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Maritimus

I RULE. Everybody else is a fool

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It took two readings before my mind translated "Joseph Campbell" as "Joseph Conrad".

I'd have to say that Campbell would be an even more interesting and risque choice.

 

I'd like to see Edmond Hamilton on Legion of Super Heroes. That seems like a perfect fit, right? :icon_wink:

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Iain M Banks on one of the more central, straight forward Superman books.

 

He has the very fine grip on human motivations and how, though the link to the entities being human is oft tenuous, they will remain with us though we become as Superman through technology.

 

Look to Windward isn't the least bit about technology, really, it is all about loss, redemption, service, loyalty, etc.

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If we're talking Superman, I could list SF writers all day.

How about Ian Watson, Robert Holdstock, "Maxwell Grant", Geoff Ryman, Alastair Reynolds, Roger Zelazny or Paul McAuley?

(I'd say Larry Niven as well, but he's already taken a shot at that one...)

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I wish I knew half the writers you guys are mentioning.. Could you give a brief description of any kind why a writer is good for a character? - i think it would open up a lot of possibilities for potential readers. If you dig Brubaker's Criminal for example - you would probably love James Ellroy and his LA Quartet - The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, LA Confidential and White Jazz. It has deep, conflicted characters, Noir era LA, corrupt cops and plots so large, twisted and dark it makes The Old Testament pale by comparison.

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I'd go with Ian Watson on Superman. Watson is all about cosmic concepts and big ideas.

The only drawback is that each issue would have Superman teaching Lois about the intricacies of some concept for 22 pages, and then fighting the menace for one page.

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I'd go with Ian Watson on Superman. Watson is all about cosmic concepts and big ideas.

The only drawback is that each issue would have Superman teaching Lois about the intricacies of some concept for 22 pages, and then fighting the menace for one page.

 

That sounds like a silver age Superman, a scout boy and a scientist, and after all the explaining, PAH!, everything is taken care of with a punch in the gut of the space lizard monster.

 

I think Shakespeare would write a decent Superman, a depressed prince from a destroyed kingdom, against Lex Luthor, who will do anything to become the king, backstabbing, black magic and murder. Only Prince Superman can stop him. If he can self-pitying.

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I'd go with Ian Watson on Superman. Watson is all about cosmic concepts and big ideas.

The only drawback is that each issue would have Superman teaching Lois about the intricacies of some concept for 22 pages, and then fighting the menace for one page.

 

 

lol.

 

Superman would have landed his baby-spaceship in West-Bengal and been adopted by a middle aged factory owner and his wife, the acme of probity, piety, and endeavour. Said factory being one that makes knock-off personal computors, though their daughter is opening a new sideline for the family business, Artificial Intelligence support services, with an eye to making the ideal Bollywood actor, entirely pixulated.

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How about having Stephen King script a few of the many comics with his name on the cover? At least young Joe King writes Locke & Key himself...

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I believe Stephen King wrote a big chunk of the first couple of issues of American Vampire, before Scott Snyner took over for good. There is also The Dark Tower adaptation out there with Jae Lee and Sean Philips on art.. not sure if it's good but it does look nice, although the colors by Isanove are a bit bright for this sort of story.

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It's probably better with less King anyway.

He'd fit right in with the "writing for the trade mentality" though.

He can easily write a 300+ page novel, where there are enough ideas to safely carry about 50 pages worth of plot. So, yeah...an 8-part story-arc where nothing happens until chapter eight sounds perfect for King.

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It's probably better with less King anyway.

He'd fit right in with the "writing for the trade mentality" though.

He can easily write a 300+ page novel, where there are enough ideas to safely carry about 50 pages worth of plot. So, yeah...an 8-part story-arc where nothing happens until chapter eight sounds perfect for King.

LARGE_word.jpg

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Just thought of another one:

Mick Farren on Ragman. If anybody can do something interesting with that character, it's Mick Farren.

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