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JasonT

Other comics we read recently

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The artist probably decided that chavs are scarier than goths during the designs, John.

:wink2:

Just gone through a collection of the Wolfman/Colan Curse Of Dracula comic from '98. A fun read, but sadly the obvious sequel hook in the ending is now unlikely to ever be used.

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Loved Dr Star this week. Lemire's Black Hammer is killing it. Dr Frankenstein was good too.

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Does anyone have any information about Anne Nocenti's The Seeds comic, which was scheduled as the fourth of the Berger Books imprint at Dark Horse?

Dark Horse originally had it scheduled for March 28th release. However, new listings for Dark Horse comics in March 2018 do not list the book. Also, there do not seem to be any advance orders for the comic listed on any internet comic book retailer sites, when the comic publishers usually solicit the new comics two months ahead of shipping.

Has the book been indefinitely delayed?

That's a shame, as it seemed like the most interesting book coming from the Berger Books imprint.

Hungry Ghosts is decent, but nothing that's setting the comic world on fire (a mature readers version of House of Mystery, basically, although with some multi-cultural flair). The new Incognegro series looks promising, but it's not going to be anything more than that the original book accomplished, just set in a different time-period. I'd rather read James Baldwin. Mata Hari I can't say I have any interest.

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I was quite surprised to see that they've sharecropped mata hari since she's a real person with a history that's fairly well documented. A simple bio comic is fair enough, but isn't this being talked about as an ongoing? It'll get quite dull after the French shoot her...

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he he

No, it's just a five-part mini-series.

They could always do Afterlife with Mata Hari, if they really did want to continue the story. Or, they could turn it in to a dystopian sci-fi story for the next arc, when Mata Hari gets cloned in the Cyberpunk far future.

All of the Berger Books line that have been announced are minis. Hungry Ghosts is four issues. Incognegro is also five issues. The Seeds was supposed to be, I think, a six-part series.

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Got you. That makes a lot more sense.

 

I've just gone through the whole of Stars and STRIPE on another historical note. A fun read.

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It's a KNOWN FACT that the US comics "market" hates anthology comics.

So I wish to draw your attention to Twisted Romance.
A four issue, weekly series from Alex De Campi (Smoke, No Mercy, Grindhouse) and friends.

Some really nice little stories on the theme of romance in its widest sense, and a healthy variety of  styles.

Outsider indie of Sarah Horrocks, cool contemporary cartoonery of Kate Skelly and Sarah Winifred Searle, a retro space age update of Tom & Jerry from Margaret Trauth.
And Little Nemo meets Aubrey Beardsley in a Fairy Tale from  De Campi and Trungles.

The highlight for me is Invincible Heart by De Campi and Carla Speed McNeil.
Space Pirates ! Planets of Doom! Seduction! all beautifully drawn in black and white.


 

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Negative Burn was about the only time that an American comic publisher got an anthology comic right, and it lasted a decent amount of issues.

Some might argue Dark Horse Presents, which was quite long-running and published a number of high-quality series in its pages, but I preferred the plurality of genres from Negative Burn. DHP would often seem to have too much filler in between the stand-out stories, whereas a good majority of Negative Burn's short fiction was worth reading.

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Caliber Presents had some very good stuff in it as well.

Does the US version of Deadline count?

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No.

But I'm not really here to quibble that opening line. Rather to commend Twisted Romance.

 

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A healthy attitude.

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Cheval Noir shouldn't count, since it's Dark Horse Comics reprinting non-United States comic creator's work for American audiences (plus, David Lynch showed up in there sometimes too). It's one of the most amazing comic book series ever published, and I'm still in awe of its magnificence, no doubt.

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3 hours ago, A. Heathen said:

No.

But I'm not really here to quibble that opening line. Rather to commend Twisted Romance.

 

 

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Read the first issue of Image's INFIDEL series that came out this week.  Not too bad, kinda slow but seems to have an interesting horror premise.  Plus, the artwork by Lawrence Campbell is really great.

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I was just going to mention this.

I was interested because Pornsak was an editor with Mike Carey and Mike said good things ( okay, Mike says very few bad things, so he said doubleplusgood things)

This was an exquisite first issue.

As we were talking about Gideon Falls, I really liked the slow burn but wished it had been longer,  but infidel uses the capacity so well. And it's horror. 

Also agree on the art, but it's Aaron Campbell. I can see why you thought that though 

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On 3/16/2018 at 1:55 PM, A. Heathen said:

I was just going to mention this.

I was interested because Pornsak was an editor with Mike Carey and Mike said good things ( okay, Mike says very few bad things, so he said doubleplusgood things)

This was an exquisite first issue.

