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Mozza back to Vertigo?

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Grant Morrison is supposedly taking a break from superheros and will next be writing under the Vertigo banner.

 

I'll post links as I find 'em.

 

I hope he decides to write one of the following:

 

1) something original

2) Hellblazer (after Milligan's had his fair share, of course)

3) Shade the Changing Man

 

 

From the article Balty linked to at CBR:

[artist Sean] Murphy is now finishing up another six-issue run of the long-running Vertigo series [that would be Hellblazer] before moving onto other Vertigo projects with Grant Morrison

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I think the chances of Morrison writing either Hellblazer or Shade are hugely slim. The most I could see him doing would be a fill-in on HB.

 

I can't imagine him going to Vertigo to do a franchise character. He doesn't seem to have much interest in Vertigo franchises anymore (not that I blame him).

 

I could be wrong though.

 

I can't even imagine what his take on Hellblazer would be like now. Not sure I want to find out.

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I'd like to see him do a two-issue fill-in during Pete's run, with John Smith doing a fill-in issue six months later. It'd feel like old times.

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'Cause he hasn't gotten to infuse Constantine with his own magic beliefs?

Constantine+drugs+chaos magic/warpy Morrison=WIN

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I, for one of many, cannot wait for him to move on from the no doubt highly paid corporate-owned fansturbation and get on to some proper work.

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2 potential projects (one which will happen, the other?):

 

1) The long-awaited sequel to Seaguy --The Slaves of Mickey Eye

 

Morrison (THE INVISIBLES) rejoins original SEAGUY artist Cameron Stewart (SEVEN SOLDIERS) in an all-new adventure starring the cult-favorite character!

 

In Seaguy’s cartoon future world, everyone is a Super Hero and no one dies. It’s absolutely perfect...Or is it? In this follow-up to the cult 2004 miniseries, Seaguy resurfaces with a sinister new partner, a hatred of the sea and a rebel restlessness he can’t explain. Why are Doc Hero and his ex-archenemy Silvan Niltoid, the Alien from Planet Earth, whispering strange equations? Why is Death so useless? And can that really be the ghost of Chubby Da Choona mumbling uncanny warnings and dire prophecies of ultimate catastrophe?

 

When the grotesque powers lurking behind the corporation known as Mickey Eye and the Happy Group attempt to erase Seaguy’s entire existence, can he possibly get it together in time to save a world so far gone it can’t even imagine the horror lying in wait? Find out here in Morrison’s own personal reframing of the Super Hero concept for the 21st century.

SEAGSM_Cv1.jpg

 

2) War Cop, a six-issue miniseries, is more about our post-9/11 world. “It’s about the atmosphere of war and terror, and making a mythology out of it,” Morrison said. “So it’s about a guy who’s testosterone-enhanced to be the ultimate soldier — guys sniff his sweat, he’s so much the ultimate man. He’s been bred for war, and he wins the war, but now that he’s won the war, he needs a new one. So he starts looking for other enemies. He’s become paranoid and he’s imagining conspiracies.”

 

Along the way, the soldier teams up with a kid who’s involved in a youth cult called the Inside Outers. Instead of simply wearing name brands, the kids of the not-so-far-off future cut the labels off their clothes and swap it with their own names. “If you like a particular candy, you pin the label on your jacket so your friends know what you’re into,” Morrison explained. “And you put a sticker with your name on it on your candy or your Coke. So for instance, I would be drinking ‘Grant’ not Coke. I would be wearing ‘Grant,’ not Versace.”

 

With a pumped-up soldier soldier and a beyond-trendy sixteen-year-old helping each other out, “you’ve got a real odd couple,” Morrison said. “And they’re targeted by those who want to exploit that oddness. I don’t want to say more than that just yet, because it’s very high concept and someone might steal it, but together, they find what the new war is.”

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Morrison also has a project coming from Virgin Comics.

Unfortunately, it's a series of animated web episodes rather than a comic.

I think that's a shame because I would like to see Morrison move to some different smaller companies and try some new things.

Well, really I just want to see it as a comic, because any time there's more Morrison comics on the shelves, my comic reading pleasure is just a little bit more (sometimes a hell of a lot more).

His project from Virgin Comics will be a "Western" reimagining of the Mahabharata epic. He's worked a little bit with those ideas, the vimana for one. But, I think it will be interesting to see what Morrison does with such an adaptation of that type.

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I've been thinking about this a lot lately and I prefer Morrison's superhero work. Animal Man, Zenith, Doom Patrol, The Flash, X-men, JLA, All Star Superman, 52, even, Seven Soldiers and Final Crisis are all books that I found more interesting than stuff like The Invisibles and The Filth (his Batman left me cold though). and the

 

I find most of his non-superhero work to be pretentious and the weaknesses inherent in his story-telling usually outweigh my interest in his huge, mad ideas.

 

 

 

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Morrison also has a project coming from Virgin Comics.

Unfortunately, it's a series of animated web episodes rather than a comic.

I think that's a shame because I would like to see Morrison move to some different smaller companies and try some new things.

