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Vagabond

Top 5 favorite long comics runs by a writer or artist

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Filling in them speech balloons.

1). Alan Moore- Swamp Thing (Straight up!)

 

2). Jamie Delano- Hellblazer (I can't really count so...)

3). Neil Gaiman- Sandman (I know, I know, It feels like listing mozart in your top 5 music choices High fidelity style, where strangely Swamp Thing doesn't.)

4). Bendis-Daredevil (Which might have alot to do with Alex Maleev)

5) Jim Kreuger/Alex Ross- Earth X trilogy (Hell even their own mothers don't defend this work as much as I do, damp editorised ending withstanding.)

 

Morrison on Animal Man would be stretching it, and the Invisibles as as whole, especially Volume 3, is a mess.

Shit I forgot Doom Patrol!

 

Ennis on Punisher but I need a definitive reread before then.

 

I'm not really artist savy.

But so far Alex Maleev-Daredevil.

And I'll ruminate on the others.

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Hmmmm....all vertigo type stuff...

You're obviously a more sophisticated reader than those of us who are naming stuff with guys in tights hitting each other, Lou.

:hattip:

 

:laugh: heh...I honestly couldn't think of any big runs I enjoyed from a great creative team from the spandex universe. Much of that type of stuff that I read hasn't gone 40 issues. Maybe the first 60 issues or so of Ultimate Spiderman by Brian Bendis and Mark Bagley? I'd like to throw Ultimates in there too but that didn't go 40 issues. Aha! I've got it! Stormwatch by Warren Ellis. That should get an honorable mention.

 

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Words

2. Matt Wagner-Sandman Mystery Theatre

 

That's a good one there at #2, which no one had mentioned.

 

I somehow forgot Alan Moore's Promethea (32 issues) and Denny O'Neil's The Question (36 issues) which makes my "should be on a list, but doesn't quite meet the criteria" alternate list.

Right on my commie brother right on!

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1. Denny O'Neil-Detective Comics

 

 

Nowhere near enough issues to qualify - he only did 24 issues of 'Tec in total, spread over about 8-9 years. If you add his Batman work as well, you get just over 50 largely non-consecutive comics. Great work, for the most part, but I think you're stretching the definition of "long comics runs" beyond breaking point.

Damn you Mark for pointing out my weak ass attempt at slipping that one by. Okay so then since Mark has completely blown my attempt at fraud wide the fuck open I submit Alan Grant's run on Detective in that spot. Suck on that! :tongue:

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umm...I think that Alan Grant's run on Detective Comics only comes to 26 issues.

Maybe if you include his later run on Batman it would add up to over 40 issues.

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But then you'd have to include his meh-inducing Shadow of the Bat.

 

Since Alan's run on Detective is the very quintessence of comics awesomeness, it simply must qualify by itself.

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I really liked his run on Batman too.

But, yeah, if this conclusion leads inevitably to also including Shadow of the Bat, we must disqualify it.

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Grant was very annoyed at being given Shadow Of The Bat instead of getting to write the anniversary issue of Detective. Does it show?

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Think you've got that slightly confused, dogpoet - Grant did get to write a story for the anniversary issue of 'Tec. Both Grant/Breyfogle and the then-current Batman team, Wolfman/Aparo, did reworked modern versions of the first-ever Batman story, from Detective #27, along with a reprint of yet another version done back in the '60s. It's not a bad little anniversary celebration, all told - some nice bonus pin-ups too, as I recall.

 

Was there some other project which Grant didn't get to be a part of? I'm quite certain you didn't just completely make up that particular trivia nugget*, so unless his problem was solely that he didn't get to write the whole issue himself (in which case, fuck him) I'm curious what you were thinking of.

 

 

*God, that sounds horribly sarcastic, doesn't it? It's not meant to, honestly.

