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JohnMcMahon

Fuckbiscuitshitangels (Warren Ellis)

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What the fuck?! :ohmy:

 

I don't know which is stranger: what she is doing or the fact that people are there watching (and applauding!).

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I always though Diamanda Galas was for people who wanted to pretend they like left field stuff and should be punished for it. Or people who missed the point of Elizabeth Frazer.

 

I prefer

.

 

And of course

who illustrates why people who see ,much merit in La Galas should syphon out their ears with Nitric Acid (or "How Constanteen could have been improved pt 164)

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I always though Diamanda Galas was for people who wanted to pretend they like left field stuff and should be punished for it. Or people who missed the point of Elizabeth Frazer.

I always got the impression she was for slumming opera fans. Don't see the connection with Liz Fraser, though.

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I always though Diamanda Galas was for people who wanted to pretend they like left field stuff and should be punished for it.

 

Funny, I half-thought you might pop-up in this thread with an indignant response for some reason.

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I always though Diamanda Galas was for people who wanted to pretend they like left field stuff and should be punished for it. Or people who missed the point of Elizabeth Frazer.

I always got the impression she was for slumming opera fans. Don't see the connection with Liz Fraser, though.

 

That's clearly because you have missed the point.

 

In other news

 

Warren Ellis' column in SFX Magazine, out this week.

 

I've decided to begin this column by using my powers for good. Anyone who knows me will tell you this is unlike me. But, if you look into the two recommendations I'm making, their creators will owe me money. So it all works out.

 

Matt Fraction and Gabriel Ba's Casanova is purebred gonzo SF, produced by Image Comics in a format I devised for Fell: 16 pages of comics and four or five of commentary material in the back like a DVD extra and sold for $1.99. I wanted people to be able to pick up a real chunk of material for pocket change. Matt took the format, producing probably the densest comic you can buy. Its story of a rebellious master thief and spy jumping through crazed sci-fi parallel universes is an inspired mash-up of Jerry Cornelius, Lupin, Steranko's Nick Fury, Danger : Diabolik and about a dozen other things. It has the glory of the hip fringe of the past and the shock of the new all at once. Casanova is one of the essential comics of 2006.

 

Poor old John Constantine's never quite recovered from that diabolical film adaptation and, although great men and women have struggled mightily in recent years, the sad geezer's looking tired in the comics too. In the '80s and '90s, he was relevant but the 21st century hasn't been kind, and his real-time ageing (rare in comics) has him two steps from the colostomy bag. The new man is David Kohl, the magician currently strutting through Gillen and McKelvie's Phonogram (image comics). Kohl is a phonomancer, a practitioner of the magic of records and songs. His area of the Work relates to Britpop; which, in 2006, sounds about as irrelevant as you can get. But, following an encounter with numinous powers (getting beaten up by a goddess during a girl-friendly music fest) that leaves him with a peculiar, terminal condition, his quest to save his own worthless life leads him on a tour of the British cultural landscape of the last ten or 20 years. Again, it's something of a mash-up, the basic structure recalling Garth Ennis's riotous first Constantine book Dangerous Habits - but the goods are in its sheer bloody audacity. Like Casanova, it's two new creators saying: "no, this is what I want comics to be able to do." Both books are antithetical to pretty much anything else you'll find in a comics shop this month. And that's why you should go and look for them.

 

Brit comics writer Warren Ellis's best know series are Transmetropolitan and Global Frequency. He lives in Southend-on-Sea and drinks a hell of a lot of Red Bull.

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Aside from a few of Delano's stories (particularly some of the weaker, heavy-handed examples), I don't think Constantine was ever especially 'relevant' as anything much more than a vector for some rather good comic stories. Ellis' slightly embarrassing attempts to make him otherwise were one of the weaker aspects of his short run, to my mind.

