Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rogan

Stars in yer dust...?

Recommended Posts

Vaughn Helming Gaiman's Stardust

 

Source: Variety

January 16, 2005

 

 

Variety reports that producer-turned-director Matthew Vaughn (Layer Cake) has optioned Neil Gaiman's fantasy novel Stardust, about the adventures of a half-fairy boy, for himself to direct via his production company MARV. Here's how the book is describes:

 

Young Tristan Thorn will do anything to win the cold heart of beautiful Victoria--even bring her the star they watch as it falls from the night sky. But to do so, he must enter the unexplored lands on the other side of the ancient barrier that borders their tiny village. And beyond the safety of Wall, strange things can happen to a determined lad chasing his heart's desire into a magical world of wonders and perils--where anything that can be imagined can be found.

 

Vaughn is also in talks with Trainspotting writer John Hodge to come aboard his remake of 1960s TV series The Man From U.N.C.L.E. for Warner Bros.

 

"I've always wanted to make a spy movie, and our idea is like nothing you've ever seen before," Vaughn told the trade. "The name is the only thing that's staying from the original show. The studio is giving us a lot of freedom to break the rules."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently so. Could be good...we'll see. It'll have to be pretty visually stunning to beat the lovely Vess art of the original, though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Apparently so. Could be good...we'll see. It'll have to be pretty visually stunning to beat the lovely Vess art of the original, though...

 

indeed! some of the best stuff Vess ever did, in my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never saw the Vess art. I only read the paperback...

 

I have to wonder if they'll have the muted ending of the book, though, with the witch wandering off back to her sisters despite all the death and destruction she's wrought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a real shame the Vess-illustrated version of Stardust isn't more widely available. I've never read the paperback version, but I seriously doubt it'd have anything like the impact or beauty of the original version without the art. It's a nice enough little story, but the illustrations are what really make it something special, and I mean no disrespect to Gaiman when I say that. It was written with illustration in mind, and to reprint it without said art seems a little pointless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's a real shame the Vess-illustrated version of Stardust isn't more widely available. I've never read the paperback version, but I seriously doubt it'd have anything like the impact or beauty of the original version without the art. It's a nice enough little story, but the illustrations are what really make it something special, and I mean no disrespect to Gaiman when I say that. It was written with illustration in mind, and to reprint it without said art seems a little pointless.

 

I fully agree. the art makes it special, though I do like the story. but indeed, it was intended as an illustrated story, so there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's a real shame the Vess-illustrated version of Stardust isn't more widely available. I've never read the paperback version, but I seriously doubt it'd have anything like the impact or beauty of the original version without the art. It's a nice enough little story, but the illustrations are what really make it something special, and I mean no disrespect to Gaiman when I say that. It was written with illustration in mind, and to reprint it without said art seems a little pointless.

 

I fully agree. the art makes it special, though I do like the story. but indeed, it was intended as an illustrated story, so there.

 

 

me three - James, saying you read the plain text version is like you haven't read it at all...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"I've always wanted to make a spy movie, and our idea is like nothing you've ever seen before," Vaughn told the trade. "The name is the only thing that's staying from the original show. The studio is giving us a lot of freedom to break the rules..."

 

"... and after WB is done with us, it'll just be another generic piece of spy crap."

 

:rolleyes:

 

I give him an A for their enthusiasm, but I could do without the worn-out "I'm going to take the world by storm with my revolutionary ideas' speach. You're not, Vaughn; you'll just make another boring porcorn action movie at the end of the day.

 

...

 

Apologies for my pessimism, but this has been a depressing week for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Roger Avary and Neil Gaiman have joined forces with Steve Bing and Robert Zemeckis to bring the oldest written English language myth, Beowulf, to the big screen through the magic of performance capture. Zemeckis will direct from the screenplay by Avary and Gaiman. The project will be financed by Shangri-La Entertainment, which is currently in discussions with Sony Pictures Entertainment to distribute all of its feature films. The film will be produced by Robert Zemeckis, Steve Starkey and Jack Rapke. Martin Shafer will serve as executive producer along with Avary and Gaiman.

 

Zemeckis is the acclaimed Academy Award®-winning director of Forrest Gump as well as such major hit films as Castaway, What Lies Beneath, Contact, the Back to the Future trilogy, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Romancing the Stone and Death Becomes Her.

 

Avary, who is an actual Viking descendant, won an Academy Award for his collaboration with Quentin Tarantino on Pulp Fiction, and is the writer/director of such acclaimed films as Killing Zoe and The Rules of Attraction. Avary is currently finishing the screenplay adaptation of the hit Konami videogame, Silent Hill, for Producer Samuel Hadida and Tristar Pictures.

 

Gaiman is the Hugo and Nebula-Award winning author of such novels as American Gods and Coraline, and is best known as the creator of DC Comics' legendary Sandman. He wrote the English Language Script for the Miyazaki film Princess Mononoke. His first feature, MirrorMask, directed by Dave McKean, premieres at the Sundance Film Festival. His short film A Short Film About John Bolton was just released on DVD. Projects in development based on work by Gaiman include Coraline, which Henry Selick is writing and directing, and Stardust, with director Matthew Vaughn. Gaiman is writing and will be directing Death and Me, based on his DC Comics graphic novel Death: The High Cost of Living for New Line Cinema."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vaughn is also in talks with Trainspotting writer John Hodge to come aboard his remake of 1960s TV series The Man From U.N.C.L.E. for Warner Bros.

 

"I've always wanted to make a spy movie, and our idea is like nothing you've ever seen before," Vaughn told the trade. "The name is the only thing that's staying from the original show. The studio is giving us a lot of freedom to break the rules."

 

if the movie will be nothing like the series, why bother? I know I'll be asking this question until the day I die ...

 

I wonder if the Stardust movie will be animated or if they'll use actors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...