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Greek Street

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GREEK STREET #1

Written by Peter Milligan

Art by Davide Gianfelice

Cover by Kako

You’re a boy from the hood. You’re brought up rough in a children’s home, trying to stay out of trouble but usually failing. Then at 18 you decide to track down your mother. Within hours of finding her, she’s lying naked and dead at your feet. So you run to Greek Street.

And that’s when your troubles really begin…

Boasting a cast of sexy strippers, murderous gangsters, body-snatching mad women and a disturbed young girl who can see the future, GREEK STREET is Peter Milligan’s reimagining of those brutal and visceral tragedies that graced the Theater of Dionysus in Ancient Greece – bloody tales about incest, homicide, beautiful oracles, all-knowing choruses, kings, monsters and gods – played out on the mean streets of modern-day Red-Light London.

Milligan – best known for his super-smart Vertigo work like SHADE THE CHANGING MAN, HUMAN TARGET and now HELLBLAZER– joins forces with illustrator Davide Gianfelice (NORTHLANDERS) to create an epic ongoing series that’s both familiar yet completely new and always with the bloody, visceral edge that makes it a Vertigo book. Take a trip to GREEK STREET where the old stories are not through with us yet.

On sale July 1 • 40 pg, FC, $1.00 US • MATURE READERS

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http://www.comicbookbin.com/petermilligan001.html

 

CBB: Would you mind describing your recently announced new series, Greek Street? (a) What’s the basic concept? (b) Who is the hero or protagonist? © Does he have an antagonist or huge obstacle to overcome?

 

MILLIGAN: Greek Street is a re-imagining of the ancient Greek Tragedies, played out on the rough red light streets of modern London. Greek Street has a large and varied cast – gangsters, strippers, Lords of the Realm – but our protagonist is a kid named Eddie. Eddie grew up in a series of children’s homes, and when we pick him up he’s decided to track down his real mother. This has far-reached consequences. The antagonists or obstacles that Eddie faces are manifold. To take an ancient Greek view of it, his biggest obstacle very often seems to be the machinations of Fate itself.

 

CBB: Who is drawing Greek Street and is that artist already influencing what you’re doing with the series?

 

MILLIGAN: The artist is Davide Gianfelice. Davide’s great. I wouldn’t say he’s exactly influencing the series, but I’m intrigued by Davide’s take on London and Londoners. It doesn’t look quite like anything I’ve seen before.

 

CBB: Sometimes a writer has to ask himself, “Will anyone care?” You have your reputation as an inventive and imaginative writer, so that generally makes people curious about your new work. Still, is there something about Greek Street that is so exciting to you that in turn might also excite readers, especially those unfamiliar with your work?

 

MILLIGAN: First of all, I think the more important question you ask yourself as a writer is “Do I care?” I feel very passionate about Greek Street. It’s very unusual, and it’s (I think) incredibly rich and complex and at times downright weird. Yet, at its heart is something and someone who’s very human, very fallible. That’s what fascinates and moves me about Ancient Greek tragedy: that it can reach out to us across all those centuries. For all the Gods and strange customs, it seems to be about what it is to be human, interacting with a less than perfect world. To be human in an imperfect world…how can anyone fail to be excited by that?

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Thanks for that, Greg.

 

 

CBB: Who is drawing Greek Street and is that artist already influencing what you’re doing with the series?

 

MILLIGAN: The artist is Davide Gianfelice. Davide’s great. I wouldn’t say he’s exactly influencing the series, but I’m intrigued by Davide’s take on London and Londoners. It doesn’t look quite like anything I’ve seen before.

Is it just me, or did anyone else read between the lines there? :wink:

 

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Greek-Street.2.jpg

GREEK STREET #2

Written by Peter Milligan

Art by Davide Gianfelice

Cover by KAKO

Monsters, magic, gangsters and sex – this is the world of Greek Street that young Eddie has fled to. But will he stay one step ahead of the police? Will the ghost of the mother whom he killed continue to haunt him? Or will his dealings with the violent and treacherous mobsters, The Fureys, finally turn his already tough life into a complete tragedy? Don’t miss the stirring new series from fan-favorite writer Peter Milligan (HELLBLAZER) and artist Davide Gianfelice (NORTHLANDERS)!

On sale August 5 • 32 pg, FC, $2.99 US MATURE READERS

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It pretty much means he's popular in comic geek circles, but that he doesn't have the "street cred" of a Neil Gaiman, and also hasn't won a lot of awards.

They can't put "New York Times best selling author" or "legendary award winning author of"....

Like, "You know that writer, Peter Milligan?"

"No."

"Do you read a lot of Vertigo titles?"

"Some."

"Do you remember a book called Shade The Changing Man?"

"Oh yeah! That was trippy as fuck, man!"

"That was Peter Milligan."

"Oh, sweet!"

