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A. Heathen

The Unwritten

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dogpoet    483

Most likely.

Which does suggest a terrible comeuppance for said character a few issues down the line by the very same story logic, of course.

 

Dead right about the art thing, btw, Red: the only example I can think of with somebody doing the same thing in prose and actually making it work is the green and red print in The Neverending Story, and that's expensive typography, particularly back when that was published. Of course, that could be as much a genre issue as a problem with the medium given that contradictory narrative streams in prose tend to be more of a conceit than a plot device, beloved of the sort of postmodernists who want to show their contempt for their medium rather than exploiting its potential*, so using signifiers to organise the levels and make them more comprehensible at a glance is obviously completely out of the question.

 

*(People who've swiped a few tricks from John Barth without realising why or even understanding how he uses them, as a rule.)

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Shawn    297

When I go to re-re-read ALL of Unwritten, once it wraps soon, I will skip the Fables stuff.

I came close to stopping reading Unwritten completely over that nonsense, to be honest.

I hear ya. There was some temptation for me to drop it, but my faith in Carey held strong. I had to talk a friend, who's been reading in trades, back from the "ledge." He says he'll likely skip that volume.

I prefer to think that the Fabels cross-over was the penance Carey & Gross had to pay so they could finish Unwritten on their terms. :-)

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Christian    776

To be honest, I've never been able to get back in to Unwritten again afterwards. I thought that book sort of meandered around for a bit after issue #25, then the Fables cross-over hit, which took Unwritten right off the tracks. Even when the Apocalypse story-line started, while I enjoyed the first issue, I've found it underwhelming.

It's funny that I argued vehemently against those who said that book was mainly wrapped up after the events of #25, but now I wonder if the story in #25 didn't end up removing most of the interest directions from the title. I do still argue that there were plenty of unwrapped threads after #25, and I don't necessarily think that the book should have been done, but I haven't been able to fully invest in the book again after #25, so apparently the arguments had some validity after all.

 

I can't rank The Unwritten anywhere near Lucifer, for Carey's best work. The first 25 issues are exquisite and nearly perfect, but Lucifer managed to remain above the average for 75 issues (and a special).

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dogpoet    483

Even "The Wolf Beneath The Tree"?

I remember all sorts of bitching about that storyline on the DC boards, back in the day...

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Red    467

I really like "The wolf beneath the tree".

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dogpoet    483

Fair enough. I'm probably confusing it with another story towards the end that turned people off, or misremembering, then.

 

(Either that or it just reads a lot better as a complete story than it did in single issue chunks, I suppose. That goes for a lot of Carey's extended stories, after all.)

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Red    467

So, have any of you guys read #9 yet? That was a pivotal issue, IMHO, and I'd be interested to hear others' views.

 

The issue shows that both Pullman and Wilson have been used as puppets by Rausch, and they don't even know it has happened. Basically, the three of them have different agendas: Pullman wants an apocalypse, he wants to destroy the world. Wilson wants to get rid of Leviathan so people will be able to make their own stories, and Rausch wants to become god, by eradicating humanity and replacing them with her own creatures.

The most interesting thing is what this means for Wilson as a character. In the issue, he knows he's been manipulated, but not how or by whom. So he concludes that he has to make Tom be independent of him, and to do that he has to make him hate him. So he's been acting like a dick towards Tommy on purpose! How's that for tough love?

 

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Christian    776

I thought it was better than the last number of issues of Apocalypse. I thought more could have been done with the Inklings in the story though.

What confused me was Wilson's agenda. Wasn't Pullman attempting to do the exact same thing, re: Leviathan?

I know his reason for doing so wasn't the same, but wasn't the idea that Pullman needed to be stopped from fulfilling his agenda with Leviathan.

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Shawn    297

The next to last issue!!! Let that sink in a bit. Grab some tissues.

 

That was quite good as Tom & crew get their shit together for a final assault. There were deaths. Many! I don't know what's next after that last page. I trust in Carey!

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Vagabond    154

yeah, it's been a great run. assuming he sticks the landing, and i don't see any reason he wouldn't, this is definitely on my short list of comics i recommend to people who are new to comics.

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Red    467

The next to last issue!!! Let that sink in a bit. Grab some tissues.

 

That was quite good as Tom & crew get their shit together for a final assault. There were deaths. Many! I don't know what's next after that last page. I trust in Carey!

And what a doozie of a cliffhanger that ended on!

