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JasonT

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I was always puzzled that they insisted Morrison wrote a slightly tiresome "adult" Max FF series, rather than just letting him take over the main title for a story or two. Who was doing it back then, Claremont and Larocca? That was hardly a stand out run...

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Yeah, I'm pretty sure it was Claremont and Larocca at the time. Of course, Mark Waid took over the book after Claremont, and I am certainly not going to complain about getting one of the truly perfect iterations of FF.

Maybe Morrison wasn't interested in writing anything other than a mini-series, due to his commitment to writing X-Men. Besides which, while it couldn't have ended up any worse than the Claremont run, if Morrison was going to do "dark 'n' gritty" FF, instead of Imaginauts, it really wasn't a great loss.

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Well yeah, but at that point Morrison was obviously rather fed up of the whole dark'n'gritty thang, so that might have been imposed on 1234 by editorial in order to Max it up a bit, rather than being something he actually wanted to do with the FF, and it's not inconceivable that this is the reason that one wasn't up to the standard of his X men run and Marvel Boy.

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20 hours ago, Christian said:

Man, I can't imagine anyone not loving this story from Simonson's run....It was what Grant Morrison on FF should have been like, instead of the middling and dull Fantastic Four: 1,2,3,4.

Fantastic Four (1961 1st Series) 352

 

Is that the issue where Richards and Doom are skipping through time, and there's a counter letting you know which panels to read sequentially?  I did dig the hell out of that issue, simply for Simonson's fantastic storytelling gimmick.  Simonson probably came the closest to making me care about the FF, now that I think about it, because I liked his "Acts of Vengeance" 3-part tie-in arc as well.  And that "New FF" story with Wolverine, Spider-Man, Hulk, and Ghost Rider was flat-out brilliant.

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Grant Morrison's Animal Man run.  So I'm enjoying it, I'm almost done with it and really enjoying how he basically took the idea of him being a super hero and slowly introduced new takes on the concept. Specially the hints of things that he laid down in the first trade being explained better in the latter trades. 

 

If I get some more cash, I'll probably check out his Doom Patrol stuff too. 

 

 

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For Christmas I got the "Uber Alles Edition" of Stray Bullets, a massive paperback which collects the entire original Stray Bullets by David Lapham series.

I've read the first few issues of Stray Bullets a few years back as well as the sequel mini-series Killers, but this was the first time binging the entirety of the original series. And it was very much worth the hours spent going through all 1000+ pages.

A damn fine read. Loved how each issue can work stand-alone but still contributes to an overarching story.

(the last issue did feel a bit anti-climatic to me as far as an ending goes, I wonder how it felt to people who had waited for nearly ten years for Lapham to finish it?)

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That is a most excellent cover, makes me want to fire up the intro from the Monkees on Youtube.

In fact, I just did, 49 seconds very well spent.

Anyway, I'm rereading the Age Of Apocalypse crossover at the moment - it's very, very stupid and dumb but also exactly what I want from a big superhero event.

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On 1/24/2018 at 3:01 AM, JohnMcMahon said:

That is a most excellent cover, makes me want to fire up the intro from the Monkees on Youtube.

In fact, I just did, 49 seconds very well spent.

Anyway, I'm rereading the Age Of Apocalypse crossover at the moment - it's very, very stupid and dumb but also exactly what I want from a big superhero event.

Age of Apocalypse is brilliant, it's like this sprawling apex of comic book crossovers, where things still fit together really damn well and each series is engaging on its own terms while still being part of a whole.  Compared to detritus like Secret Invasion and Secret Empire, AoA is rad.  It may be depressing as fuck, but it's still fun to read at the same time.  That Generation Next tie-in remains one of my favorite superhero comic endings just due to how damn bleak it was.

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Yes, there's a lot to commend Age of Apocalypse. It's certainly in the top two or three Marvel cross-overs (nothing is going to beat Inferno, for mine). Generation Next was excellent, and Warren Ellis contributed the X-Calibre tie-in. At the very least, it had those two series going for it, but the whole thing tied together quite well. Weapon X was probably the only weak link in the entire event, and it wasn't outright terrible.

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It was certainly a lot better than that Onslaught foolishness a year or two later...

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I think I bought the Legion collection.

How does this work? What's the one that Mike Carey wrote?

Hmm, maybe I didn't buy it. Unless I sent it to the wrong address. I looked at it in the shop and the later art is distressing.

Meanwhile, I found some bags of old comics that I must have brought from my Dad's last year.