 

That said though, I can see what he's getting at, and don't entirely disagree with him. While I've generally enjoyed the last half-decade's worth of Hellblazer (albeit with increasing reservations over the last 2 years or so), I'd be hard-pressed to argue that the character or title have any real significance to anyone/anything beyond the immediate readership these days. Back in the early years, it was (at least within the mainstream, DC/Marvel portion of the industry) a genuinely unique, distinctive title which filled a specific void in the cultural landscape. There are simply too many other titles filling that void these days for Hellblazer to have the same significance, and it's not changed sufficiently to retain that distinctiveness/uniqueness in the modern comics world. It's arguable that both Azzarello and Ellis at least tried, but for different reasons, neither came close to succeeding. Whether that's a good, bad or neutral thing, of course, is a matter of individual opinion. Personally, it doesn't bother me much.

 

Sadly, I gave up on Phonogram after the second issue - I downloaded the third part out of curiosity, and reckon I made the right choice. It's perfectly well-executed, and I suspect that both Gillen (possibly) and McKelvie (almost certainly) could well go on to produce some very good work in future, but ultimately, the (thoroughly self-conscious and deliberate, which may or may not be a mitigating factor) pretension was getting right on my wick. I didn't find the story original or compelling, and as someone who absolutely loved many of the bands in question, the pop-commentary stuff all felt too familiar to be really interesting, and it certainly wasn't nearly enough to make up for the uninspired, uninspiring plot. I'd have thought it was absolutely brilliant when I was 17, though.

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ultimately, the (thoroughly self-conscious and deliberate, which may or may not be a mitigating factor) pretension was getting right on my wick.

 

Agreed. I downloaded issue three, though (because the cover was ace) and thought the last three pages or so were fantastic. I just wished they'd been part of comic that was more to my taste.

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the last three pages or so were fantastic. I just wished they'd been part of comic that was more to my taste.

 

They were, too, and that was one of the best comic covers I've seen this year, in both conception and execution. I'll look forward to seeing what else McKelvie works on in the future, 'cos he's already pretty damn good, and there's no reason to believe he won't get a lot better.

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Phonogram's glorified fanfiction, "What if...John Constantine had even heard of Echobelly", which'd be just fine if it ever rose above the level of up-it's-own-arse music commentary. Casanova's a quaility read though, dense stuff but lots of fun.

 

Anyway, if anyone's qualified to speak on what's irrelevant in comics these days, it's Warren 'newuniversal' Ellis.

 

FORCE WORKS (thank god its not NEW Force Works at least) the new team series from Marvel debuts in the summer of 2007 with story by Warren Ellis and art by John Cassaday. Covers for the first size issues are by George Perez (Vu: Rumor is untrue, please read George's comment)

 

What happens when Galactus and Thanos find themselves working together with a common goal to remake the universe itself?

 

Force Works.

 

Dr. Strange

Thor (the real one)

Black Bolt

Adam Warlock

Sentry

Silver surfer

 

led by latest incarnation of the Phoenix....

 

Nathan Summers

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the last three pages or so were fantastic. I just wished they'd been part of comic that was more to my taste.

 

They were, too, and that was one of the best comic covers I've seen this year, in both conception and execution. I'll look forward to seeing what else McKelvie works on in the future, 'cos he's already pretty damn good, and there's no reason to believe he won't get a lot better.

 

Same here. He's not exactly perfect right now - his characters sometimes suffer from dodgy foreshortening and boneless limbs,* as you'd expect from and indie artist - but he shows a shitload of promise.

 

Casanova's a quaility read though, dense stuff but lots of fun.

 

Casanova's one of those things that I'll keep putting off for about five years, then get into it way after everyone else is bored of it and the writer's turned to shit.

 

 

 

 

*example: Look at the last page of issue 3 with Mary-Sue Gillen jumping and marvel at how ace it looks. Then look at panel one of the page immediately before. WHAT THE CHRIST IS HAPPENING TO HIS ARM?

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Aside from a few of Delano's stories (particularly some of the weaker, heavy-handed examples), I don't think Constantine was ever especially 'relevant' as anything much more than a vector for some rather good comic stories. Ellis' slightly embarrassing attempts to make him otherwise were one of the weaker aspects of his short run, to my mind.

Ennis's run had a fair amount of political stuff in it. Most of it was sentiment about things that don't change readily, but there was that story line about the race riot that apparently was based one on that actually happened not long before. I did mostly like Delano's efforts at tackling political issues, even if they often weren't his best issues, but Ennis did the best job of consistently relating Constantine to the body politic. It was only with Jenkins' run that HB was depoliticized, which took a little bit of bite out of the book, IMO at least.

