Jump to content
Jon

Did Alan Moore really meet Constantine

Recommended Posts

I was just reading about moore´s supposed sightings of a real life John constantine.

I dont know,i find it hard to believe,but then again whe live in a weird little planet.So,what do you think,could it have been possible?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"One interesting anecdote that I should point out is that one day, I was in Westminster in London -- this was after we had introduced the character -- and I was sitting in a sandwich bar. All of a sudden, up the stairs came John Constantine. He was wearing the trenchcoat, a short cut -- he looked -- no, he didn't even look exactly like Sting. He looked exactly like John Constantine. He looked at me, stared me straight in the eyes, smiled, nodded almost conspiratorially, and then just walked off around the corner to the other part of the snack bar. I sat there and thought, should I go around that corner and see if he is really there, or should I just eat my sandwich and leave? I opted for the latter; I thought it was the safest. I'm not making any claims to anything. I'm just saying that it happened. Strange little story." - Alan Moore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah,he also said that once he came up to him and whispered to his ear: "i will tell you the ultimate secret of magic.Any [over-used word] could do it"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, but that comes from a fictionalised version of the story, in the Snakes & Ladders book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, but that comes from a fictionalised version of the story, in the Snakes & Ladders book.

 

 

ok,but the fact that he says he meet him still exists.

 

I was thinking,it would be pretty crazy that every time a character is created a real life persona begins to exist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nah.But i cant help thinking what if it did happen....i mean,triying to get into moore{s head when he "saw" him.If it did happen it must have been one hell of a shock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neil Gaiman met "Death" on an airline flight too.

It can be pretty common for writers who create a fictional character based on what could be a real person, and then really get close to that person, to end up meeting that character in reality.

There can be a level of obsessiveness with writers and these characters and obsessions can lead to weird occurrences in your life.

I'm sure that both Moore and Gaiman met people who they thought were their fictional characters come to life, what I really wonder though is if they saw that same person, would they still be so convinced that the two looked exactly alike?

 

I'm more interested in the story of....Schwartz, was it?....He claimed that he met Superman in real life.

That Superman has become an archtypical image in the collective unconscious of humanity and that his image is now a Tulpa.

He claims it's the truth and wrote a book about his meetings with Superman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He claimed that he met Superman in real life.

 

 

Did he see him fly and bend steel? How about the Kryptonite factor...like where do you get it? Or was he simply saying he met someone who took on the presona.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

or did he meet one of many socalled "every day heroes"??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neil Gaiman met "Death" on an airline flight too.

It can be pretty common for writers who create a fictional character based on what could be a real person, and then really get close to that person, to end up meeting that character in reality.

There can be a level of obsessiveness with writers and these characters and obsessions can lead to weird occurrences in your life.

I'm sure that both Moore and Gaiman met people who they thought were their fictional characters come to life, what I really wonder though is if they saw that same person, would they still be so convinced that the two looked exactly alike?

 

I'm more interested in the story of....Schwartz, was it?....He claimed that he met Superman in real life.

That Superman has become an archtypical image in the collective unconscious of humanity and that his image is now a Tulpa.

He claims it's the truth and wrote a book about his meetings with Superman.

It's the chicken and the egg scenario again isn't it.

Like many sychronetic events, it's which came first and does that even matter?

 

Christian, if you recall that books title, please let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
An Unlikely Prophet by Alvin Schwartz

It's quite easy to meet people who ressemble or act like comic characters to a certain extant.

 

Delano has mentioned seeing Constantine walk by the local library. But really, the look of John isnt really that different from anybody else.

 

Like most characters, they are all based upon people those writers know or have met. I'm sure Peter Parker could be based off of one of Stan's friends nephews or brothers.

 

Meeting Superman is also rather easy, it's pretty easy to meet a reporter or person that looks and maybe acts like Clark Kent. Now if that person ran off and flew into the sky to save the day, then I would be amazed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It goes beyond claims that someone looking like Clark Kent was walking around.