Well, really I just want to see it as a comic, because any time there's more Morrison comics on the shelves, my comic reading pleasure is just a little bit more (sometimes a hell of a lot more).

His project from Virgin Comics will be a "Western" reimagining of the Mahabharata epic. He's worked a little bit with those ideas, the vimana for one. But, I think it will be interesting to see what Morrison does with such an adaptation of that type.

 

Isn't Virgin Comics dead? I heard they were shutting down.

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I've been thinking about this a lot lately and I prefer Morrison's superhero work. Animal Man, Zenith, Doom Patrol, The Flash, X-men, JLA, All Star Superman, 52, even, Seven Soldiers and Final Crisis are all books that I found more interesting than stuff like The Invisibles and The Filth (his Batman left me cold though). and the

 

I find most of his non-superhero work to be pretentious and the weaknesses inherent in his story-telling usually outweigh my interest in his huge, mad ideas.

 

I'll give you the early superhero stuff and All Star Superman, but the rest is just slightly cleverer retreads to me, and the deeper he gets into the superhero universes and crossovers the more un-necessary baggage his stories have. I tried hard with Seven Soldiers but it was like someone decided to use rejected Invisibles stories to construct a tribute to old comics. It's nice that he's opened some doors to people who'd not have touched his stuff otherwise.

 

we3 and Vimanarama are the recent works that I'd like to see him aiming for.

The latter may not have been completely successful* but he did what he does for superhero universes with a much richer and less hackneyed source material.

 

(*that's to save people saying that they think IT WAS SHIT)

 

"Pretentious" is the new "over-rated".

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Vimanarama...may not have been completely successful*

 

(*that's to save people saying that they think IT WAS SHIT)

 

You could have just mentioned me by name, you know.

 

I've got no real preference either way - I think a lot of Morrison's best work over the years has been done with superheroes (and not just "the early...stuff and All Star Superman", by any means), but he's spent so much time with them over the last few years that I think he's pretty much run out of interesting things to say in that genre, at least for the time being. I don't entirely agree with Ade's comment about "slightly cleverer retreads", but I do think that it's an increasingly-valid critique of his work over the last few years, culminating in Final Crisis, which is - depending on how generous one happens to be feeling - either a culminating summation of everything he's been working towards in his DCU work throughout his entire career, or a sloppy mish-mash of themes and plot elements he's done before, only not as good.

 

I don't think Tom's entirely wrong about "the weaknesses inherent in his storytelling" sometimes becoming more obvious when he's working outside of the restrictive confines of shared-universe superhero books, either. Then again, those same weaknesses have been cropping up with increasing frequency in his superhero work of late as well (see Final Crisis again), so perhaps a change of genre will do him good.

 

That said, I'm a lot more excited by the prospect of Seaguy 2 than I am by War Cop, which really doesn't sound like something that'll appeal to me much. I think Morrison's at his weakest when he's attempting incisive pop-cultural analysis, mainly because he's nowhere near as good at it as he seems to think he is. There's nothing wrong with being hung up on the cultural aesthetic of your youth (for Morrison, that seems to be the late-'80s/early '90s rave/neo-hippy culture, for the most part, suggesting that he hit "youth" a little later in life than most people), but it helps to be a bit more self-aware about it than Morrison tends to be.

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[

I'll give you the early superhero stuff and All Star Superman, but the rest is just slightly cleverer retreads to me, and the deeper he gets into the superhero universes and crossovers the more un-necessary baggage his stories have. I tried hard with Seven Soldiers but it was like someone decided to use rejected Invisibles stories to construct a tribute to old comics.

 

Weirdly, Seven Soldiers actually has very little DCU related baggage. In fact I'd say that most of the baggage there is Morrison's alone.

 

 

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Disagreed. It's got fuck-all to do with the contemporary mainstream DCU, but that doesn't mean there isn't plenty of baggage coming from older superhero books. There's a lot more to it than just that, but a huge portion part of Seven Soldiers is comprised of overt homages to Kirby, particularly his '70s DC stuff. It's not just the obvious stuff, like characters he chose to use - even the structure, with the way events in one book fill in gaps in the narrative of another without directly crossing-over, is a fairly direct extension of the way Kirby constructed his Fourth World books.

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But isn't that form rather than content?

 

If the books had been about a team of mystical espionage agents who were out to achieve fuck all it still would have seemed garbled and disjointed.

 

Ade's point regarding baggage seemed, to me at least, to point towards editorial DCU but as far as 7 Soldiers was concerned the baggage was all Morrison. If anything it could have done with a much stronger editorial hand. Most of his recent work could.

 

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But isn't that form rather than content?

 

Yes, but given how important that sort of formalism has been to so much of Morrison's recent work, I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss its significance. Besides, it's not as though the content of that recent work has been short on loving - and overt - homages to the '70s DCU he grew up with, particularly the work of Kirby and Len Wein. That's to say nothing of his Batman run, which has been even more deeply immersed in the comics of the past than Seven Soldiers or Final Crisis.

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