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Gwilym    330

I've been reading this in the trades; really, really loving it - except Unwritten Fables, which was just awful. Or at least boring as shit. What in the blazes was that all about? I mean, I don't like Fables, but it's not like I love every single other bit of fiction Tom's visited, and they've always been used brilliantly. I actually had to struggle to get through this. I feel really sorry for anyone who was reading it monthly. I've flicked through this thread (trying to avoid spoilers) and saw that a lot of you definitely struggled to maintain interest. Crossovers are usually sales drives, I thought? The six months of this crap seemed absolutely tailor-made to haemorrhage readers.

 

It's such a damned shame; the series hasn't always been A+ from start to finish, but it's been damned close to it, with no clunkers anywhere. Now there's an entire bloody trade of them. With a volume number and everything!

 

I'm now reading The Ship That Sank Twice, written around the same time, and once again loving it. It's almost like this is the Unwritten arc he'd planned to write before being forced into doing a shitty phoned-in crossover.

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Vagabond    154

The Ship That Sank Twice might have been my favorite part of the series. I skipped the crossover. I would LOVE a Tommy Taylor miniseries in the future.

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Shawn    297

Gwilym, I was much like you when I read all of that. After that bad taste of the Fables cross-over, TT&TSTST was like a refreshing, life-giving elix. It's really amazing.

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dogpoet    483

Right, so that story that should have been part of the series was farmed out as an OGN to make way for six issues of drivel?

Bloody hell...

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Gwilym    330

Gwilym, I was much like you when I read all of that. After that bad taste of the Fables cross-over, TT&TSTST was like a refreshing, life-giving elix. It's really amazing.

 

It really really was. And then the first issue of Unwritten Apocalypse was even better. Absolutely stunning and easily one of the single best comics I've ever read.

 

I See A Lion was just... wow. A beautiful moment, a beautiful construction, a beautiful message. Just glorious. I'm pretty sure my eyes were the size of dinner plates while I read that bit.

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Shawn    297

Right, so that story that should have been part of the series was farmed out as an OGN to make way for six issues of drivel?

Bloody hell...

 

Carey & Gross's deal with the devil, I assume.

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Vagabond    154

well here it is.

 

 

Frankly, this isn't publishable. The Potter people would sue our arses into the ground.

 

pretty sad ending overall.

 

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Christian    776

It wasn't bad as an ending...hitting all the boxes that needed to be closed off. Although, there were high expectations for something much more creative, I'm sure. It was more of a generic ending, where you pretty much knew exactly where it was going, and that's exactly what was accomplished.

Personally, I stopped expecting that much a while ago with the book. It's perfectly fine, and a quite good comic, but very much in the middle of the road as far as its legacy and greatness within comic books. It didn't hold up to the quality of Lucifer, when it looked within the first 25 issues like it was going to top Lucifer, without any doubts.

From that point, it sort of lost its focus, and seemed to be killing time, with a few great stories amidst a lot of average. Then, we come to the downfall point, the Fables mess. After the relaunch, it still didn't hook me again, even with the very strong first issue. By that point, I was just marking time until the ending, to see if it was going to compare to Lucifer with the final issue, or just end. It basically just ended, although the final issue was not bad.

So, yeah, it ranks pretty far below Lucifer, in the larger scheme. I'll always hold those first 25 issues very dear though.

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Vagabond    154

Yeah I'll definitely agree with that. Its highs were extremely high but it kind of lost its focus. How many issues was it total, 40 or 50? Ending was good, not great.

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A. Heathen    1,159

The final arc is pretty damn good in its own right. Definitely as good as any other arc of the series.

I agree with the Great Fables Calamity being a mis-step but it probably extended the life of the book to be able to end properly.

 

I don't think there's anything wrong with a story about fiction ending in what some might call a generic fashion.

There are three or four endings here, and each of them is generic to its own genre, and Tom was always the tragic hero.

 

It's quite sad that DC is eschewing this quality of comic in favour shite superheroes for children.

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dogpoet    483

Whatever can be said against the misjudged Fables clusterfuck, it did have a perfect ending and final issue. The stuff with Wilson at the end, in particular, is a beautifully judged slingshot ending.

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Red    467

I think that ending was quite good. Not as powerful as Lucifer, but really well-thought through and the various parts held together. And I really loved the "solution":

 

"I brought you to the only story where the whale wins."

 

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