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JohnMcMahon

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Was able to score this today. Apparently my local comic shop owner was instructed by Diamond to destroy all of these. Yeah, right.

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Like the writer of that article I'm really surprised that the creator actually writes in the words that the editor will later (attempt) to delete before going to print. I find that a bit odd.

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Like the writer of that article I'm really surprised that the creator actually writes in the words that the editor will later (attempt) to delete before going to print. I find that a bit odd.

 

That's Miller for you. I thought he would just do the symbols like *&^%$. Like most non adult comics do.

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Well, he is the goddamn Frank Miller, young wolvy.

 

I actually heard that he's prone to announce that whenever visiting DC offices.

Probably bogus, but I prefer to live in a world where that is true.

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Well, he is the goddamn Frank Miller, young wolvy.

 

I actually heard that he's prone to announce that whenever visiting DC offices.

Probably bogus, but I prefer to live in a world where that is true.

 

 

What are you, dense?

Are you retarded or something?

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Like the writer of that article I'm really surprised that the creator actually writes in the words that the editor will later (attempt) to delete before going to print. I find that a bit odd.

Exactly. Also, if swear words are so inappropriate for this comic's readership, why even imply them?

 

Americans: if you read the uncensored dialogue out loud, does it sound natural? It reads a bit stilted to me.

 

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dialogue...reads a bit stilted to me.

 

 

I see that this is your first encounter with the works of Frank Miller. Congratulations - a wonderful voyage of discovery awaits you.

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Americans: if you read the uncensored dialogue out loud, does it sound natural? It reads a bit stilted to me.

 

Uh... yeah, even more embaressed than usual to admit to being American, but I would have to say yes. Most unfortunately. Of course it depends on where in America, but honestly you'd be surprised what sort of uninspired crap you can hear on the bus.

 

To get back to your question though, the only bit that seems a tad sticky to me is "Sweet piece in sweet slices... tasty sliced booty", mostly because of the partial alliteration. The kind of idiots who generally tend to speak this way aren't usually much for tongue twisters. In any case, it might come across better with a more explicit suggestion of accent. For example, in my neck of the woods "Little Jailbait [over-used word]'s making us look bad... we cut her come on" would likely be said something like this:

 

Little Jailbait [over-used word]' s'makin'us look bad. We cut'er. Cm'on.

 

And yes, s'makin'us would be all one word, we are incredibly lazy over here.

 

Yeah, I hate it too. Sometimes my fiancee and I jokingly tell people that we live in 'Merka.

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Mate, you ought to go to Australia,in one afternoon you will hear all of that and more.

 

Or as they say

 

Maa' ya awwta g' t' Ozee, 'n one arvo' u'll 'ear altha' 'n mor.

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dialogue...reads a bit stilted to me.

 

 

I see that this is your first encounter with the works of Frank Miller. Congratulations - a wonderful voyage of discovery awaits you.

This is true on so many levels.

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It sounds like somebody from Kentucky trying to swear and be jive at the same time. Frank Miller has never really been good at dialogue even during his glory days on Daredevil.

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Maa' ya awwta g' t' Ozee, 'n one arvo' u'll 'ear altha' 'n mor.

 

Wow, that's really quite something. Most of that is fairly understandable to me, but I must admit that I would have no clue what “arvo’” meant without the context. Still, I find that much more pleasing than ill-spoken American BS.

 

To be fair though, it may simply be a function of familiarity vs. the ‘exotic’. For example, a good friend of mine had a conversation about accents with a pen-pal of hers from Sheffield. The English woman had a tendency to wrinkle her nose at the cockney accent, which my friend finds quite enjoyable, while the Sheffield girl praised the southern accent as her favorite American accent, one that is generally not too popular state-side.

 

Personally, I do enjoy the old fashioned upper class Southern accent (see Gone with the Wind or Val Kilmer’s Doc Holiday), but sadly since the American Civil War put a bit of a ‘hitch’ in the Southern economic ‘gettalong’, that one is none too common these days. The Carolinas can come close sometimes, but it’s just not the same.

