Jump to content
JasonT

Other comics we read recently

Recommended Posts

An old character turned EVIL....but such a hilarious choice, and so over-the-top in his evilness. Yeah, definitely a send-up parody of a lot of the crap that was being published in the early-2000s.

There was also that amazing Machine Man nod to 1970s Marvel or to 1980s deconstructivism story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RE: Billionaire Island-I think Russell was a few months too early with this book. 
Now, had he written this comic about the ultra-rich living on an island to escape a virus....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2020 Visions, courtesy of a new trade edition. As far as I'm aware, it's the first color reprinting of 2020 Visions - the original covers were not included and it is printed in smaller dimensions than the average trade paperback however.

In most respects, Delano's speculative 2020 is even worse than what we've actually gotten, but the detail about the new plague in the first story sure hits a lot differently as of late.

It also comes with a new intro by Delano, where he describes his plotting on Hellblazer and Animal Man along the lines of making it up as he went in contrast to a more structured approach to 2020 Visions. That does explain the latter half of his Animal Man run, in all honesty.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure how the timelines add up but my memory is that Nextwave was basically the natural conclusion to the Warren Ellis Forum, I hold it in fond regard and it's one of the few series I still have in single-issue form.

Kieran on Twitter: "i'm just realising it now, but there's more ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that was the series that set up Elsa Bloodstone as a posh British psychopath rather than the Buffy rip off she started as in the Dan Abnett mini-series that introduced her, and that characterisation has stuck and then some, hasn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t remember seeing Elsa very much since NextWave, but yeah, I’m sure she’s still written as the psychopath rather than as Buffy.

She has a brother now, named Cullen.

He recently showed up in that horrible new Excalibur series.

 

They kept the NextWave characterization of Boomer too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a Marvel Zombies series by the boy Spurrier from a few years back (during all that Battleworld nonsense) with the Ellis version of Elsa. Sadly though, it ends with character growth and the like, which looks a bit odd given that he's lifted the stuff about her father wholesale from Nextwave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been reading quite a few comics recently -

Ed Brubaker's Death Of Captain America Omnibus : This and the preceding volumes in his run.  Good stuff blessed with some fantastic art that manages to handle some of the more superhero-y looking costumes in a grittier tale.

Captain Swing : An old Warren Ellis joint from his time at Avatar.  Pretty slight but again some good art and even Ellis-by-the-numbers is entertaining if nothing else.

Gravel : More Wozza at Avatar, this time the 21 issue series that followed the various Strange Kiss minis.  Combat Magician Bill Gravel fucks up people and talks like he's walked off the set of a Guy Ritchie movie.

Chip Zdarsky's Daredevil : First thing I've read from Chip and really enjoying it so far.  Only finished the first trade.  Chip's put Matt in an interesting place and the new detective dude's pretty col.

Kieron Gillen's Darth Vader : This...isn't bad.  Doctor Aphra's interactions with Vader ring a little hollow, he'd have sliced her head off by the end of her first appearance I reckon but that aside it's some pretty good Star Wars.

Next up - Ellis' 12 issues of Thunderbolts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved Ellis’ Thunderbolts mainly due to Ghost.

What an awesome reinvention of a character.

Ghost became my favourite Marvel character for the Ellis and Diggle Thunderbolts issues.

Too bad no one else did anything interesting with the character after.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ghost hasn't shown up in Thunderbolts yet and I've only got the one Ellis issue left to read. 

Really enjoyed it so far - it's very Ellis, nasty and horrible but also full of hope and good people doing the right thing just cause it's the right thing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I can’t believe I misremembered. I thought Ellis revamped Ghost, but it was solely Diggle.

I did really enjoy the Ellis run though. It reminded me of Ostrander’s Suicide Squad.

It was that Ghost was the best part of the Diggle run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same thought, CC. I thought Ghost was an Ellis character. He certainly acts like one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The second story of Ellis' run, where three unregistered heroes stand together against the Thunderbolts, is Ellis superheroes at their best - the sense of threat cultivated from the first story met by three heroes of varying degrees of sanity is so good.  Like I've just met American Eagle but please don't have Venom bite his limbs off Mister Ellis!  It's clear that he had a lot of fun writing Norman - the briefing where he keeps saying Spider-Man without realising it is genuinely funny.