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1. Garth Ennis - Preacher/Hellblazer/The Boys

2. Rob Kirkman - Walking Dead

3. Warren Ellis - Transmetropolitan/Global Frequency/Hellblazer/Stormwatch/Authority

4. Frank Miller - SIN CITY/The DARK KNIGHT RETURNS/Batman: Year One

5. Brian Wood - DMZ and DEMO

 

1. Tim Bradstreet - Hellblazer covers/Punisher covers/Criminal Macabre covers

2. Frank Quitely - All Star Superman/WE3/X-Men

3. Eduardo Risso - 100 Bullets

4. Tony Moore - Exterminators/Walking Dead

5. Alex Ross - Kingdom Come/covers

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St Finn having already stretched the definition of "long comics run" far beyond conventional understanding, slinker decides to abandon it entirely. Nicely done!

 

:laugh:

 

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Since Slinker's post I wish to revise somewhat!

 

Best Long time writer.

1). Kevin Smith Bullseye Target

2). John Smith Hellblazer

3). Alan Moore Big Numbers

4). Warren Ellis Desolation Jones

5). Grant Morrison The Authority

 

Artists

1). Bill Sinke...er...wietz Big Numbers

2). Okay the jokes old!

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Oops. Shouldn't post when I'm stoned. Heh. I'll give it more thought later, but I can still use some of what I posted, right?

 

bong%20and%20bongs.jpg

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Think you've got that slightly confused, dogpoet - Grant did get to write a story for the anniversary issue of 'Tec. Both Grant/Breyfogle and the then-current Batman team, Wolfman/Aparo, did reworked modern versions of the first-ever Batman story, from Detective #27, along with a reprint of yet another version done back in the '60s. It's not a bad little anniversary celebration, all told - some nice bonus pin-ups too, as I recall.

 

Was there some other project which Grant didn't get to be a part of? I'm quite certain you didn't just completely make up that particular trivia nugget*, so unless his problem was solely that he didn't get to write the whole issue himself (in which case, fuck him) I'm curious what you were thinking of.

 

 

*God, that sounds horribly sarcastic, doesn't it? It's not meant to, honestly.

I think it might have been #500 of Batman itself he was on about. I've seen an interview where he was saying that they'd given that (if it wasn't Detective Comics, I can't imagine what else it would have been) to somebody else and fobbed him off with Shadow Of The Bat, which launched at the same time. His greiviance was that this was the best selling batman comic for twenty odd years, and he'd have liked some of that royalty action, so it obviously wasn't splitting the credit with another creative that bothers him. Who did write that one, anyway? Denny O'Neill?

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I think it might have been #500 of Batman itself he was on about. I've seen an interview where he was saying that they'd given that (if it wasn't Detective Comics, I can't imagine what else it would have been) to somebody else and fobbed him off with Shadow Of The Bat, which launched at the same time. His greiviance was that this was the best selling batman comic for twenty odd years, and he'd have liked some of that royalty action, so it obviously wasn't splitting the credit with another creative that bothers him. Who did write that one, anyway? Denny O'Neill?

 

Now you mention it, that story definitely rings a bell. Give me a couple of minutes, I'll see if I can dig up the relevant interview.

 

EDIT: Yep, here it is.

 

You're right, it was Batman #500, although Grant doesn't seem especially bitter about the whole thing. Here's the relevant section:

 

Alan Grant: In fact when Denny, and I don’t know if Norm remembers this but it was at one of the Batman meets that we had, eventually said he wanted us to leave the Batman monthly and start our own title, Shadow Of The Bat, which in fact was a great honour because very few people get that kind of opportunity, I argued against it. Do you remember that Norm?

Norm Breyfogle: Yes I do and I didn’t really understand what we were passing up. I didn’t realize that the 500th issue would do as well as it did. [laughter]

AG: Alright, hey don’t make me too mercenary. [laughter] But I had already figured out that Batman 500 was coming up and I thought, well we’ve done it so far so we should be on the 500th because there was going to be big royalties there. I guess it was just a dream.

NB: I vaguely remember you mentioned that to me at a Batman summit conference and I guess I should have listened more closely. What would Denny have done if we’d said, “No we don’t want to, we want to stay on Batman.” Would we have stayed on Batman?

AG: No, I don’t think so. I think Denny would have gone with Doug Moench and Jim Aparo on Batman anyway because Jim was more of a traditional artist than you. Therefore he’d have preferred Jim drawing Batman rather than a new title.