 

The Lost (Andreyko, Showman, Geldhof) 

Squalor (Petrucha)

Empty Love Stories #1 (Steve Darnall, various artists) which reminds me to recommend Twisted Romance anthology, a weekly burst of fun)

 

And... wait for it ... Ethan Van Sciver's Cyberfrog !
How times have changed.

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If you're a fan of James Bond or political comics, do yourself a favour and make sure to read James Bond: The Body, written by Ales Kot. The second issue just shipped this week, and it's a masterpiece. Kot works his political magic on the character of James Bond. This one is going to be showing up on my list of best single-issue stories of the year.

I'm not a fan of the James Bond character, so I enjoy this sort of deconstruction of the character by Kot. However, I did greatly enjoy the Ellis run on Bond, because it was Ellis. Well, The Body is topping what I enjoyed about Ellis' run.

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The current-era James Bond comics have generally been solid stuff. I'd like to see an arc by Brubaker and, say, Michael Lark, or someone else who does traditional newspaper-strip artwork.

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Read the first Witch Doctor trade, 's pretty good, plenty of potential - Penny Dreadful (ugh, awful name) in particular is a character I want to learn more about.  Here she is anaesthetising someone for the good doctor -

2512967-pen.jpg

There's some fun background stuff at the end, old character sketches and the like which reveal that she was original decked out in a Suicide Girls-esque nun outfit which would've ruined both the character and comic as a whole so good shout going for the creepy hoody look instead.

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The artist probably decided that chavs are scarier than goths during the designs, John.

:wink2:

Just gone through a collection of the Wolfman/Colan Curse Of Dracula comic from '98. A fun read, but sadly the obvious sequel hook in the ending is now unlikely to ever be used.

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Loved Dr Star this week. Lemire's Black Hammer is killing it. Dr Frankenstein was good too.

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Does anyone have any information about Anne Nocenti's The Seeds comic, which was scheduled as the fourth of the Berger Books imprint at Dark Horse?

Dark Horse originally had it scheduled for March 28th release. However, new listings for Dark Horse comics in March 2018 do not list the book. Also, there do not seem to be any advance orders for the comic listed on any internet comic book retailer sites, when the comic publishers usually solicit the new comics two months ahead of shipping.

Has the book been indefinitely delayed?

That's a shame, as it seemed like the most interesting book coming from the Berger Books imprint.

Hungry Ghosts is decent, but nothing that's setting the comic world on fire (a mature readers version of House of Mystery, basically, although with some multi-cultural flair). The new Incognegro series looks promising, but it's not going to be anything more than that the original book accomplished, just set in a different time-period. I'd rather read James Baldwin. Mata Hari I can't say I have any interest.

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I was quite surprised to see that they've sharecropped mata hari since she's a real person with a history that's fairly well documented. A simple bio comic is fair enough, but isn't this being talked about as an ongoing? It'll get quite dull after the French shoot her...

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he he

No, it's just a five-part mini-series.

They could always do Afterlife with Mata Hari, if they really did want to continue the story. Or, they could turn it in to a dystopian sci-fi story for the next arc, when Mata Hari gets cloned in the Cyberpunk far future.

All of the Berger Books line that have been announced are minis. Hungry Ghosts is four issues. Incognegro is also five issues. The Seeds was supposed to be, I think, a six-part series.

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Got you. That makes a lot more sense.

 

I've just gone through the whole of Stars and STRIPE on another historical note. A fun read.

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It's a KNOWN FACT that the US comics "market" hates anthology comics.

So I wish to draw your attention to Twisted Romance.
A four issue, weekly series from Alex De Campi (Smoke, No Mercy, Grindhouse) and friends.

Some really nice little stories on the theme of romance in its widest sense, and a healthy variety of  styles.

Outsider indie of Sarah Horrocks, cool contemporary cartoonery of Kate Skelly and Sarah Winifred Searle, a retro space age update of Tom & Jerry from Margaret Trauth.
And Little Nemo meets Aubrey Beardsley in a Fairy Tale from  De Campi and Trungles.

The highlight for me is Invincible Heart by De Campi and Carla Speed McNeil.
Space Pirates ! Planets of Doom! Seduction! all beautifully drawn in black and white.


 

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Negative Burn was about the only time that an American comic publisher got an anthology comic right, and it lasted a decent amount of issues.

Some might argue Dark Horse Presents, which was quite long-running and published a number of high-quality series in its pages, but I preferred the plurality of genres from Negative Burn. DHP would often seem to have too much filler in between the stand-out stories, whereas a good majority of Negative Burn's short fiction was worth reading.

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