Gave Baltimore a proper go last night, it's an adaptation of Mike Mignola's book by Christopher Golden and Ben Sternbeck.  The story follows Lord Baltimore, a survivor of a WW1 that ended prematurely after a vampire plague broke out.  The first trade is really just an excuse to fill in his backstory while he continues his pursuit of the vampire that killed his family.  The writing's grand, lots of action scenes which is just fine by me cause the artist - Sternbeck - is fantastic.  Baltimore's just a cool looking dude - he has a wooden leg, more rifles than a Liefeld character and likes tossing around a big bloody harpoon!  He also has that doomed man thing going on, y'know the score, anyone who gets close to him gets hurt kind of vibe.  I'll eat that shit up with the biggest spoon you've got, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished that first Baltimore omnibus, collects the first four trades and pretty much offers a complete story while setting up a whole new one.  Favourite comic read in ages, the whole aesthetic presses my buttons - muddy brown WW1 with monsters is apparently my vibe!  The extras in the back suggest that Mike Mognola's fairly heavily involved in the project.

The second omnibus just dropped, at 17 euro digital for 4 collected trades AND a new story by Mignola it's an absolute steal.  Might have to get both big collections in physical, just to have them there.

Just look at this dude -

Lord Henry Baltimore (Character) - Comic Vine

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really liked Baltimore at first, but I felt it went on too long, and I kind of lost interest in the plot, even though I kept reading until the end of the series.

I loved that early short story, with the giant spider. That was the high point of the series for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went through the fifth collection of the Al Ewing Hulk yesterday, and I'm starting to suspect that the nods to Moore's Swamp Thing are getting more overt as it progresses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've jumped in and out of that run a little, it looks pretty fucking wild!

Wrapped Gillen's Darth Vader run.  It's kind of hard to judge.  Younger me quite enjoyed wallowing in the Expanded Universe, still have a shelf of the old books here but some of the stuff here kind of rubbed me up the wrong way.  I know I'm being a bit precious but during the Vader Down crossover, Kieron's characters kind of kick-the-shit out of most of the OG characters and that really annoyed me.  Got me in a huff, please don't tell anyone.

Really liked the art throughout, I know the photo-realistic depiction of the cast in their younger days didn't work for a lot of people but it did for me!  X-Wings, Ties and all of the rest all look ace.  Vader himself is hilariously OP throughout which is how it should be.  Have the first Doc Aphra trade there too, so that's on the list.

Still reading through Gravel, nearly done with the Major 7 arc, it's pretty good mid-level Ellis.  It's all about the gross action scenes really and the bit where Gravel dispatches a galleon with an eldritch horror really tickled me.

Started Bendis' New Avengers run.  It's something I've always wanted to read so finally getting around to it.  I like his verbal tics, know they're not for everyone!  Opens with Hawkeye flirting with She-Hulk while the Avengers chill around the kitchen table, he's good at that kind of stuff.  Sentry shows up early on so reread that while I was at it, still holds up - wonder what Paul Jenkins is up to these days ?

First story in the second Baltimore Omnibus gives him a crew, was a bit disconcerting for them to just be there hanging out with him from the off but otherwise another fun violent WW1 monster romp.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It definitely reads very well indeed, and is every bit as good as Lou, Jason and Christian have been insisting. Cutting it up into six issue chunks for the collections leaves a lot of loose ends hanging at the end of most of them, though.

(One thing I'm really liking about it is that Ewing is obviously writing it as an extended storyline with a long term plan. That gives it a bit of an edge on the Peter David run which is great, but which looked a lot less structured as it was mostly David thinking of a neat riff on the character, carrying that as far as he could, then moving onto his next idea.)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished Baltimore, would agree with the consensus that it maybe ran a little too long.  Enjoyed the ramping up of proceedings as the end drew closer but the actual finale fell a little short for me.  Enjoyable read overall though and glad I finally got around to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only upside of this quarantine is that I've had some time to tackle various items in my digital and physical reading list.

