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Rassmguy

Who should take over the writing chores?

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But is research enough to capture the feel of a setting? One of the reasons I got hooked was because of the specifically described details of the setting.

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That depends on the setting and the purpose it's being used for, surely? Research can be plenty good enough for a lot of fiction, unless the setting is being established as part of the main thrust of a story.

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I think that's taking what has been said too far.

 

The focus of a story is where the attention should be "what you know" but then we'd lose an awful lot of fantasy and sci-fi which would be a shame (and I know some modern sci-fi is more closely linked to sci-fact than in days gone by, but consider those speculative classics). The surrounding environment can be constructed as a real place either by knowing it well (which sometimes leaves detail that is too dense) or by sketching plausible details around the main story.

 

Even in Mike Carey's Hellblazer there are some moments that rely not on London but on the reader's perception, but Ennis and Delano have very sketchy location in most places. Azzarello was quite open about his method of dealing with place, but his focus was on people's reactions to Constantine - sometimes to the detriment of their basis as real characters. Mina's Glasgow was a very real location, but apart from Constantine her cast were shallow (or completely at odds with their previous appearances - although Milligan is the paragon of that fault).

 

The supporting cast can be more believable in certain cases. Andy Diggle's work is a good example of that.

And Paul Jenkins, although they seem to have been mostly autobiographical.

We all have soft spots for some of Ennis's Constantinian friends, although the bulk of his villains leave a lot to be desired.

 

Apart from Delano's proximity to Alan Moore, all Hellblazer writers have done the magic stuff by making it up. ;-)

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There might be ten thousand Americans who have (a) a better grasp of London than I do and also (b) The same affection for the old girl as I do while also © many times the skill at writing a story than I have, all while having been there in person LESS than I have been.

 

Shit, maybe there are hundreds of thousands of Americans who could "really write convincingly of the eccentricities of London" to a higher standard than I could. And I could probably sit down and pound out at least a dodgy "Gor Blimey Mary Poppins" version with nothing more than the memories from a life spent reading British works, so imagine what some Yank talent could do with research?.

 

No small amount of talent in the place, and of course, 310 millions to work with.

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So the whole "write what you know" philosophy is bullshit?

What Ade said.

(I'd describe the "write what you know" thing as a start or a foundation, rather than everything you'll ever need to write fiction, myself.)

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So the whole "write what you know" philosophy is bullshit?

What Ade said.

(I'd describe the "write what you know" thing as a start or a foundation, rather than everything you'll ever need to write fiction, myself.)

 

Damn, I think we just blew our chances of some damn fine saucy nurse tales.

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Hmmm. summink to ponder then. I do feel the urge to punch any of my past creative writing teachers in the mouth, though. Mainly because they were twats but also from realizations I may or may not be having.

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A lot depends on what sort of fiction you plan to write, but I've always found Brian Aldiss' comment that a writer can write about things that concern them however little practical experience they have of those a bit more convincing. "Write what you know" has given us Kim Newman's fiction drawing on film and Arthur C Clarke's SF dealing with astronomy, but it's also given us millions of words of Martin Amis blathering on about Martin Amis.

(Or to put it another: if all you know is tiresome, write about something else.)

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well I don't write because I'm too lazy to deal with capitalization and punctuation, but I do read quite a bit. When I was hospitalized for a month in a room with a dick who hogged the remote control, all I did was read from when I couldn't wake up to when I couldn't sleep.

 

Why do we captialize "I" but not "me?" and why don't we capitalize "you"? Or "he" or "she?"

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Why do we capitalize "I" but not "eye"?

You capitalize "He" if you are referring to Him Who Is Not To Be Named*.

 

*Yes, I do mean our Great Lord, Cthulhu.

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A lot depends on what sort of fiction you plan to write, but I've always found Brian Aldiss' comment that a writer can write about things that concern them however little practical experience they have of those a bit more convincing. "Write what you know" has given us Kim Newman's fiction drawing on film and Arthur C Clarke's SF dealing with astronomy, but it's also given us millions of words of Martin Amis blathering on about Martin Amis.

(Or to put it another: if all you know is tiresome, write about something else.)

 

 

This is a genuinely brilliant post. No further comment to add to this rather interesting conversation, but I couldn't let it go unmentioned.

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With all the goodwill in the world, you're bloody welcome to him :icon_wink:

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and more generous. none of my realtime friends have ever gifted me with comics, art and music at the same time. or separately, now that I think about it.

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