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lyra

Your favorite film from each decade 1910-200-

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Two films per decade. modifed

 

1910's Das Cabinet Des DR. Caligari

1920's Nosferatu

1930's M

1940's Rebecca

1950's Seven Samurai

1960's Yojimbo

1970's Star Wars

1980's Blade Runner

1990's Fight Club

2000 Fellowship of the Ring

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Forgive me if my years are off....I'm not good at remembering years....

Also, I'm doing this as "first movie that comes to mind must be the best!", which usually isn't the case, but it's the best way not to over-think it all.

 

1910s-Not sure I've seen any!

1920s-Metropolis

1930s-World Gone Mad

1940s-Mission to Moscow

1950s-The Thing from Another World

1960s-Dr. Strangelove

1970s-Repulsion

1980s-Matinee

1990s-Gods & Monsters

2000s-Lost in Translation

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Like Christian, this is very much an "off the top of my head" list.

 

1910s: Honestly can't think of one.

1920s: Battleship Potemkin

1930s: All Quiet On The Western Front

1940s: The Third Man

1950s: The Searchers

1960s: 8 1/2

1970s: Apocalypse Now (tough call, this one - the '70s are my favourite decade for American cinema)

1980s: Withnail & I

1990s: The Big Lebowski

2000s: Mulholland Dr.

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I cannot answer this one in good conscience as it is totally impossible for me to pick one film for any decade barring the 20s. For the 20s it would be Battleship Potemkin.

 

And to think that I love these list posts :mad:

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Interestingly this is similar to something we are doing at the cinema at the moment.

 

It is the 70th birthday of the place and so we are asking our customers to vote on which movies which should show from each decade it's been open. It is somewhat constrained by what's available.

 

Anway for the 30s the movie The Adventures of Robin Hood was chosen by popular vote and was shown a few months ago.

 

Brief Encounter won the 40s vote

 

Monsieur Hulot's Holiday won the vote for the 50s and will be shown this weekend.

 

We shall then satrt to draw up a shortlist of movies from the 60s.

 

My own personal list will take some thinking but I'll come back here when I've decided.

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Who cares every film ever is just SCARFACE's bitch.

 

God scarface i cant believe they let that one fly, god i love it.

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Keeping in mind I haven't seen too much old-school cinema:

 

'10s: Don't think I've seen one.

'20s: Ditto

'30s: M

'40s: Casablanca

'50s: Vertigo

'60s: Dr. Strangelove

'70s: A Clockwork Orange

'80s: Blade Runner

'90s: Miller's Crossing

'00s: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

 

I'd also like to add that this is in no way a definitive list.

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We shall then satrt to draw up a shortlist of movies from the 60s.

 

My own personal list will take some thinking but I'll come back here when I've decided.

 

For the 60s there has to be major competition between The Wild Bunch, Bonnie & Clyde and Midnight Cowboy.

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All great films, but hardly the be-all and end-all of '60s cinema, either. Personally, I'd say that Dr. Strangelove, Lawrence Of Arabia, Yojimbo, Breathless, In The Heat Of The Night, Psycho, 8 1/2, Rosemary's Baby and To Kill A Mockingbird are all at least as good as the three you mention, some of them better. That's hardly a definitive list, but it's certainly not just a three-horse race.

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All great films, but hardly the be-all and end-all of '60s cinema, either. Personally, I'd say that Dr. Strangelove, Lawrence Of Arabia, Yojimbo, Breathless, In The Heat Of The Night, Psycho, 8 1/2, Rosemary's Baby and To Kill A Mockingbird are all at least as good as the three you mention, some of them better. That's hardly a definitive list, but it's certainly not just a three-horse race.

 

Oh certainly. Never meant to say it was. Was just musing about my personal favourites from the decade, there. Though now that you mention it, I'd add Strangelove, Psycho, Rosemary's Baby (which I keep mistakenly thinking of as a 70s movie) and 8 1/2 to those favourites. I never rated Lawrence of Arabia or In the Heat of the Night as highly as those others though.