Brubaker's Secret Avengers - An espionage-themed team of Avengers with members like Moon Knight and the Eric O'Grady version of Ant-Man written by Ed Brubaker should've been more entertaining or creative than what Brubaker turned out which felt like pretty standard genre fare. It's a rather underwhelming effort and some members of Brubaker's team like Moon Knight feel underutilized. Brubaker feels like he lost interest in the book at the end when he just leaves the book with the overarching villains of his run just running about, presumably to be dealt with by the following writers.

Warren Ellis' brief Secret Avengers run - Stand-alone, done-in-one stories with a strong team of revolving artists. Witty one-liners, long fight scenes, and far-out concepts as well as some less pleasant Ellis-isms like a good chunk of the stories abruptly ending. Not the best or most original of Ellis, but I had more fun reading his six issues compared to the twelve-issue one Brubaker had. Ultimately though, Ales Kot's later Secret Avengers run is the best book bearing the name that I've read.

And on the topic of Moon Knight - the Charlie Huston run on the book. I've not read his novels, but this comic definitely didn't make me feel like doing so. It's an average at best, run of the mill "mid to late 00s" grim and gritty Marvel book. David Finch's (and later Mico Suayan's) art doesn't help matters much in dispelling that feel. It's only Tomm Coker's contribution to Huston's last issue that stands out in a positive manner artwise. Huston does attempt to do some interesting things with Moon Knight's mental state and Khonshu but Jeff Lemire's later run accomplished these similar themes far more effectively.

A trade collection of DC/Dark Horse crossovers. It hasn't gotten off to a great start, even for a bunch of throwaway intercompany crossovers. Superman vs. Predator was written by David Michelinie and turned out to be a very bad waste of early Alex Maleev art. Next up was Superman vs. Terminators by Alan Grant, and unfortunately it isn't much of a step up in quality - feels like Grant did this one purely for the paycheck but I suppose if you're going to phone in a comic to pay the bills it might as well be Superman vs. Terminators. The next story is Robinson and Mignola's Hellboy/Batman/Starman crossover so hopefully at least some enjoyment can be wrung out of this trade!

Nocenti's Daredevil - first time reading stories from her run via the two Epic Collections. The collections begin part-way through her run, starting with the Typhoid Mary stories. Nocenti's style of writing does feel dated in that wordy and purply 80s style, but I appreciate the social angle (albeit with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer) she brings to her Daredevil stories and the stories with Mephisto and Blackheart are highlights. JRJR's art, who has always been hit or miss for me, works better for me here than many of his modern efforts. The downside is that the second collection brings in annuals not by Nocenti - most egregious a crossover between the Daredevil, Hulk, The Punisher, and Silver Surfer annuals that only tangentially involves DD. It feels like the annuals are here just to pad out the length of the collection, so a third Epic Collection could collect the remainder of her run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have been thinking on maybe picking up Secret Avengers myself so thanks for weighing in with your opinion!

Finished the Bendis run of New Avengers....well...kind of.  Pivotal events play out in the Siege event and his Dark Avengers run, neither of which I've read.  Overall though, decent little run of superheroes, like I said before I know Bendis' tics aren't for everyone and he's better at solo over team stuff but I liked the dynamic of his group and he tied everything together pretty well.

Just started a reread of Milligan's X-Force and was reminded that Zeitgeist from Deadpool 2 was actually taken from the comics!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I wasn’t that much of a fan of Brubaker’s Secret Avengers. It should have been a lot better.

I’d recommend the Ellis run, but it was the Ales Kot issues that are really worth your time.
It was quite amazing how Kot made his entire run a meditation on a Jorge Luis Borges story.

The Kot run is volumn 3 of Secret Avengers, part of a different series than the Brubaker and Ellis tenures.

I’d probably skip the Brubaker run, if I were you, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...