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JasonT

Other comics we read recently

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Nope. That's Larsen pretending to be Todd. McFarlane left Spider Man with issue #12, and Erik Larsen took over right after McFarlane on writing and art. You honestly could not tell the difference. Then, Larsen left after that story-arc, and Spider Man ended up with a revolving door of creative teams until Howard Mackie set his iron grip of doom upon the book, making it probably even more unreadable than the McFarlane and Larsen mess. Although there was some Romita Jr. artwork eventually, making the utter nonsense of the script look decent, unlike McFarlane or Larsen.

Aren't there supposed to have been a few decent stories before Mackie settled in? I know your man McGregor is supposed to have done a fill in with Michael Gold for it. That's probably worth a look, if nothing else is.

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The only one I remember liking was the J.M. DeMatteis Electro three-parter, which did a lot to humanize the character.

 

Anne Nocenti had a story where Spider Man met Thanos, but I don't remember it standing out to me. I don't think it really fit the Spider Man character.

It looks like McGregor's story was about "kids and guns". I think I found the story too preachy.

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Yep, just to confirm that's Erik Larsen alright - he draws some kind of Mary Jane, let me tell you! I quite like that cover to be honest and while the story is a nonsense there is a certain bombastic charm to it.

 

Spider-Man!

The Hulk!

Ghost Rider!

Deathlok!

Solo!

Nova!

The Fantastic Four!

 

Wait...who the **** is Solo ?!?

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Wait...who the **** is Solo ?!?

The guy out of Star Wars who shot first?

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I found some issues of Conan The Adventurer, from Marvel, in the back-issue boxes this past week. I figured since I have pretty much all of Marvel's other Conan work, and since it was written by Roy Thomas, I'd give it a chance. Conan The Adventurer was a Conan spin-off series from the early-1990s, when every comic book had to have at least two monthly titles, and was like an "untold tales of Conan's youth" companion book to the regular monthly title.

Lo and behold, much to my pleasant surprise, Thomas had adapted some Clark Ashton Smith tales in to Conan stories. I didn't realize Marvel had ever used any of CAS' writings.

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They'd probably run out of other S&S writers to strip mine for vaguely Howard-y pulp stories by then.

How does the untold tales thing work in that context? I thought Thomas spent the whole of his run on Conan and Savage Sword more or less carrying through on his insistence that every twelve issues covered a year of the protagonist's life. I wouldn't have thought that left much space for retconning stuff in later.

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Just got hold of a copy of Neil Young's Greendale, which reads a lot better than I was expecting.

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Further comics I have read recently:

I investigated that Phil Foglio Plastic Man miniseries, and it's great.

David Britton and Kris Guido's provocatively titled Fuck Off And Die is pretty great as well. It's a thinner collection than the big Meng & Ecker book, though.

A collection of Chris Claremont's Sovereign 7, which is more fun than you'd expect. Very much "ersatz X Men do DC" as well, which you'd also expect. No idea who a couple of the cameos for other people's characters are, though.

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I didn't realize Sovereign Seven was ever collected, at all. I've wanted to check out some issues, but the early issues are pretty scarce, at least around me, and I didn't really want to jump in half-way in to the series. I just figured I wasn't missing much, since it was post-Uncanny X-Men Claremont. Although, the first project Claremont worked on after leaving Marvel was an Aliens series from Dark Horse, which was really quite good. So, I guess the idea that Claremont never wrote anything worth reading after Uncanny X-Men isn't exactly the truth.

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I think there's only the one collection of it, which seems a bit off as it ran thirty odd issues. Mind you, you do get two stories and a lot of cameos, even if it barely explains anything, never mind resolving stuff. Also, I suspect the collection will be a lot cheaper than the comics if they're getting scarce now, and it has a couple of stories from the first annual at the front, before the first issue, where it seems they belong.

(I know you're a great fan of the Claremont X Men, so you'd probably enjoy playing "who's who" with those of the characters who are obvious substitutes for specific X Men, if nothing else...)

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Black Eyed Kids #1-I picked this up because it's based on the actual urban legend. I thought it might appeal to me as a Fortean fan. I wasn't too impressed with the comic. It's very much a horror comic, and I think that fans of horror fiction would enjoy it more. It might end up shaping up to being something more interesting.

For those unaware, the origin of the legend started in 1998, with sightings being made by a reporter from Texas. Other reports have followed.

