Jump to content
JohnMcMahon

What Mike Carey did next

Recommended Posts

Christian    752

And, well it deserves to be! :)

 

I'm just thinking that this is a very different type of series for Marvel. Usually, Marvel only likes to publish books that use their already established characters. But, yeah, maybe this is just an attempt to jam a bunch of Marvel mystical characters into one book....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark    333

Tom - according to the man himself when he met us all in the Ship, he's working on a 'Legends of the Dark Knight' arc at some point soon, which should be published in about 2 years or so. I don't think he said anything about not mentioning that to anyone...if he did, well, I was drunk. He's only got himself to blame. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Christian    752

TWO fucking years????!

I heard about this LOTDK arc on the 'net somewhere, and I was thinking it was going to be the next story-arc! I was all excited, thinking DC cared about LOTDK again and was getting hot*, talented writers on the book again (*yeah, I think Carey's cute, wanna make something of it?! :biggrin: )....Now, you're telling me it's going to be TWO YEARS before DC starts caring again?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnMcMahon    566

Here's the cover for Spellbinders #1

 

Mike Carey on Castor and Constantine

http://www.thealienonline.net/ao_030.asp?t...scid=2&iid=2673

 

Knowing that comics writer Mike Carey signed a book deal with Darren Nash at Orbit publishers wasn't enough for us. We decided we needed to know more and went in search of Carey to enquire about his first foray into the world of novel writing...

 

"The Castor novels are set in London in the present day - but it's a present day where the fact that the dead return is taken for granted," Carey explained when we found him. "Since just before the millennium, there's been a huge upsurge in hauntings and supernatural activity of all kinds, to the point where the most sceptical and pragmatic people now have to accept that death is not the end. Some people return as ghosts, others enjoy (if that's the right word) a bodily resurrection as zombies. And since the dead outnumber the living by about twenty to one, and since they're sometimes not the most sociable of creatures, there's suddenly a great call for exorcists: people who have the necessary skills and training to dispel the risen dead either back to their graves or onward to whatever awaits them next.

 

"That's what Felix Castor, the protagonist of the novels, does for a living: he binds and dismisses the dead. But he doesn't get the power to do this from any religious conviction: he just has a natural gift. In many ways he's less like the fighting priests of the Exorcist movies and more like a Chandleresque gumshoe: down at heel, cynical, in it for the money."

 

The novels fit nicely into Orbit's growing production of top-notch supernatural thrillers, joining Laurel K Hamilton, Kelley Armstrong, Tanya Huff and others. "The books are essentially crime novels," Carey agreed. "And they take place against this backdrop of a world which humankind is suddenly having to share with a scary menagerie of supernatural beings. And gradually we'll begin to get some indications as to why this is happening and what its deeper implications are.

 

"There's also a female protagonist, introduced part-way into the first book, who becomes first a foil for Castor and then a lead character in her own right. She's not fully human, but she doesn't belong to any of the obvious categories of undead either: she's frankly very scary, but also in some odd ways more sympathetic than Castor himself."

 

With Carey's background in comics like Lucifer and Inferno, you might expect the novels to be illustrated. "No, that's not the plan," he said. "A comics adaptation isn't out of the question at some point, but these are just straight-down-the-line novels. There'll be margins, though. People can draw pictures in the margins if they want..."

 

One of Carey's illustrated stories is due for release in late January instead - his new graphic novel, Constantine: All His Engines, with artwork by Leonardo Manco, is leading the spearhead of publicity for the new Constantine movie starring Keanu Reeves.

 

Titan Books are releasing three graphic novels – a Carey, a Gaiman and a Grant Morrison – in January and February 2005 to introduce Hellblazer and John Constantine to the movie-goers. In All His Engines, a worldwide plague puts millions into comas. When it strikes down the granddaughter of Chas Chandler, one of the Hellblazer’s closest friends, John Constantine steps in with the "cure." However, in scratching the surface of a seemingly personal tragedy, he finds a mad demon in a body woven out of cancer cells, and a plot to build franchised Hells in the cities of men. To rescue a single innocent child from the clutches of evil, both John and Chas will have to face temptations they never dreamed of, forging alliances with monsters every bit as terrible as the ones they're fighting…

 

For Carey, there are some significant differences between writing for Hellblazer and his other well-known character, Lucifer Morningstar. "In many ways Lucifer and John Constantine are superficially very similar characters: both blond, both bastards, both a lot cleverer than most of the people they meet, and both as good with a put-down as a butcher is with a bone-saw.

 

"But the big difference is that John is human and Lucifer isn't. Lucifer is a monster in a very literal sense: incapable of empathy, incapable of change, so self-regarding that he regards his own convenience and his own freedom of action as being the only thing that matters in the whole of God's creation.

 

"John is ruthless, yes, but he's ruthless in a more understandable way – a more human way. And when human beings do terrible things, they have to live with the consequences of those things. We see John as someone who has thrown himself or possibly been dragged into the breach between Earth and Hell. For a whole slew of reasons, some of them altruistic and some of them a lot more selfish and tangled, he fights this fight, and he'll do anything to get it done. He routinely lies, cheats and steals, and when he has to he betrays his friends with a degree of cold calculation that's absolutely chilling. But we also see him as a man who's haunted (literally) by these decisions that he's had to make: he can never just forget the harm he's done or absolve himself because the end justifies the means. He carries the weight of his memories on him palpably."

 

For more information about the author, check out the Lucifer Morningstar website.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A. Heathen    1,131

No-one seen The Barker ?