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What about two films per decade. I found it hard to choose only one especially after 1950.

 

1910's Das Cabinet Des DR. Caligari/ Charlie Chaplin: The Circus

1920's Nosferatu/ Metropolis

1930's M/ Frankenstein

1940's Rebecca/ The Great Dictator

1950's Seven Samurai/ The Day the Earth Stood still

1960's Yojimbo/ The Wild Bunch

1970's Star Wars/ Chinatown

1980's Blade Runner/The Thing

1990's Fight Club/ Terminator two

2000 Fellowship of the Ring/ Memento

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sigh....Let's see if I can do this again.

Second choices for each decade:

 

1910s-Didn't see any before, how can I have a second one?! heh

1920s-Nosferatu

1930s-The Maniac

1940s-The Red Menace (HA!)

1950s-Psycho

1960s-Rosemary's Baby

1970s-Chinatown

1980s-Breakfast Club (!)

1990s-Leaving Las Vegas

2000s-Insomnia

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1950s: The Searchers

 

 

Can you (or anyone really) tell me why this is supposed to be such a great goddamn movie. All I found to admire in it is its technical proficiency and some of its performances. I hear a lot about how its the most American movie ever - well, I dunno, I wasnt sympathizing with the Comanches but I wasnt sympathizing with the guys with guns that stole their land either. And as for being the template for the traditional Western, I dont see whats so impressive about that either. The Western is a highly overrated mythology in its traditional form: I hate that cowboys and Indians bullshit. The only point in which the western held any interest for me was when the genre was subverted, like in The Wild Bunch or Unforgiven or McCabe and Mrs Miller.

 

I just really dont see what there is of any real substance to this movie other than this tremendous aura of mythological Americana. And I'm sure people will make fun of the fact that I find the movie and its ilk vaguely distasteful in this day and age but I do.

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I dunno, I wasnt sympathizing with the Comanches but I wasnt sympathizing with the guys with guns that stole their land either.

 

You might want to watch it again, and this time realise that you're not supposed to. It's more subtle than The Wild Bunch, and definitely a product of an earlier time, but in its own way, The Searchers is easily as radical a subversion of the classic Western as any of the later films you mention - and for its time, considerably more so. John Wayne - John fucking Wayne, archetypal hero of the traditional Western and avatar of all things great, noble and American - plays a complete sociopath, who is in many ways the least sympathetic character in the entire film. It's hard to fully appreciate that now, but while it's not quite on a par with Henry Fonda shooting the kid in Once Upon A Time In The West, it's a pretty major step in that direction. As for it's status as the Great American Epic, well - I'd be willing to make a case for that, certainly, and the key aspect I'd focus on would be the film's moral ambiguity. Wayne's character, in particular, exemplarises that complexity - the final shot, where he stands excluded and lonely in the doorway is an incredibly potent metaphor for modern America's relationship with the realities of its own history - it's at once a mythologization and a repudiation of what figures like Wayne actually stand for. On a superficial level, they're heroes to be celebrated - noble pioneers, brave warriors, bold frontiersmen - but underneath that is the awareness of the genocide they played a key part in, and that's something from which The Searchers never shies away. Wayne is the spectre of the Old West - an outsider who nevertheless played a key role in establishing the peace in which the family sit at the end of the film, excluded due to his unwillingness and/or inability to set aside his bigotry & hatred.

 

The "technical proficiency" which you seem to regard pretty dismissively is a big part of the film's appeal, too - Ford is a masterful craftsman, and one of the most influential directors of the last century. Certainly Peckinpah, Coppolla, Scorcese, Spielberg, and most of the great directors of the '70s owe him a massive debt - he wrote sizeable chunks of the film-making rulebook, and his legacy still holds considerable sway over the better aspects of modern American cinema.

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I also dont like Western. Mark, which film would you recommend to gain a neat entry in the Western world?