Apparently, they're around teenage years youth who are hitchhiking or show up at people's doors in the middle of the night looking for help. They seem to lack all emotions. They wear hooded outfits, and, much like the vampire myth, must gain permission from the owners before they can enter the person's property. In the end, the kids are revealed to have black, gaping holes where their eyes should be, although they aren't injured. The eyes just appear soulless, like vacant black holes.

While the stories are creepy, none of them seem to involve any sort of violence.

Based on the scant information, but supposed repeated sightings, I can only conclude that they seem to be more a metaphor for today's aimless youth. Similar to the Alan Moore "vampire kids" story from his American Gothic arc.

Anyway, this comic story places them in a more malevolent context.

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Micronauts #1-The classic series returns from IDW! Ok, it may not have been so classic....still, Bill Mantlo. And, it was fun. This time it's written by Cullen Bunn.

I guess the Microverse is dying (or, I guess they can't call it that now, because that was a Marvel concept, so it's the Innerverse now)....Perhaps this is something to do with last year's Secret Wars?

It's well written, but the problem is, it doesn't feel very distinct. If it didn't say Micronauts on the cover, and feature Acroyear, I wouldn't realize this comic was based on an earlier comic (yes, I realize it was a toy line first). It has definite shades of Star Wars. I always felt like the Marvel series was an unique concept, taking place in a sub-atomic universe. This could just as easily be a space opera story.

So, fans who really miss the concept (Are there any? I mean, yes, there are fond memories of the Marvel Comic, but that's simple nostalgia) might be interested. It's not a bad story, like I said. It's just sort of generic sci-fi.

A really nice J.H. Williams cover though!

 

X-Files #1 (really, it's season 12 from IDW)-Same creative team as the two earlier "seasons", and it's really the same comic book. I guess you can reconcile this with the recent TV series by saying this comic takes place before the cliffhanger finale. Otherwise, there were not real references to the new show. Which, was probably a good thing, because the new show was pretty much a mess, as far as I'm concerned.

If you were reading the old IDW series and enjoying it, you'll still keep enjoying this series. If you're expecting something different, don't bother. I liked the IDW series, so I'll keep reading this.

 

Aliens:Defiance #1-Brian Wood comes to the Alien universe! If you were expecting something ground-breaking, you'll be sorely disappointed. If you were expecting a classic Aliens story that tics all the boxes for fans of Aliens, Wood does the same type of job he did on Dark Horse's final Star Wars series. It's better writing than Wood's run on Star Wars though, I find, as he seemed to be bored writing the Star Wars monthly.

I'm not sure when this takes place in the Aliens time-line though....I'm guessing it takes place between the first and second movies. Does it really matter?

A space marines ship under the mandate of The Company finds a derelict ship drifting off a planetoid. Corporate security androids are sent to investigate, along with the main character, a female colonial marine soldier. The derelict ship is discovered to be infested with Xenomorphs, which the security androids are tasked to destroy, supposedly. One of the androids rebels, however, and reveals that The Company is involved with a conspiracy, involving plans to capture a Xenomorph and develop it as a weapon. Surprise!

Even though it is very familiar, I have to admit to enjoying the comic. It's not bad.

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Weird Detective #1 (by Fred Van Lente)-This was quite good. It's a lot like Martian Manhunter done through the lens of H.P. Lovecraft. The Lovecraft elements are minimal enough that it doesn't read like just another Lovecraftian pastiche comic. There's some gruesome horror bits, as well, which I was surprised to see from Van Lente, really. There's some really neat ideas spread throughout the story, as well. Quite an enjoyable read.

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Micronauts #1-The classic series returns from IDW! Ok, it may not have been so classic....still, Bill Mantlo. And, it was fun. This time it's written by Cullen Bunn.

I guess the Microverse is dying (or, I guess they can't call it that now, because that was a Marvel concept, so it's the Innerverse now)....Perhaps this is something to do with last year's Secret Wars?

It's well written, but the problem is, it doesn't feel very distinct. If it didn't say Micronauts on the cover, and feature Acroyear, I wouldn't realize this comic was based on an earlier comic (yes, I realize it was a toy line first). It has definite shades of Star Wars. I always felt like the Marvel series was an unique concept, taking place in a sub-atomic universe. This could just as easily be a space opera story.

So, fans who really miss the concept (Are there any? I mean, yes, there are fond memories of the Marvel Comic, but that's simple nostalgia) might be interested. It's not a bad story, like I said. It's just sort of generic sci-fi.

Like every other Micronauts comic that's appeared since Marvel stopped doing that one, then?

:tongue:

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