 

Quite enjoyable in the way that Kelley Jones "Hammer" was, and decidedly inappropriate for the back of a Batman book.

 

Best option will be to collect them and let Mr Carey flesh it out to graphic novel size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
James    38

Shit, is that out already? Which issue of Detective Comics is it?

 

I was slightly unsure about the Castor books since they sounded a wee bit familiar, but this talk of a world where ghosts and zombies are a routine nuisance rather than a rare and mysterious occurance has me sold. I have a thing about not buying books in hardback, though, so I might just get it from the library till the paperback comes out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rogan    176

Oh, yes, The Barker shows great promise, and i love to see those carny customs... lights - carny revenge, the stogie goes around the circle, anyone who's in takes a puff... great stuff...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnMcMahon    566

Ummmmm....I had a dream of Mike Carey last night.

 

He was taking a penalty for Barca in a European Cup match against Chelsea, he scored it too.

 

In other news, Carey's writing an upcoming Red Sonja comic with art by Mike 'Fairy Porn' Oeming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sethos    5
Ummmmm....I had a dream of Mike Carey last night.

 

He was taking a penalty for Barca in a European Cup match against Chelsea, he scored it too.

 

In other news, Carey's writing an upcoming Red Sonja comic with art by Mike 'Fairy Porn' Oeming.

 

fairy porn? do I even want to know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rogan    176

i want fairy porn!

 

 

Kudos on Red Sonja, Mr. Carey!

 

 

James - #801 was this month's release, i think... go get it now. :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnMcMahon    566
fairy porn? do I even want to know?

 

Oeming was doing a signing in Gosh comics before the con in London - he showed up with a stack load of his black'n'white self-published opus Sixteen Naked Faeries.

 

Mike showed up in The Ship with a bundle of them - the kicker being that there are only 15 naked faeries in it.

 

Terrible, terrible thing. He's a good artist though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
James    38

Has Rogan not made a "Fairy porn/Carey porn" joke yet? No? Then I'll do it for him, but only because I want to ruin John's dreams tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonT    443

VIA JOHN:

When fifteen-year-old Kim Vesco moves from Chicago to Salem, MA, she finds that the local student body is divided into rival factions of witches and non-witches

 

Of course. I wonder what real-life Salem high school kids will think of that? :)

 

 

Titan Books are releasing three graphic novels - a Carey, a Gaiman and a Grant Morrison - in January and February 2005 to introduce Hellblazer and John Constantine to the movie-goers

 

What are the Gaiman and Morrison books? I've only heard of Mike's.

 

- Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
James    38

Bit of poor writing, there. Of the three "graphic novels", only Carey's "All His Engines" is a true graphic novel; the other two are standard TPB collections. And they only contain issues by Gaiman and Morrison, they're not written by those authors in their entirety.

 

Neil Gaiman's issue of Hellblazer (27, "Hold Me") is being reprinted in "Constantine: The Hellblazer Collection" though it's already been reprinted in "Neil Gaiman's Midnight Days" anyway. The Hellblazer Collection also features the Constantine movie-to-comic adaptation (also sold seperately), issue 1 (already printed in "Original Sins") and issue 41 (already printed in "Dangerous Habits"). It's a big rip-off, basically.

 

Morrison's two issues (25, "Early Warning" and 26, "How I Learned to Love the Bomb") are going to be collected in the far more appealing "Hellblazer: Rare Cuts," alongside previously uncollected issues by Ennis and Delano.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
James    38

Yup.

 

And I made a mistake - the Dangerous Habits issue is actually #42, the one where he meets The First of the Fallen, which is a great introduction to our John but seems a bit silly without the set-up or conclusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonT    443

Thanks, James - I thought new material from Gaiman & Morrison was too good to be true.

 

And yeah, the Constantine collection does sound like a ripoff. If they need a collection of self-contained stories to appeal the movie crowd, what's wrong with the Rare Cuts collection?

 

Nice going including the adaptation in the trade. Will it be the first comic ever to appear in collected form before its publication as a standalone issue? :)

 

- Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Christian    752

It's just that damn good!

 

Any new reader who shells out those bucks for that "Constantine:Rip-Off" Trade after they see the movie will NEVER buy a Hellblazer comic book again, I tell ya!

Who wants to buy a book with 2 (of 4) stories being "To Be Continued...." and find out they have to spend (at least) $30 more to get the complete stories?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark    333

I'm particularly pissed off that 'Hold Me' isn't being put in the Rare Cuts trade, where it clearly belongs. Mainly because it's nigh-on impossible to find it as a back issue these days, unless you've got silly money. Clearly someone at Vertigo realized that no fan of the comics was going to shell out for the Hellblazer Collection trade unless they put something in there which will appeal to them (frankly, if the trade is aimed at people who've seen the film but aren't familiar with the comics, there are plenty of other standalone issues which would have been more suitable for that purpose than #27 anyway, wonderful as it is). Money-grubbing [over-used word]s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
James    38

It is available in the Midnight Days trade though, Mark, and since the point of "Rare Cuts" is that the issues have never been collected before it would undermine the entire collection to put it in.

 

If they absolutely HAVE to include #1 and #42 in The Hellblazer Collection then I'd rather they use #27 than an uncollected issue so that Hellblazer fans can ignore it altogether.

 

Man, I just remembered that half of issue 1 relies on the reader's familiarity with Moore's Swamp Thing run. I really have no idea what newcomers will think to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×