As we were talking about Gideon Falls, I really liked the slow burn but wished it had been longer,  but infidel uses the capacity so well. And it's horror. 

Also agree on the art, but it's Aaron Campbell. I can see why you thought that though 

Oops, Aaron Campbell it is!  I've been reading a lot of post-Ennis Punisher MAX stuff lately and Lawrence Campbell was the artist on a lot of those, guess his name was stuck in my mind.

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So, it turns out that Milligan's Kid Lobotomy was a six-part limited series. It's probably for the best. So, thus ends Bond's best contribution to the post-Vertigo world. Anne Nocenti's The Seeds is still missing, leaving Berger's contributions to the post-Vertigo world lacking, as well.

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I thought Kid Lobotomy was promoted as an ongoing?

Maybe somebody's realised that S:TCM was originally promoted as a miniseries and got promoted to an ongoing after the first few issues did really well, and that reversing that approach for this title will provide balance...

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Umbra 3-part mini-series (originally published in 2006 by Image)-Also known as the other thing that Stephen Murphy wrote. This wasn't exactly The Puma Blues (but, hey, what is, right?)....This wasn't even exactly Murphy's run on Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (which I do love!). This was....kinda, sorta ok....

Even at three double-sized issues, it felt like Murphy really rushed the plot. There seems to be some deeper underlying meaning to the story fighting to emerge, but Murphy seemed to have trouble making the comic feel more than just shallow. I liked how Murphy used the extinct Great Auk in the plot (as it ties in well with the theme of Puma Blues), but it really didn't go anywhere. Murphy seemed to be copying an idea from Joyce with that scene, really.

Well, Murphy really only has three comic book titles that he's written, and if you've read the other two (which you really should!), this is what's left to read by Murphy. I wouldn't call it a bad read, I was just expecting a lot more from the story, but it's far from being an essential comic book reading experience (unlike Puma Blues!).

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Gudeon Falls was strong again this week, though I'm less interested in the story of the collector than that of the priest.

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RoboCop: Citizen's Arrest #1 (by Brian Wood)-This was a good read, with some nice social commentary. I thought that the world of RoboCop would be one that Wood could do something appealing with, and I'd say the comic feels like a Brian Wood dystopian science fiction series. Alan Grant wrote some entertaining RoboCop comic books, although he was going a bit too far towards Judge Dredd. 

The first issue could have fleshed out the world a bit more, as I'm unsure if this ties in with some sort of RoboCop continuity that's been built in the comic books, or if Wood is just starting this out fresh after the movies. If Wood is basically working carte blanch here, then the first issue needed a bit more world building to explain some of the details. Overall though, it's very similar to what was going on with the first RoboCop film, and I'm fine with that.

The main thrust of this series is that OCP has created a new APP that allows users to inform on other citizens who they feel have violated a criminal act, and citizens whose tips warrant an arrest are paid for helping the private police force. People spend their time spying on each other to the benefit of the corporate contractor. It's worth coming back for the next issue.

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Finally got around to reading Meltzer and Morales' Identity Crisis, and I'm not sure that it's quite as reprehensible and foul a comic as its reputation implies. The Alan Moore scene is gratuitous, and the final revelation is mind-numbingly daft (though I might be able to take it more seriously if Ambush Bug: Year None hadn't spoilered it) but it still works quite well as a story.

(Ish)

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It gets its reputation more because of what it represents and in hindsight, compared to most fans initial reactions to the series. I remember it getting some rave reviews, back at the time of its release. It was being billed by DC as a comic book on the same level as Watchmen and Dark Knight Returns, and a comic book that would change the way that comic books were perceived and written going forward. Sadly, it did end up having that sort of influence for a number of years on the comic world.

It was the beginning of the era of "superheroes aren't really superheroes, and they're not really good guys, but they're truly all morally ambiguous or amoral" period of mainstream comics. It paved the way for books like Marvel's Civil War.

I think left on its own, as an oddity of a comic, telling its own separate story, and billed as simply "Bred Meltzer writing a comic book", it wouldn't have gained such a horrible reputation. As it is, it sort of stands out as a comic that has rankled the industry, due to the long-lasting ramifications of that one series.

The fact that some bigwigs truly thought this was going to be the literary equivalent of Watchmen or DKR is laughable.

In a lot of ways, the initial popularity of Identity Crisis is exactly what has led to the sorry state that Marvel Comics is still in to this day (although some very bad business decisions also come in to play).

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That's on Marvel rather than DC or Meltzer, though.

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