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Shawn

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Here's a preview of Bitter Root, written by David F Walker, whose work I shamelessly promote.

https://www.previewsworld.com/Article/217855-Sneak-Peek-Bitter-Root-1-From-Image-Comics
 

Quote

 

Manhattan's Harlem neighborhood became the center of an intellectual and artistic explosion by black writers and artists in the 1920s that spanned writing and painting to music and culture that scholars today call "the Harlem Renaissance." A little known chapter of the Harlem Renaissance is told this fall in Image Comics' Bitter Root by David F. Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Green — a Harlem family, the Sangeryes, has been trained for generations to hunt monsters, and they are all the stand between New York City and a monster armageddon!

 

217855_1248467_6.jpg

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I'm none too sure about the supernatural elements in that one. I was really enjoying the synopsis, when I first read it: David F. Walker....Harlem Renaissance....little known chapter....yeah, yeah....monster hunters? Then, no. Maybe not.

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Yeah, I was down for everything in that synopsis as well until it got to the "monster hunter" bit.  Might still check it out, I dig Sandford Greene's artwork.

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It's possibly intended more as a sort of jazz era take on Supernatural than a serious history of the Harlem renaissance in the first place?

It's even possible that the Harlem mis en scene is a deliberate counter to how conspicuously whitebread Lovecraft and his circle were during the pulp era. Even if that's as far as the Harlem renaissance stuff in this comic goes, it's still something that was conspicuously missing from the contemporary pulps.

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Had the "monster hunter" bit been more Lovecraftian in tone, I might have more interest in it. Even still, it's not that original a take, as a number of African-American or progressive types who want to like Lovecraft, but still feel that revulsion when the creeping racism sets in with some of his stories, have written revisionist responses to Lovecraft's fiction in recent years. It's probably best not to go in that direction.

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Reading Velvet by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting.

Pretty damn good comic. Brubaker is great at espionage tales and this one delivers. It's pretty much, and this is obvious so I don't think it requires a spoiler tag, a James Bond tale where "What if Miss Moneypenny was actually a high profile agent".  

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2 hours ago, JasonT said:

Yeah, that was a great comic. Have you read Fatale and The Fade Out?

Got em both in the hopper 

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Ah, but have you read Brubaker's "An Accidental Death" serialized as three-parts in Dark Horse Presents? It was one of Brubaker's earliest forays in to comic books, but it was very good.

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