The book actually claims that Superman is an archetypical image that is used by Tulpas.

Schwartz relates something about his trip to Hawaii, where he heard a tribal legend about a flying man who saved the island from an exploding volcano. When Schwartz showed the native relating the story a picture of Superman, the man said that was who saved the village.

Yeah, it's a really farfetched and explainable story, but Schwartz took it as more proof that Superman existed in the collective unconscious of humanity. The book really reads as Schwartz believing everything he writes and seeing it as proof of his encounter with Superman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol: I wouldnt doubt that Superman is indeed part of old folklore and stories. But unless he got drunk and walked into the filming of the old Superman movies, I say he was merely just losing his mind.

 

There are people out there who have the personality of said comic characters, and maybe looks. But i highly doubt they have any Super powers or abilities, and really saving people from a volcano. Coulda used a jetpack or something along those lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here. I got a book description off of Amazon.com:

 

A profound investigation into the shifting nature of identity and reality

 

• Looks at the ways thought is embodied and how it takes on a life of its own

 

• Shows how Superman, an archetype of popular culture, is a perfect example of the nonlocality of quantum physics

 

Writer Alvin Schwartz received a great deal of attention from fans when he began talking publicly about his seventeen-year stint writing Superman and Batman comics. One of the individuals who contacted him was no ordinary fan, but a seven-foot Buddhist monk named Thongden, a tulpa or individual who was thought into being by a Tibetan mystic. Thongden put Alvin Schwartz on the path without form, an amazing journey he took in the company of Hawaiian kahunas, quantum physicists, and superheroes. Superman, as it turns out, is also a tulpa, a being created by thought that takes on a life of its own and, in Mr. Schwartz’s words, is an archetype expressing the sense of nonlocality that is always present in the back of our minds--that capacity to be everywhere instantly. Superman is one of the specific forms that embodies our reality when we’re at our highest point, when we’re truly impermeable, indestructible, totally concentrated, and living entirely in the now, a condition each of us actually attains from time to time.

 

Alvin Schwartz’s story is a personal journey through a lifelong remembrance of synchrony, inspiration, accident, and magic. As it unfolds it puts into vivid clarity the saving grace that inhabits every moment of our lives. The author travels as a stranger in a strange land, whose greatest oddity is that this land is our own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing about Alan Moore is you have to take into consideration that at the time he was heavily into drugs.

 

Morrison has also mentioned that times when he was writing for the Invisibles. Events in the book actually happened to him. Again, he was also into acid and drugs at the time. So it's very likelly that he couldv seen something else. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The other thing about Alan Moore is you have to take into consideration that at the time he was heavily into drugs.

Fair point, but his story doesn't make any far-fetched claims; he never actually says he met a fictional character. He just saw someone who seemed to him to fit the appearance of Constantine. This may or may not have been due to his (presumably) intense focus on the character at the time — in the same way that, say, Star Trek fans get so into it that they can tend to see everyday things in terms of Star Trek. (Christian, is there a word for this?)

 

As for Superman, 'scuse me if I've misinterpreted what folks are saying in the thread, but I think he's more than a pop culture archetype; he's a human archetype that existed long before the comicbook character of the same name. Hence the success of the character.

 

Re the Schwartz-in-Hawaii incident, who's the bigger wack job? Schwartz, for showing a witness a picture of a comic book character, or the witness, for stringing him along? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The other thing about Alan Moore is you have to take into consideration that at the time he was heavily into drugs.

Fair point, but his story doesn't make any far-fetched claims; he never actually says he met a fictional character. He just saw someone who seemed to him to fit the appearance of Constantine. This may or may not have been due to his (presumably) intense focus on the character at the time — in the same way that, say, Star Trek fans get so into it that they can tend to see everyday things in terms of Star Trek. (Christian, is there a word for this?)

 

As for Superman, 'scuse me if I've misinterpreted what folks are saying in the thread, but I think he's more than a pop culture archetype; he's a human archetype that existed long before the comicbook character of the same name. Hence the success of the character.