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Sounds about as meaningful as those reviews that say "fans will like this". :smile:

 

I always associate "fan-favourite" with Marvel's attempts to promote Ron Lim to the A-list in the 1990s. Heh.

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'fan-favourite' - you've heard of them

 

'acclaimed' - comic that did not win any awards and (if Vertigo) was probably cancelled

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Interview and preview of the first seven pages -

http://comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=21498

 

Although "Greek Street" takes place in the same imprint and same city of the Vertigo flagship title "Hellblazer" – which Milligan also writes -- the similarities between the books stop there. Milligan explained, "London is the only thing that 'Hellblazer' and 'Greek Street' have in common. As the name suggests, London is more integral to 'Greek Street' – for those who don’t know, Greek Street runs through Soho. Here, London is our Temple of Dionysus, the stage on which Eddie and the other charcters’ fates unwound. London also exists like some distant God, able to help or hinder Eddie as Eddie struggles with his fate. We feel that London could destroy Eddie whenever it wants. With John Constantine, it’s a much more evenly matched. Constantine is probably as likely to destroy London."

"I’m really interested in Constantine as a person,” Milligan continued. “Flawed. I want to see how he reacts when we really put him through the churner. Plus, I’d like to see him interact with a character I wrote a long time ago."

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"I’m really interested in Constantine as a person,” Milligan continued. “Flawed. I want to see how he reacts when we really put him through the churner. Plus, I’d like to see him interact with a character I wrote a long time ago." [/i]

Jesus if he means Shade than he really has forgotten hasn't he?

 

Who else on the Vertigo imprint could it be?

Perhaps the supporting characters of Shade and surely not Christopher Chance.

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Jesus if he means Shade than he really has forgotten hasn't he?

 

Who else on the Vertigo imprint could it be?

Perhaps the supporting characters of Shade and surely not Christopher Chance.

 

Please please please let it be Rogan Josh.

 

Or a clash of the Johnnys - Constantine vs Nemo...

 

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Well, I've been mega excited for this and finally finished reading. After all the hype and expectations, did it live up? HELL YES! This was awesome goodness. Fantastic and intriguing writing with top-notch art. I can't be the only one who picked this up? Who else did? It was only $1, c'mon now.

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I'm still waiting on a copy because the [over-used word]s I mail order from only bother to send stuff out after it's been circulating for at least three weeks.

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I didn't care for it. at all. The story didn't grab me, though the art was very nice.

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Sorry, Balthazar, but here's another +1.

 

I thought the storytelling was unclear, the characterisation lacking, the whole thing hard to follow and unengaging. The first ten pages were promisingly fucked-up, but after that, it lost focus. Maybe Pete tried to fit too much into the first issue for my tastes. It's unlikely that I'll get issue 2.

 

The art didn't help with the characterisation. Faces were heavily stylised and pretty much similar, and everyone had the same clotheshorse build, except for the old chunky gangster. I also think the artist's storytelling undermined the point where

the gangster cut his son's face

... it started out like, "holy crap, he's really gonna do it!", then it looked like he'd been talked out of it. Then at the top of the next page, he did it off-camera, as a kind of "by the way". For me, the buildup of tension was wasted. And we'd never seen the victim before, and didn't really give a f*ck about him anyway. I'm not saying things like that have to be milked, I'd just like to have seen it presented with more impact. Same goes for most of the rest of the comic.

 

Sorry to be a cock, Greg — if the comic pressed your buttons, then that's fine by me.

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Thanks for a reminder, a forgot to pick it up earlier this week.

 

Finally read it and was rather confused - too many characters without any introduction, just popping out and disappearing, too many plot points and transitions that left me with "what the hell is going on?" every couple of pages. The narration with letter fragments and dialogue didn't work for me - it breaks the pace rather than establishes it.

 

I didn't like the art at all - all the faces and expressions are similar and generic so i had hard time identifying characters.

 

Might check out the next issue to see if it gets any better.

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I read this comic on Thursday (I believe), and there were quite a few aspects that bothered me while reading the book, but today (Saturday), I just can't really remember the book all that well anymore to give it a thorough review.

I'll just state I was also disappointed with Greek Street, as I felt it was just trying far too hard. Shame.

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It did feel a bit flat, maybe because it was trying to introduce so many characters at once. There wasn't anything I particularly disliked, but there wasn't anything to really hook me in either. A solid introduction rather than a spectacular one, I suppose - I'll pick up the next few issues at least to see how it goes.

 

I did like the art, though - I like the style, and Gianfelice makes it feels more like London than a lot of the overseas artists we've seen on Hellblazer ever managed (not mentioning any particular Frusin). Coincidentally enough, I'd just been reading his initial run on 'Northlanders', which is a lot of fun.

 

I agree it's not always clear what's actually going on. It's only now I'm flicking through it a second time that I realise that's Mischa being fished out the river - think I was confused by the first appearance of the floater, where it's not obvious that it's Sandy's vision.

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