 

I wouldn't have minded seeing Ellis's further efforts at bringing politics back in, but unfortunately he didn't stay with the book....

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Wow! I think I actually agree with everything Mark had to say about Hellblazer (well, except I'd say the majority of Delano's run, instead of a few stories)! It must be one of those days....

 

FORCE WORKS (thank god its not NEW Force Works at least) the new team series from Marvel debuts in the summer of 2007 with story by Warren Ellis and art by John Cassaday. Covers for the first size issues are by George Perez (Vu: Rumor is untrue, please read George's comment)

 

What happens when Galactus and Thanos find themselves working together with a common goal to remake the universe itself?

 

Force Works.

 

Dr. Strange

Thor (the real one)

Black Bolt

Adam Warlock

Sentry

Silver surfer

 

led by latest incarnation of the Phoenix....

 

Nathan Summers

 

Wow! Holy hell! That team sounds pretty amazing! Not too excited about the new Phoenix, but whatever. That team is almost my dream line-up....I'd go with Son of Satan over Sentry...

 

Wasn't Force Works that Avengers spin off that was one of Marvel's worst of a multidue of god-awful titles from the 1990s?

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Poor old John Constantine's never quite recovered from that diabolical film adaptation and, although great men and women have struggled mightily in recent years, the sad geezer's looking tired in the comics too. In the '80s and '90s, he was relevant but the 21st century hasn't been kind, and his real-time ageing (rare in comics) has him two steps from the colostomy bag. The new man is David Kohl, the magician currently strutting through Gillen and McKelvie's Phonogram (image comics).

 

Sorry, I had to come back to this as it's been annoying me, but surely Kohl's already dated by virtue of being a boring twat who keeps going on about music that's more than a decade old ?

 

Here's Garth Ennis' summary of the first 15 or so pages in Phonogram....

 

phono.gif

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Ha! Excellent, John.

 

To be fair to Ellis, he does say

 

His area of the Work relates to Britpop; which, in 2006, sounds about as irrelevant as you can get.

 

But to be fair to you, he doesn't actually admit that Kohl is just as outdated as Constantine even though that's the point of the series. You'd think he would notice that fact when he wrote the following, wouldn't you?

 

But, following an encounter with numinous powers (getting beaten up by a goddess during a girl-friendly music fest) that leaves him with a peculiar, terminal condition, his quest to save his own worthless life leads him on a tour of the British cultural landscape of the last ten or 20 years.

 

And if he did notice it, why didn't he either obfuscate that part or address the conflict with his initial statement?

 

Probably because he was too busy webwanking.

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Probably because he was too busy webwanking.

 

To second-life avatars, which is taking tragedy to new levels.

 

That peculiar condition might seem familiar to anyone who's read the 'In The Red Corner' issue of Hellblazer.

 

...and me, actually, as I appear to be suffering it in this thread.

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Interestingly, Phonogram is not fan-fiction in that sense at all.

It is Fanzine Fiction, Gillen's self-obsession knowingly wrapped up in lots of nostalgic pop references.

 

I shall just observe that anyone who compares it too closely to Hellblazer is merely echoing those who think Greek gods are Superheroes. The psychological process you are undergoing is as follows:

 

"I LOVE SUPERHEROES" -> "All stories are superhero stories with varying degrees of super powers".

 

Sandman ? "Superhero"

Constantine ? "Superhero"

Hercules ? "Superhero"

The Bible ? "Superheo"

 

The biography of Thomas Alva Edison ? "Superhero"

 

Emanuelle ? "Superhero"

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Well, in this instance, any and all Hellblazer comparisons are stemming from Ellis' words up above.

 

I've enjoyed a bale-load of articles Gillen has written about various facets of the PC games industry over the last five years or so and, as a result, had very high hopes for Phonogram, unfortunately the first three issues were kinda rubbish.

 

Kid-With-Knife is totally Chaz too.

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I read (an e-stolen copy of) that recently. It was shite.

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