 

Re the Schwartz-in-Hawaii incident, who's the bigger wack job? Schwartz, for showing a witness a picture of a comic book character, or the witness, for stringing him along? :)

 

Well, Schwartz was living in search of Superman at the time. So, he found it a synchronous event.

 

Like I said before, when one is obsessed with something (as the case can be with writer's who really get into the head of a certain character), strange things seem to occur in reality relating to the obsession. Thinks that if one looks back at the event, after distancing oneself a bit from the obsession, seem improbable or even irrational.

Yes....there's a term....

umm....Having trouble thinking....

Synchronicity.

Delusional.

Projecting.

Not quite the word I'm looking for....

Obsessive Projection of Delusional Synchronicity will do for now.

OPDS for short. The drug companies will start making a drug soon. Watch for it!

 

Are you referring to Nietszche's Ubermensch when you refer to Superman representing humanity?

There really isn't a distinction between pop-culture archetypes, human archetypes, etc. There are just archetypes.

When we were referring to archetypes, we were doing so in Jungian terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The other thing about Alan Moore is you have to take into consideration that at the time he was heavily into drugs.

 

Morrison has also mentioned that times when he was writing for the Invisibles. Events in the book actually happened to him. Again, he was also into acid and drugs at the time. So it's very likelly that he couldv seen something else. :lol:

Grant Morrison is currently planning to discover a way to travel through 3-dimensional reality by way of 2-dimensional reality.

Morrison plans to trade places with King Mob as his final act of magic, occuring 12/24/12.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing about Alan Moore is you have to take into consideration that at the time he was heavily into drugs.

 

Morrison has also mentioned that times when he was writing for the Invisibles. Events in the book actually happened to him. Again, he was also into acid and drugs at the time. So it's very likelly that he couldv seen something else. :lol:

Grant Morrison is currently planning to discover a way to travel through 3-dimensional reality by way of 2-dimensional reality.

Morrison plans to trade places with King Mob as his final act of magic, occuring 12/24/12.

Well theres really nothing wrong with that. I mean who DOESNT want to travel through 3-dimeniosnal reality by way of 2-dimensional reality. It's a really thought risky and reality damaging scenario. I have tried before, but each time I do. I end up where I was the last goddamn time. Teaching some class at Arkham university and stopping some blue collar guy from unleashing the hordes of Cthululu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I do recall is that Morrison mentioned that when he was writing stuff for the Invisibles. He said that he was suffering from a parasite that was killing him. So he had to write his characters as surviving and getting lots of sex. Thus then it would later happen to him.

 

Now if I had that kind of control over my own reality, I would constantly write characters getting laid and winning the lotto. Ofcourse it only works if your a bald scotsman who works for Marvel and DC. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only thing I do recall is that Morrison mentioned that when he was writing stuff for the Invisibles. He said that he was suffering from a parasite that was killing him. So he had to write his characters as surviving and getting lots of sex. Thus then it would later happen to him.

 

Now if I had that kind of control over my own reality, I would constantly write characters getting laid and winning the lotto. Ofcourse it only works if your a bald scotsman who works for Marvel and DC. :lol:

 

If you fantasize about having lots of sex, and then you masturbate....Voila! You've done it!

Morrison also has a wife....so, you know, his magical attempts to get lots of sex are more likely to work than people without girlfriends....

 

There's always the case to be made for positive thinking. Sending the right signals out into the ether and believing in them strongly. Changes the lot number of your fate.

It's hard to believe in something that strongly though. And, if you're not careful, it becomes an obsession. Also, performing a magical formulae wishing for lots of sex, with no person in mind, is a dangerous idea.

 

Yes, I remember the story. Morrison was dying of a parasite, and he created a magical sigil having to do with his fiction, and he recovered.

I believe it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if he also has any kids. Because then anything magical he does, could be passed down to his kids.. Either that or his kids disown him and think their father is just incredibly weird.. (which is what my kids will one day think or KNOW.) :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...