heavy continuity series referencing all the great X-Men plots that had been forgotten since the Jemas days, after which it was supposed to be a Rogue spotlight book, but then it turned back into Carey getting to tell X-Men stories he wanted to tell (although this time in the backwaters of X-Men continuity, since the book was no longer considered an important one by Marvel editors).

I really enjoyed Carey on the title for the first half of his run. The use of heavy continuity wasn't for everyone, but I've been reading X-Men since the early-1980s and own every issue except 1963's #1, so it was a joy to relive those happier days for me.

I started to get bored with the book by the time editorial stepped in and decided to change directions again, but the book started to congeal as one of the better X-books again when Carey created his new team for the book. It was all short-lived though, as Marvel set about rebooting their X-line, but that's ok, as Carey needed to leave at some point. Carey is no longer needed as Jason Aaron seems to be writing a X-Men book that long-time readers actually want to read now.

Certainly not Carey's best work, but not bad either. Better than what Fraction and whoever else has been doing on their X-Men books during the time that Carey spent on this title.

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JohnMcMahon    566
How do folks feel about Carey's run on X-men?

 

Unsurprisingly, I haven't read it but kudos to the man for lasting seven (SEVEN!) years on one of the main X-books - that's got to be some kind of record!

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Dr. Fleming    5
How do folks feel about Carey's run on X-men?

 

Unsurprisingly, I haven't read it but kudos to the man for lasting seven (SEVEN!) years on one of the main X-books - that's got to be some kind of record!

 

A certain Chris Claremont would like to have some words with you :).

 

But yes, impressive.

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Christian    752

Actually, I was trying to figure out when the last time a writer lasted as long as Carey on a main X-Men title.

Could Carey somehow have set the record as second longest behind only Claremont?

I don't think Lodbell lasted seven years on one X-book, and I think Lobdell had the prior record for second place.

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