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I dunno, I wasnt sympathizing with the Comanches but I wasnt sympathizing with the guys with guns that stole their land either.

 

 

The "technical proficiency" which you seem to regard pretty dismissively is a big part of the film's appeal, too - Ford is a masterful craftsman, and one of the most influential directors of the last century. Certainly Peckinpah, Coppolla, Scorcese, Spielberg, and most of the great directors of the '70s owe him a massive debt - he wrote sizeable chunks of the film-making rulebook, and his legacy still holds considerable sway over the better aspects of modern American cinema.

 

Well, I'd heard the interpretation of which you speak and I somehow never bought it. Perhaps I should watch it again, you're right, its been a good six or seven years.

 

I'm aware of Ford's influence in the technical realm. Not being dismissive of it. It's just that I never considered technical accomplishment alone as sufficient reason to deem a film as classic.

 

But all right, you sold me on a rewatch.

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Mark, that is a superb reading of The Searchers.

You've definitely expanded it past it's usual and limited reading of racism.

Well done. :sleep:

 

On the matter of The Wild Bunch, I think that Peckinpah's own Pat Garret & Billy the Kid is far subtle done.

It stands alongside his Ride the High Country as the best westerns that he made, and in the case of Pat Garret & Billy the Kid, one of the best ever made.

Thematically, Unforgiven is a retread of Pat Garret & Billy the Kid, done well but less subtlely.

 

I'd hate to say this but Easy Rider cannot be ignored.

I know that it's almost become too big for it's own good, and like films like Alfie have been digested into popular culture, and somehow lost it's sting.

 

Cassavette's Faces too.

 

The Three Colours Trilogy should atleast be mentioned in the 90's.

Personally, the obvious gimick in the trilogies pitch can leave a bad taste, but Kieslowski was one of the best practioners of film language ever, especially during the 90's.

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I also dont like Western. Mark, which film would you recommend to gain a neat entry in the Western world?

 

Mark will probably be able to help you out more on the traditional westerns front but some great newer ones are Unforgiven, McCabe and Mrs Miller, The Wild Bunch (which I mentioned before) and the various Sergio Leone westerns are very good. A very weird example of the western that is well worth watching is Jodorowsky's El Topo.

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1910s Battleship Potemkin

1920s The Phantom Of The Opera

1930s Taxi

1940s A Matter Of Life And Death

1950s The Sweet Smell Of Success

1960s The Wild Bunch

1970s Theatre Of Blood

1980s Time Bandits

1990s Tombstone

2000s Audition

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I also dont like Western. Mark, which film would you recommend to gain a neat entry in the Western world?

 

Mark will probably be able to help you out more on the traditional westerns front but some great newer ones are Unforgiven, McCabe and Mrs Miller, The Wild Bunch (which I mentioned before) and the various Sergio Leone westerns are very good. A very weird example of the western that is well worth watching is Jodorowsky's El Topo.

There's also Django, Johnny Guitar, Pat Garret and Billy The Kid, The Long Riders and High Plains Drifter...

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FAVORITE not BEST so don't get all mad at me.

 

 

1910's: Birth of a MF-ing Nation/Dr. Calgari

1920's: Nosferatu/Zorro

1930's: All Quiet on the Western Front/Duck Soup

1940's: Citizen Kane/......Grapes of Wrath

1950's: 12 Angry Men/High Noon

1960's: 2001/The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

1970's: Godfather Part II/Rocky

 

 

Ok and for the '80s (my favorite): Aliens/Empire Strikes Back/Ghostbusters/Blues Brothers/Road Warrior(Mad Max 2)/Wrath of Khan/Predator/Die Hard/Conan/Escape from New York/Airplane/Evil Dead 2/Full Metal Jacket/Raiders of the Lost Ark/The Princess Bride/Labyrinth/The Naked Gun/Dozens more that I can't think of right now.

 

1990's: Braveheart/Big Lebowski/Reservoir Dogs

2000's (so far): Fellowship of the Ring Extended Version/Batman Begins

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