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Christian    781

Because they have a power mad editor-in-chief? Because a lot of people might not want to speak up, since said editor-in-chief has been willing to chase away writers who have a problem with his creative vision? Because they have a consistent #1 monthly book with Batman? Because there's a policy in place that says that "only the fittest books survive", so if titles fail, it's because they weren't good enough for the market, and they'll get replaced?

Sure, that policy is looking really stupid as the majority of DC's line has been canceled, and they're at a place where they've run out of new characters to replaced the canceled books, so they have to launch more Batman and Superman comics. But, they can argue that these random Batman and Superman books are selling better than books like Dial H and Animal Man.

In the corporate world, a book like Constantine means very little.

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slinker    893

it boggles me that no one can get the character right, no one has since Denise Mina. How is that possible?

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Demon Chas08    295

Only a 4% drop in June, are orders starting to stabilise ?

 

Possibly a fluke. I've already predicted the drop for this month to be bigger

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A. Heathen    1,162

If crossover buyers are the main body of sale then you may be right.

However, more publicity and a better story could well see sales stabilise or even pop up.

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JohnMcMahon    587
You don't suppose comic shop folks are seeking to cash in on unrelated publicity for the TV serie?

Because of that whole weird three-month lag between orders and shipment, I doubt that's what we're see here.

 

I hope they give the creative team a decent run of issues to try and build something - that first year was a mess of gimmicks and cross-overs.

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Demon Chas08    295

Except with Fawkes, there is no better stories. I can see retailers recommending the Hellblazer trades first before Crossover Central

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JohnMcMahon    587

Heidi McDonald on those latest numbers -

 

This is dangerous territory for a DCU book. Granted this book has a bit more rope due to the upcoming television series, but if it doesn’t turn around soon look for a major creative change to try to goose the numbers (probably to bring it more in line with the tone of the show).

 

http://comicsbeat.com/dc-comics-month-to-month-sales-june-2014-bombshell-bonanza/

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Demon Chas08    295

I can't see the show stopping the sales from falling anymore than Man of Steel stopping the Didiot and Lee's quest to shove Superman and Wonder Woman as couple down everyone's throats

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A. Heathen    1,162

I think you are confusing "better" with "excellent" that we were used to.

Many years ago.

 

But those three pages are not enough to undermine the improvement of the last issue.

I'll reserve judgement until I have seen more.

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JasonT    450
.... I expect DC will keep Constantine alive for a while, due to the TV show coming out.

 

As we now know, that won't be happening in the TV show. :icon_wink:

 

If DiDiot and co really want to save face, they better revive Hellblazer by either continue from 300 or start a 2nd volume.

 

The launch of the TV show would have been a good opportunity to re-re-boot the comic and spin it as a positive. It's a dead opportunity now, unless someone has been working away in secret.

 

 

What I could easily see is that they start vol. 2 by revealing that John faked some fucking thing or other in #300, and has moved to America to start over. That way it could be closer to the TV show, but retain continuity.

 

Fixed that for you. Am I the only one on the forum who thinks setting the show in the USA is as good a decision as setting the comic in the DCU?

 

 

...Third: Whats up with vertigo anyway? There was a time (i'm still kind of catching up) when vertigo seems to have been THE place to go for high quality, good stories and artistic freedom. What happened?

 

The nineties ended.

 

 

EDIT: So did June. :blush:

Edited by JasonT
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seventhcircle    595

 

...Third: Whats up with vertigo anyway? There was a time (i'm still kind of catching up) when vertigo seems to have been THE place to go for high quality, good stories and artistic freedom. What happened?

 

The nineties ended.

 

i don't understand is that an excuse for shitty editorial staff, or did art somewhat die when the two zeros came around?

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Lou K    1,083

Sort of, yes.

 

Didn't things go south when one of their long time editors left? Was it Shelly Bond?

 

You might take into consideration, at least for me anyways, is that Vertigo (and some of the early frontrunners from DC) was mostly the main source for commercial adult comics. Sure there were some great indy adult stuff. But then when adult comics, or comics for mature readers, bceame the norm, Vertigo wasn't the only game in town for sophisticated story telling.

 

Just speculatin'.

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Christian    781

I just don't think Vertigo is considered important in the long-run anymore. Imprints like Vertigo at the Big Two are on their way out. Marvel phased out MAX over the past few years...not that Marvel ever committed very much to it, and most of the MAX titles were like bad impressions of what "mature readers" comics' image invokes. Image is replacing what lines like Epic and Vertigo used to represent. It may be that there's just not enough market sustainability for both Image and Vertigo.

I think maybe the biggest reason, though, is how Marvel has changed from the 1990s. Marvel never bothered much with good writers during the 1990s. They had their editors doing a lot of the actual scripting, and they hired people to write dialogue for the editors. At that time, DC had picked up talent like Gaiman, Morrison, Ennis...

Skip ahead to 2000, when Marvel got Jemas as editor-in-chief. Jemas' big idea was to take all those big names from the 1990s at DC and bring them to Marvel to shake up their line. Suddenly, creative writers were being associated with Marvel. Of course Jemas only lasted a few years.

But, Marvel had created a new model. Try to find hot, young writers and put them under contract. So, Marvel raids Image Comics of all their writers and gets them to sign contracts.

Who does DC have? Jeff Lemire....Peter Milligan....maybe one or two others.

So, that could very well be the big reason that Vertigo is an after-thought today. All the writers who should have been taking over writing at Vertigo are under contract with Marvel, and doing their own thing at Image.

Perhaps it is just a day that has passed. I was just looking through my box of Vertigo Comics the other day and thinking about how many great books came out of Vertigo during the 1990s.

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