 

Honestly though, when it comes to accents or even culture for that matter, I must say I feel a bit like a guest at a pot-luck who has brought the same old potato salad that everyone is sick to death of. That is to say that so many other countries have been so flooded with American film , TV, embarrassingly bad foreign policy, and the whole Coca Colanization thing, that it seems in addition to annoying the hell out of everyone there is also nothing particularly interesting, mysterious, or exotic left over here. Well, other than Native Americans that is, but they are arguably part their own country really. I must say my fiancée, who is a quarter Native, was quite the hit in Germany.

 

Oh dear, I do seem to be griping overly much. I’d better quit that or I may find a lynch mob in my back yard. My fellow Americans: Sorry. Please don’t shoot the simple-minded, nation-groupie girl. She knows not what she does. :wink:

 

Right, on to praise...

 

Speaking of accents, I have always been quite fond of anything Garth Ennis has written which includes any sort of variety of English, Scottish, Irish, and/or Welsh characters, because he writes them in such a way that I can ‘hear’ a difference in the accents being used. I have not as of yet run across any other writers with quite this particular talent, but as an ignorant Yank, I must ask if they are actually accurate?

 

Also, I have noticed that when one reads material to one’s self, the easiest pattern to fall into is to read everything with one’s own accent ringing away in one’s head. I do try to avoid this whenever the character is not American, or even obviously not a Pacific Northwesterner. For example I do not picture Jesse Custer with my own accent. However, being that America is rather over-sized and quite difficult to get out of if one does not have any sort of noteworthy financial means, I am afraid to say that I have little first hand experience of many accents. So here is my question: What would John Constantine actually sound like? I mean, I have a general notion of what a Liverpool accent sounds like, and I have noticed that London has a few different accents floating about (had a co-worker from the Middlesex area once, and was actually a bit disappointed to find that his accent was mostly noticeable in vocabulary choices rather than pronunciation, although he did have an ingenious and stereotypically English method of cleaning microwaves), but what might a Liverpudlian who has been mostly living in London for a few decades sound like? Any films or actors I could reference?

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Personally, I do enjoy the old fashioned upper class Southern accent (see Gone with the Wind or Val Kilmer’s Doc Holiday), but sadly since the American Civil War put a bit of a ‘hitch’ in the Southern economic ‘gettalong’, that one is none too common these days. The Carolinas can come close sometimes, but it’s just not the same.

 

My South Carolinian grandparents have very nice accents, although they're on the lower-middle-class end of the spectrum so they don't quite have that Southern-gentility ring to them. Whenever I'm visiting them or telling stories about them I tend to slip back into a Southern way of speaking, which my friends think is hilarious since I don't really notice. Vocabulary choice is very different, as well as pronunciation--people they know from church are "church folks," the next town is "out yonder," our Scottish ancestors are "kinfolk."

 

(One of my favorite aspects of the backwoods-Kentucky accent: a "well" is the aquatic animal; a "whale" is what you draw water from.)

 

( ...he did have an ingenious and stereotypically English method of cleaning microwaves)

 

What on earth could this possibly be?

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Vocabulary choice is very different, as well as pronunciation--people they know from church are "church folks," the next town is "out yonder," our Scottish ancestors are "kinfolk."

 

Yes, I forgot about that. All opinions of the southern pronunciation aside, I am a huge fan of their turns of phrase. They are probably the most colourful ones I have heard anywhere in the states. I had a boyfriend a few years back who was from Georgia and later moved to Pennsylvania. He actually had a relative called Gra’ma Dixie. Anyway, he used to say things like ‘fixing to cut a path’ and ‘all hat and no cattle’, which stuck me as rather expressive. Probably my favorite though would have to be his reaction to being asked to do something when he was busy with two or three things already. He would fix you with this look and say very sarcastically “Why, sure. You stick a broom up my ass and I can sweep the floor too.” Always left me in stitches.

 

( ...he did have an ingenious and stereotypically English method of cleaning microwaves)

 

What on earth could this possibly be?

 

It’s very simple actually. You put a cup of water in the microwave and boil it. It steams the inside, which makes it much easier to wipe clean. The reason I say it was stereotypically English is that it was practical, efficient, and usually ended in tea. After all, what else do you do with a hot cup of water? See? Even the byproduct of the process makes itself useful.

 

Now if they’d just hung on to the natural resources over here in America, they’d likely have taken over the world. :wink:

 

 

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