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JasonT

Other comics we read recently

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We were discussing that Wildstorm 25 Years hardcover in another thread last week, did anyone actually pick it up?  I'm curious as to what material was reprinted in it and if the new stories were worth the price of admission.

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4 hours ago, JohnMcMahon said:

Picked up all of Hack/Slash as it's going cheap on comixology, light fare, odd-couple vs slashers.  Also grabbed some '68, zombies in Vietnam.

Don't go through all of Hack/Slash in one go, John: it probably works best in small doses as while fun it's very samey.

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On 10/31/2017 at 12:49 PM, dogpoet said:

Don't go through all of Hack/Slash in one go, John: it probably works best in small doses as while fun it's very samey.

That's a fair assessment, it's just one of those series that's been around forever and the price was too good to resist.

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Not to change the subject, because I love reading the Ballard/Burroughs debate

[EDITOR'S NOTE: the discussion referenced here has been moved to a new thread http://hellblazer.ipbhost.com/topic/10770-one-in-a-milligan/ because it really deserves to be more prominent]

(seriously, it's fascinating the different takes on the meaning behind Kid Lobotomy, which was excrement yet still seemed to have fostered some great conversation), but I've got a new comic recommendation.  THERE'S NOTHING THERE was a comic published by Black Mask that just wrapped up with issue # 5, and it was a really great ghost story that dealt with fame and the public spotlight.  It was written by Patrick Kindlon and illustrated by Maria Llovet, and it really gave that old school 90s Vertigo atmosphere.  Check it out when the trade gets released!be

 

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I've got the middle three issues of that one, but not #1 or #5. I was quite impressed to see a cameo for Oscar Zeta Acosta as one of the ghosts in that one. Lovely art as well, but I wasn't as impressed by the microceleb fixation at work.

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OK, so I guess that the complaints about Kid Lobotomy are accurate. The plot seems to be something of a mess. This is a comic book suffering from ADHD. Which is a shame, because I really did want to like it, as there are few too "artsy" comic books around, and far too few comics I am really enjoying right now. I'm still going to give the book one last chance, because I want to like the book, and at least Franz Kafka is going to show up next issue, so that's something for my collection.

I read the first issue of There's Nothing There. OK, it's just the first issue, so I can't comment very much on the overall quality. The one thing that I felt was very inauthentic was at the beginning of the comic, the starlet girl was going on about the slave trade in New York. This seems at odds with her self-centered and empty-headed portrayal throughout the rest of the comic. Does she have hidden depths that she keeps hidden due to her stardom, and feels that's not who the public wants in its "it girl"? That might be the case, but it seemed completely at odds with her portrayal throughout the rest of the issue.

It seemed more like the direction it was going was that she was going to be woken up from her insulated world and realize that not everything revolves around her. That was what I got from this first issue.

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Also, picked up three issues of the four issue comic book adaptation of Fritz Lang's M with art by Jon J. Muth (it was published by Eclipse Comics). This is an absolutely stunning piece of comic book artwork. If you come across copies of this, make sure to pick them up. The beautiful artwork is completely worth the price, even if you've seen the movie.

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44 minutes ago, Christian said:

OK, so I guess that the complaints about Kid Lobotomy are accurate. The plot seems to be something of a mess. This is a comic book suffering from ADHD. Which is a shame, because I really did want to like it, as there are few too "artsy" comic books around, and far too few comics I am really enjoying right now. I'm still going to give the book one last chance, because I want to like the book, and at least Franz Kafka is going to show up next issue, so that's something for my collection.

I read the first issue of There's Nothing There. OK, it's just the first issue, so I can't comment very much on the overall quality. The one thing that I felt was very inauthentic was at the beginning of the comic, the starlet girl was going on about the slave trade in New York. This seems at odds with her self-centered and empty-headed portrayal throughout the rest of the comic. Does she have hidden depths that she keeps hidden due to her stardom, and feels that's not who the public wants in its "it girl"? That might be the case, but it seemed completely at odds with her portrayal throughout the rest of the issue.

It seemed more like the direction it was going was that she was going to be woken up from her insulated world and realize that not everything revolves around her. That was what I got from this first issue.

I wasn't going to waste my time on Kid Lobotomy after the first issue, but I am sorry the second issue was a mess for you, since you were the biggest proponent of it that I've encountered so far. Just because I hated it that doesn't mean someone else can't find merit in it, y'know?  Here's hoping it evens out for you in issue # 3!

I read There's Nothing There all in one go week before last, so things are kind of blurring together for me, but the way I took that slave trade exchange at the start of issue one was that the main girl (whose name escapes me, even though it shouldn't, been a helluva week) was simply regurgitating facts to appear socially conscious.  She does this a few times in the series, if I remember correctly, because she is superficial and vapid and totally enamored with herself.  She has this false air of "I don't care what people think of me" (and that REALLY comes into play in the third issue, I believe), but she absolutely DOES want people to think she's more than she really is when it comes to being a responsible adult talking about responsible adult things.  Everyone just kind of blows her off as an airhead, which she totally IS, and that infuriates her even more when she starts seeing ghosts and everyone just smiles and says "oh there you go again".  