NB: In other words Denny offering us the choice was just a courtesy.

AG: Oh yeah, it was a genuine courtesy because they were creating a new Batman comic. Denny was shocked when I said I’d rather stay on Batman and he was shocked because very few people get asked to create a new Batman comic.

NB: Shadow Of The Bat did do well, it’s just that the 500th issue of Batman did so much better than I expected. Did it do better than you expected, Alan? It sure surprised me. Mike Manley had just been getting into comics and it was his first Batman job and he got a nice little nest egg from that.

AG: Four and a half million copies it sold. That’s good numbers.

DB: Well I bought two of them. [laughter]

AG: That’s why I wanted to stay on it. [laughter]

NB: But we wouldn’t have been able to. In other words Denny offered us the choice didn’t he, but we weren’t given a choice because he would have taken us off the book anyway.

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Thanks. That's an interesting piece, but I think the interview where I first saw it mentioned (just with Alan Grant, a lengthier and more general thing about the length of his career) he did sound a bit more narked about it. Mind you, if I'd had some of the shitty turns of fortune that seem to have dogged Grant's comics career in the 'States, I'd be well narked as well.

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With the new criteria, I now nominate J.M. DeMatteis' Dr. Fate (25 issues, plus an annual).

 

Also, for actual long runs, no one has mentioned John Ostrander's Suicide Squad, so that gets an honourable mention on my list.

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Oh come on Alan Grant's run on Detective was 39 issues long Alan Grant CBDB listing I think we can all agree that fits the criteria, unless we are just trying to be severely anal retentive. Besides all that he did an annual for Detective so therefore he did 40 issues of Detective, so suck on that! :tongue:

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1. Denny O'Neil-Detective Comics

 

 

Nowhere near enough issues to qualify - he only did 24 issues of 'Tec in total, spread over about 8-9 years. If you add his Batman work as well, you get just over 50 largely non-consecutive comics. Great work, for the most part, but I think you're stretching the definition of "long comics runs" beyond breaking point.

Actually Mark he did thirty but you're right still not enough to qualify. However I reiterate my previous point that Alan Grant's 39 issues of Det should count.

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He did? Oops, I must have miscounted. Thanks.

 

It wasn't so much the number of issues as the fact that they were largely non-consecutive which really stands out to me, though - he was a regular contributor to the book, but it really wasn't a "run" on the title in the way which the term generally connotes to a modern reader. On the other hand, Grant/Breyfogle's 'Tec run (which I never mentioned, by the way - 'twas only O'Neill I was calling you out on), completely qualifies for me, even if they didn't quite make it to the arbitrarily-decided 40-issue mark.

 

Anyway, here's my list, mostly off-the-top-of-my-head. Subject to possible amendment, largely because there's a nagging voice in the back of my head insisting that I've forgotten about something really, really obvious.

 

Artists:

Jack Kirby, Fantastic Four

Steve Ditko, Amazing Spider-Man (not quite a full forty issues, even including Annuals, but see above)

Dave Sim, Cerebus

Eduardo Risso, 100 Bullets

Katsuhiro Otomo, Akira

 

 

Writers:

Stan Lee, Amazing Spider-Man

Jack Kirby, Fourth World Saga

Dave Sim, Cerebus

Grant Morrison, The Invisibles

Alan Moore, Swamp Thing

 

 

Honourable mentions go to Breyfogle's various Batman runs (and Grant's Detective Comics), Miller's Daredevil, Ennis/McCrea's Hitman, Gaiman's Sandman, Morrison's Doom Patrol, Eisner's Spirit, Goscinny/Udzero's Asterix, Herge's Tintin, Alan Grant's Judge Dredd, and Jeff Smith's Bone. And others.

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Has nobody else mentioned Moore's Swamp Thing all thread?

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Is Bone much better in color?

 

I liked the art in the omnibus, but I certainly wouldn't put it ahead of the Spirit.

 

Yeah I put Swamp Thing at #3.

 

Mark's the first person to name someone I've never heard. Didn't expect the Japanese to arrive so quickly.

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