Or I may be WAY off base with that reading, lol.  Still, though, I thought it was a series with an interesting mystery.

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That sounds plausible to me. It would fit with air-headed celebrities who love to take up some cause....like "Free Tibet!" or "I'm a feminist, because I'm a woman!", so they look like they have some sort of social responsibility or autonomy....but, really, they're just vapid and shallow.

Still, she seemed to have been better read than a lot of the air-head celebrity set with their causes, having a sense of history.

Like I said, I can't say for sure because I only have issue #1, but your interpretation definitely makes sense.

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1 hour ago, Christian said:

That sounds plausible to me. It would fit with air-headed celebrities who love to take up some cause....like "Free Tibet!" or "I'm a feminist, because I'm a woman!", so they look like they have some sort of social responsibility or autonomy....but, really, they're just vapid and shallow.

Still, she seemed to have been better read than a lot of the air-head celebrity set with their causes, having a sense of history.

Like I said, I can't say for sure because I only have issue #1, but your interpretation definitely makes sense.

The brown buffallo's in the third issue.

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On 11/9/2017 at 6:02 PM, Christian said:

Also, picked up three issues of the four issue comic book adaptation of Fritz Lang's M with art by Jon J. Muth (it was published by Eclipse Comics). This is an absolutely stunning piece of comic book artwork. If you come across copies of this, make sure to pick them up. The beautiful artwork is completely worth the price, even if you've seen the movie.

That is excellent. My memory of it is that I got a 7" flexi disc of soundtrack. I wonder if that's something else of a similar time / type.

[fakenewscheck]  I was right.

 

Loved his artwork and storytelling.

 

 

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I'm a huge Bond fan, and that first Ellis arc was really excellent, but for some reason I didn't keep up with the series after that.  Lots of great writers attached to it, though, so I'll have to rectify that sometime in the future.

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5 minutes ago, Ixnay by Night said:

I'm a huge Bond fan, and that first Ellis arc was really excellent, but for some reason I didn't keep up with the series after that. 

I think for me I just assumed it would be traded later. Those issues always felt a little thin for 4 bucks. But loved the Vargr story

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1 hour ago, Lou K said:

I think for me I just assumed it would be traded later. Those issues always felt a little thin for 4 bucks. But loved the Vargr story

They all have been traded, haven't they?  I know Ellis' second arc, "Eidolon" (and boy does he love to re-use names like that) had a hardcover release like "Vargr", I just never picked it up. 

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Yeah for $17 it’s not bad but i’d Prefer a cheaper softcover. 

Yeah I️ did get a chuckle at the title. I️ think he changed a vowel to make it seem he didn’t just do that. But he did. He did just do that. 

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Just gone through an oddity: a Trina Robbins adaptation of Tanith Lee's The Silver Metal Lover as a comic. Robin's gloriously and elegantly clean linework is exquisite, but I'm not sure it entirely works as a comic. Beautiful to look at, though.

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On 11/12/2017 at 2:46 PM, Ixnay by Night said:

I knew he had a run on Ultimate Fantastic Four, but as I'm as likely to read a FF book as I am to light myself on fire for the fun of it, I've not read it.

Why the disgust with Fantastic Four, Ixnay? Is that all FF, or just the fact that the book has been so bad so often?

Because, when FF has the right writer, it is one of the best examples of the super-science genre out of all comic books.

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby is one of the quintessential mainstream comic book reading experiences.

I can understand if maybe you're one of those comic readers who find Silver Age books dated, and can't read them.

Then, there's the John Byrne run, the Mark Waid run, the Jonathan Hickman run (all must read!)....and when the regular FF book was nigh-unreadable for so many years, Mike Carey had a nice run on Ultimate FF which was far better than anything from 616-FF between the Waid and Hickman runs.

There was also an incredibly fun abbreviated Walt Simonson run (not sure if it's even ever been collected), and I'm a fan of the Gerry Conway run from the '70s, but yeah, outside of that, there's nothing else worth reading from the history of FF.

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I have a Fantastic Four: Visionaries of the first half of Simonson's run, but I have no idea whether they collected the rest of it or not. You'd think that would be perfect for one of those Epic collections they've phased out the Essentials for, as well.

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The Fantastic Four is just one of those concepts that has never managed to interest me, no matter how many times I've attempted to get into it.  I was a kid when Byrne was doing the FF, and though I read it off and on it wasn't something like Claremont's X-Men or Stern's Avengers that I was always excited to read; I tried Simonson's run, and outside of the "New FF" arc with Art Adams it couldn't hold my interest either.  I have the same feelings about the FF that I do about Superman and Wonder Woman: I get why people like them, sure, but they're just not for me.  :shrug:

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Man, I can't imagine anyone not loving this story from Simonson's run....It was what Grant Morrison on FF should have been like, instead of the middling and dull Fantastic Four: 1,2,3,4.

Fantastic Four (1961 1st Series) 352

 

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